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Old 02-11-2015, 11:28 AM   #1
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City: montauk ny
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Battery Switch on Nordic tug

I have a 2006 Nordic Tug that is still a little new to us and am still leaning as much as I can. My knowledge on electrical and diesel engines is very limited at best.

I have two battery switches (BEP Marine Model 722) I understand that if my start batteries don't have enough power it will pull power from house batteries. I have a rocker switch on my dashboard that is tied into these switches. The switch on the left (Battery) has a steady LED light on. The switch on the right (Parallel) has a blinking LED light. Both switches appear to be in auto mode. If I need to use is it, do I just press the rocker switch on the dashboard? Do I need to reset anything after using it? If someone can explain this to me in layman's terms I would really appreciate any and all comments
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Old 02-11-2015, 02:00 PM   #2
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Hi,
I'm familiar with this set up on some English built boats.
If you have a flat starting battery the principal of the rocker switch is to group all available amps to start the motor, as soon as the motor fires evenly release the switch and the system will revert to normal charging, be aware however that the starting battery was initially too flat to start the engine so give the boat a good run to recharge the batteries.
With a twin engine boat, normally when one engine is running it should charge both starting batteries and after 15 mins or so be able to start the second engine.
PROVIDING the previous owner hasn't 'modified' the original installation.


Before you use the boat again, check all battery connections are cleaned absolutely pristine and coat the connections lightly with Vaseline(petroleum jelly).
Check the electrolyte levels in all the batteries, if necessary top up with distilled water. Use a good LED torch, DO NOT USE A NAKED LIGHT WHEN CHECKING THE BATTERIES ACID LEVELS.
Add it to your list of pre start list of checks.
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Old 02-11-2015, 04:07 PM   #3
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Battery switch on Nordic Tug

Thank you for responding Irish Rambler
Is the blinking light on the parallel switch and steady light on the battery switch normal? And do they mean anything?
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Old 02-11-2015, 09:38 PM   #4
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Google is your friend:

http://webserver.flak.no/vbilder/10438_1.pdf

Page 4 It's in layman's terms and English. :-)
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Old 02-12-2015, 12:05 AM   #5
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Do you have the owners manual that came with the boat originally? My Nordic manual has a fairly detailed wiring diagram that shows how all the batteries and switches are wired.

You also might try posting this on the SENTOA email list. Lots of Nordic Tug owners there that might have the same setup.

Wish I could help more, but my older Nordic has a different setup.
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Old 02-12-2015, 01:47 AM   #6
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There you go, Capt Bill has given you the link for the PDF file for the definitive description.
I omitted an explanation for any novice skippers as to why you don't use a naked flame to check electrolyte levels in a lead acid battery.
When batteries are charging they give off small amounts of gas, this gas (sulphuric) is highly flammable, even when the batteries are not charging there may be tiny pockets of gas in the cells of the battery, use clear goggles to protect your eyes, you can get a pair as cheap as chips from a builders/DIY store.
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Old 02-12-2015, 07:42 AM   #7
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Thank you all for your suggestions. Yes I do have the manual, and I also understand the danger of acid batteries.
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