Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-21-2017, 04:52 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
ak-guy's Avatar
 
City: Gustavus, AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Troll Hunter
Vessel Model: Allweather
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 101
Bonding Questions

I like to think of myself as a moderately smart guy but all the bonding/grounding information on the web has seriously confused me.

I have rewired my boat completely with no major problems or confusion except for bonding. It is a small 26' grp boat with a basic bonding system dating from early 80's when it was built. The bonding system connected an external hull zinc to the copper keel cooler to the engine block. The keel cooler also has a bolt on zinc. The stainless prop shaft/bronze prop w/zinc has a new flex coupling that it didn't have before so is isolated from the engine. The only other underwater part is the stainless rudder and shaft, not bonded but with a zinc.

The boat does not have a full AC system. I do have a permanently mounted hard wired marine battery charger but it is only connected via regular ac extension cord (household type plug). The boat will be kept on a mooring with only rare connection to shorepower.

From what I have read it seems I could remove the bonding wires and just have zincs on underwater metal.
__________________
Advertisement

ak-guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 09:57 PM   #2
Guru
 
Edelweiss's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1976 Californian Tricabin LRC
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,856
A lot of boats were never bonded by the manufacture. Mines a 1976 model, not bonded and permanently moored in saltwater with shore power running a smart charger full time.

I'm in the PNW, two zincs on both shafts and one on each rudder and they last a full boating season and I've never had any electrolysis on bronze thru hulls, which are not bonded. If it was originally bonded, then I would leave it. If not bonded and you're having no problems then leave it un-bonded.
__________________

__________________
Larry B
Careful . . .I Have a Generator and I'm not afraid to use it !
Edelweiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 06:31 AM   #3
Guru
 
Donna's Avatar
 
City: Palm Coast
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Southerly
Vessel Model: 1986 Marine Trader 36' Sundeck
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edelweiss View Post
A lot of boats were never bonded by the manufacture. Mines a 1976 model, not bonded and permanently moored in saltwater with shore power running a smart charger full time.

I'm in the PNW, two zincs on both shafts and one on each rudder and they last a full boating season and I've never had any electrolysis on bronze thru hulls, which are not bonded. If it was originally bonded, then I would leave it. If not bonded and you're having no problems then leave it un-bonded.
And this is one of the problems of being at a marina. You never know what kind of bonding if any the boat has next to you. I was replacing my zincs EVERY month so I decided to check my bonding. Lo and behold a thru hull fitting that was replaced 3 weeks ago in the Bahamas was showing some discoloration. Re-bonded/grounded, (even with copper screws) and left the marina.
Donna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 06:19 PM   #4
Guru
 
Bigsfish's Avatar
 
City: Miami River
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gotcha
Vessel Model: Grand Banks. Heritage. 54
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 2,095
I'm not sure there is a perfect answer to bonding. One boat I had for over 20 years had zero bonging. No problems.
Another boat was partly bonded (not 100%). No problems in 15 years.
Current boat is totally bonded. No problems after 3 years.
Bigsfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 07:02 PM   #5
Guru
 
Benthic2's Avatar
 
City: Boston Area
Country: United States
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,386
When I saw the thread title I figured I'd suggest holding hands around a camp-fire and singing "Kumbaya"..... but I guess we're talking about a different kind of bonding.....
Benthic2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2017, 06:18 PM   #6
Guru
 
foggysail's Avatar
 
City: Ashland, MA
Country: United States
Vessel Model: 1990 Silverton 40 aftcabin
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 976
If possible, folks should test their bonding using a half cell. There is an assortment of metals used, mine is a silver-silver chloride half cell but each type half cell has its own voltages as measure against different metals. the measured voltages give indication whether that particular metal is protected or not.

The advantage a half cell offers is that one can reasonably test each wetted metal that penetrates the hull into the surrounding water. Adding a sacrificial metal (anode) to exposed metals causes a negatively shift in the metal's voltage... ie, they are short circuited to the exposed metal. Electrons flow from negative to positive.....current's direction was defined back in the late 50's to flow from positive to negative and only confuses matters. The greater the negative voltage with reference to the half cell using a reference chart, the better protection that metal has to galvanic corrosion.
__________________

foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012