Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-09-2013, 08:15 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
IslandEagle's Avatar
 
City: Toronto & Nanaimo
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Island Eagle
Vessel Model: DeFever
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 232
Gents,

You might want to read this paper: http://www.newark.com/pdfs/techarticles/tyco/ET.pdf

The gist of it is that a proper crimped connection can be superior to a soldered one. Why? I quote:

While other methods are considered strong mechanical connections with high-performance electrical properties, crimping provides strength under constant load in tension and severe vibration. Crimp connections tend not to crack or creep under sustained loads. Fatigue is not an issue. Since the mechanical performance of a crimp is robust and sound, the electrical properties are less likely to degrade. In short, static heating is avoided when good crimping practice is followed.

Soldering also has the disadvantage that it will compromise the insulation adjacent to the solder joint. Crimping is the recommended connection method for military and aerospace use.

Here are my recommended steps in ensuring a long-lasting, electrically-superior connection:

1) Use high-quality tinned wire.
2) Use a heavy-gauge tinned terminal.
3) Use the correct crimper for the gauge, and ensure that the crimper crimps the entire circumference.
4) For high-current applications, finish the joint with adhesive heat shrink to exclude all oxygen.

Here's my main DC electrical switchboard. It's now been ten years since I installed it, and there has not be one single problem with a connection.

Scott Welch
Island Eagle
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF1401-1_1024.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	125.8 KB
ID:	17876  
__________________
Advertisement

IslandEagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2013, 08:30 AM   #22
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by IslandEagle View Post
Gents,

You might want to read this paper: http://www.newark.com/pdfs/techarticles/tyco/ET.pdf

The gist of it is that a proper crimped connection can be superior to a soldered one. Why? I quote:

While other methods are considered strong mechanical connections with high-performance electrical properties, crimping provides strength under constant load in tension and severe vibration. Crimp connections tend not to crack or creep under sustained loads. Fatigue is not an issue. Since the mechanical performance of a crimp is robust and sound, the electrical properties are less likely to degrade. In short, static heating is avoided when good crimping practice is followed.

Soldering also has the disadvantage that it will compromise the insulation adjacent to the solder joint. Crimping is the recommended connection method for military and aerospace use.

Here are my recommended steps in ensuring a long-lasting, electrically-superior connection:

1) Use high-quality tinned wire.
2) Use a heavy-gauge tinned terminal.
3) Use the correct crimper for the gauge, and ensure that the crimper crimps the entire circumference.
4) For high-current applications, finish the joint with adhesive heat shrink to exclude all oxygen.

Here's my main DC electrical switchboard. It's now been ten years since I installed it, and there has not be one single problem with a connection.

Scott Welch
Island Eagle
Thank you!
__________________

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2013, 08:35 AM   #23
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,920
Never disagreed that proper crimping is the best way...it's just not the only way.

My first post suggested where to get the proper crimping tool...

I was just offering support to Skipperdude's suggestion when he was incorrectly corrected.

He like many other's here aren't always around the corner of West Marine.

Just like post #18 says.....
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2013, 09:30 AM   #24
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Never disagreed that proper crimping is the best way...it's just not the only way...........
It's the only "best way". I think when people come her looking for advice, we should try to give them only good advice.

In this thread, the OP already decided that crimping was how he should repair his wire. He was just looking for confirmation, but instead he got several bad alternatives and a bunch of bickering. That's not what makes for a good forum.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2013, 09:12 PM   #25
Guru
 
River Cruiser's Avatar
 
City: UMR MM283
Country: US
Vessel Name: Northern Lights II
Vessel Model: Bayliner 3870
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,228
Try a welding supply shop they will have a twist- lock connector. These are used to attach lengths of cable when you need longer leads. Good luck
__________________
Ron on Northern Lights II
I don't like making plans for the day because the word "premeditated" gets thrown around in the courtroom.
River Cruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 06:38 AM   #26
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,531
I think when people come her looking for advice, we should try to give them only good advice.

Choices and concepts are better , as "Best" frequently requires special parts and special tools .

Special everything means ordering/flying in parts and bribing the customs guy .

A repair that works and can be done underway , in nowhere, can always be replaced sometime for perfection.
FF is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 06:49 AM   #27
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,920
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
I think when people come her looking for advice, we should try to give them only good advice.

Choices and concepts are better , as "Best" frequently requires special parts and special tools .

Special everything means ordering/flying in parts and bribing the customs guy .

A repair that works and can be done underway , in nowhere, can always be replaced sometime for perfection.
Sounds exactly like what Skipperdude was communicating...being where he is...
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 08:04 AM   #28
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Here's the original post:

Quote:

I had to cut my 8GA output cable from my generator to be able to pull it out and replace the exhaust elbow.

How do I connect them back up? Butt crimp connectors?
Go ahead and give him a reply. Stop defending bad suggestions.

If you are in "nowhere", you won't have a soldering iron or a piece of copper tubing to fit the wire. You won't have a cold chisel. Strip it, twist it together as best you can, then insulate it with tape and hold it up away from metal or moving parts. Do a proper repair ASAP.
__________________
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 09:13 AM   #29
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,920
I have all the above.

Sounds like FF does.

Sounds like Skipperdude does.

Sounds like many cruisers should because in a pinch, many ways work safely .....so we thought we might suggest some for the rest of the audience.

It's not like everyone in this forum stays TOTALLY on topic every thread.

And when they can...use good connectors and a proper crimper...maybe with or without a terminal block for future disconnects...
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 09:20 AM   #30
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,154
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
It's not like everyone in this forum stays TOTALLY on topic every thread.
If only! You guys should really stop this pointless bickering.People do different jobs different ways and neither of you will convince the other. Let it go, please.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 11:37 AM   #31
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPseudonym View Post
I have two technicians at work that perform identical duties. One is a perfectionist and the other is not. Both of them perform their duties in exemplary fashion demonstrating complete competence in the trade.

The perfectionist has a tendency to take a long time to get a routine task done that the other performs rather quickly. They both have their strengths and weaknesses and are both well liked by their peers.

When the crap hits the fan and an emergency pops up I'll say this, it ain't the perfectionist that gets the call. Nothing wrong with his skill to perform the repair but sometimes ya just gotta get stuff done in a timely and cost effective manner.

One can not think outside the box and the other can. Like I said though, there ain't nothing wrong with either of them they just go about things differently is all.
__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 06:31 AM   #32
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,531
"If you are in "nowhere", you won't have a soldering iron or a piece of copper tubing to fit the wire. You won't have a cold chisel."

I have never seen even a 15 ft boat that had no toolbox , never mind a cruiser with a rational owner .

Even the smallest cruiser has a box of "goodies" for sometime projects.
FF is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 07:11 AM   #33
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
I am going to respect the moderator's request and drop this. I think rational readers can see through all the crap and make a good decision.
__________________

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012