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Old 04-07-2013, 10:31 PM   #1
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Butt splice - 8 ga

I had to cut my 8GA output cable from my generator to be able to pull it out and replace the exhaust elbow.

How do I connect them back up? Butt crimp connectors?
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Old 04-07-2013, 11:42 PM   #2
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I had to cut my 8GA output cable from my generator to be able to pull it out and replace the exhaust elbow.

How do I connect them back up? Butt crimp connectors?
Yes, but you would have done better to disconnect one end, pull it out of the way, and then reconnect it.

It's hard to find a crimper for #8 connectors.
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Old 04-07-2013, 11:51 PM   #3
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Meridian, I'd send you mine on loan, but you could probably buy it for the round trip shipping charges.




Hydraulic Wire Crimping Tool
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Old 04-08-2013, 01:13 AM   #4
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If you can have both ends on the cable before reinstalling it, take it to a battery shop. They'll be able to add the end you need and it'll only cost you a couple of bucks.
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Old 04-08-2013, 08:51 AM   #5
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I would be tempted to replace the harness...expensive yes...but depending where I had to crimp...it might be worth it in the long run.

If you can get the harness out...West Marines will let you use their crimpers.

If you have to do it in place, either butt splices or use rings and a terminal block/enclosure in case you every have to break it apart again.

Some auto parts stores lend/rent tools...check with them if you need lug crimpers.
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:34 AM   #6
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Rather than a butt connector, you could put on some ring connectors and attach to a busbar - easy to disconnect should you ever need to remove it again.
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Old 04-08-2013, 05:30 PM   #7
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[QUOTE=FlyWright;147589]Meridian, I'd send you mine on loan, but you could probably buy it for the round trip shipping charges.

FlyWright: I ordered one of these on your recommendation. Agreed that the die sizes are all wrong, but at $40 after discount from HF it is still really good value. I would not be without it.
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Old 04-08-2013, 05:34 PM   #8
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Rather than a butt connector, you could put on some ring connectors and attach to a busbar - easy to disconnect should you ever need to remove it again.
He will still have to have a way to crimp #8 connectors and he will have twice as many to buy and make, plus the (insolated) buss bar.
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Old 04-08-2013, 05:45 PM   #9
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How about a butt splice a cold chisel a hammer and some solder.

Works for me .

Then again I do many things with what I have around.

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Old 04-08-2013, 06:32 PM   #10
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How about a butt splice a cold chisel a hammer and some solder.

Works for me .

Then again I do many things with what I have around.

Sd
I don't know about the cold chisel and hammer. Doesn't seem like that would crimp the connector correctly. Solder? Nope. Not on boat power wires/cables.
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Old 04-08-2013, 07:27 PM   #11
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Using a terminal buss makes sense if you think disconnecting it ever again may happen...no matter how many more connectors or the price.

Using a cold chisel and hammer is abut the same as using the $50-$60 dollar hammer crimper West Marine sells...you may actually do it better. But nothing like a good crimper...they are pretty impressive to what they do to the wire and connector connection.

Even ABYC says soldering is OK as long as a mechanical fastening is also employed and suitable support is provided.
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Old 04-08-2013, 07:39 PM   #12
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Using a cold chisel and hammer is abut the same as using the $50-$60 dollar hammer crimper West Marine sells...you may actually do it better. But nothing like a good crimper...they are pretty impressive to what they do to the wire and connector connection.

Even ABYC says soldering is OK as long as a mechanical fastening is also employed and suitable support is provided.
Wrong on both counts. You need a die for a proper crimp. There's no way to control the chisel/hammer combination. You might not get a good crimp (you won't anyway without a die) and you might cut right through the connector.

Soldering turns stranded wire into solid wire. Not good.
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Old 04-08-2013, 07:47 PM   #13
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OK I'm wrong and lot's of others with the same opinion as both of us..... But ABYC does discuss soldering without dismissing it and there are plenty of electrical connections out there that weren't made with a proper die including the mickey mouse hammer crimper I described...and work just fine.

Sure there's perfect way of trying to do things...well heck I know a lot of pros with the best tools that still screw up.

I give real world advice...whether it helps someone or not is better than always quoting some theoretical solution or what some people do because they WANT to as to what will work just fine anyway.

"Solder shall not be the sole means of mechanical connection in any circuit.11.16.3.7.
http://www.marinco.com/page/abyc-standards

Wrong on both accounts...lets let the jury decide.
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Old 04-08-2013, 09:34 PM   #14
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I have two technicians at work that perform identical duties. One is a perfectionist and the other is not. Both of them perform their duties in exemplary fashion demonstrating complete competence in the trade.

The perfectionist has a tendency to take a long time to get a routine task done that the other performs rather quickly. They both have their strengths and weaknesses and are both well liked by their peers.

When the crap hits the fan and an emergency pops up I'll say this, it ain't the perfectionist that gets the call. Nothing wrong with his skill to perform the repair but sometimes ya just gotta get stuff done in a timely and cost effective manner.

One can not think outside the box and the other can. Like I said though, there ain't nothing wrong with either of them they just go about things differently is all.
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Old 04-08-2013, 09:48 PM   #15
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Is soldering OK if you use a wire nut as a mechanical connection?

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Old 04-09-2013, 12:05 AM   #16
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Is soldering OK if you use a wire nut as a mechanical connection?

No. How are you going to solder a wirenut without melting it?

The problem with soldering stranded wire or cable is that the molten solder wicks along the wire away from the joint and creates what amounts to solid wire. The point where the wire turns from solid to stranded is a place where the wire may fail from vibration.

In the OP's situation, we're not talking about an emergency repair (where wire nuts or even twisting and taping without soldering would do the trick until a proper repair could be made), we're talking about a permanent repair to the man's boat. A repair that should be done right the first time.
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Old 04-09-2013, 12:20 AM   #17
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OK I'm wrong .................
Being wrong once in a while is nothing to be ashamed about. None of us can know everything about everything.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:03 AM   #18
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Here is my standard reply when a thread is joined by some posting WNFC.

II you want the textbook answer read the manufacturer’s directions, a book on boat maintenance and repair or listen to the guys who regurgitate exactly the same.
If you came to the internet to learn alternative, progressive, money saving, time saving, or just sometimes “better than” ideas, usage or application…then read away and decide for yourself.
Any poster that say’s some post is wrong or not acceptable or not to some “voluntary standard”…well that’s their opinion. Unless someone posts a link to a reasonable third party expert…then you decide if you can decipher backgrounds, practical experience in the boating world and just plain old common sense being posted.
Enjoy your boating and have at it!!!
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:03 AM   #19
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Being wrong once in a while is nothing to be ashamed about. None of us can know everything about everything.
Guess YOU missed the link to the ABYC standard.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:21 AM   #20
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The requirement is for a splice or connection to be made both mechanically and electricallyand insulated.

Get a piece of copper tubing where the ID matches the OD of the 8ga.

Put the wire in the tubing , hammer it flat , solder it , and cover with shrink tubing.

Not as good as a replacement wire but close enough for a couple of decades.
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