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Old 11-20-2012, 05:16 PM   #21
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psneeld

By my count there are about 330 vessels in the Caribbean today with AIS on, excluding the 325 moving around the Canal Zone. Talk yourself out of safety gear, but don't try to convince the rest of us AIS has "serious limitations." As an ex USCG flyer I'm a bit surprised by your stance. It certinly doesn't fit with the top USCG Admiral's position on AIS.

I well remember when radar for yachties was a "waste of $$, GPS would never work and EPIRBs were a nuisance and too expensive. Well, guess what -----
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:51 PM   #22
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psneeld

By my count there are about 330 vessels in the Caribbean today with AIS on, excluding the 325 moving around the Canal Zone. Talk yourself out of safety gear, but don't try to convince the rest of us AIS has "serious limitations." As an ex USCG flyer I'm a bit surprised by your stance. It certinly doesn't fit with the top USCG Admiral's position on AIS.

I well remember when radar for yachties was a "waste of $$, GPS would never work and EPIRBs were a nuisance and too expensive. Well, guess what -----
You have completely missed the point.... and there's another Caribbean cruiser that supports my way of thinking.

If you think the top USCG Admiral has any idea what us little guys do...you are overestimating the US Government that I had a great insight on for 23 years. Most USCG officers have very little experience with rec boats.

And I could care less about convincing you...I'm just passing along realistic experience on the water and on waters you may have or NOT have any knowledge of....and already had one other supporting comment from a member with lot's of experience in those waters.

Wow... 330 vessels in the whole Caribbean on AIS...I'll bet those are the only ones creating a hazard for cruisers down there...excluding 300 some more right around a known choke point...you just proved my point...

Plus I never said anything about those other technologies...now or before...

Sure buy and use AIS...just don't think it's all that "yachtie" mags say it is for a LOT of cruising. Sure in Heavy comm areas it's very useful...as a rec boater I avoid those areas just because of the collision issue...
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Old 11-21-2012, 10:20 AM   #23
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Just my two cents. We went from Norfolk across to Block Island. Crossing the New York shipping lanes, an AIS would have been really helpful. Yes, radar and MARPA are good, but AIS would have beeen much better. Same applies coming south and going into Hampton Roads.

It was a dark and stormy night coming into Galveston Bay with a partiallly unfurled jib, too windy to roll it out and try again. While tacking back and forth in the dark, AIS would have been really helpful to see which ships where moving and which where at anchor. Again, radar helped, but under the conditions really hard to keep track of all the targets.

Crossing the Gulf from Clear Water to Galveston, one night we picked up a target which looked like it would cross in front of us. He finally hailed us on the radio to let us know that he was trailing 8 miles of sonobuoys and we had the choice of really speeding up to get in front of him or to change course to 8 miles behind him. AIS would have helped us indentify him as a survey ship and also helped him to contact us directly.

While we have not done any long offshore cruising, in our experiene in coastal cruising, AIS is definitely worth having. Not sure it's worth that much in the Bahamas or Caribbean, other than to keep track of buddy boats.

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Old 11-21-2012, 10:44 AM   #24
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Don't underestimate the value of "being seen" that a Class B transceiver adds to the equation. Watch standers aboard US Navy ships certainly do acknowledge and track them as they pick them up. I've spent many watches aboard US aircraft carriers and maintaining target contacts was always our highest priority.
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Old 11-21-2012, 01:29 PM   #25
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Where did you refueled in the North of South America. I´m afraid because I have just about 700/800 miles of autonomy and agains stream from up to 3 miles.
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Old 11-21-2012, 01:52 PM   #26
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Larry M
Where did you refueled in the North of South America. I´m afraid because I have just about 700/800 miles of autonomy and agains stream from up to 3 miles.
We fueled in Fortaleza and then Trinidad (this trip was a sailboat). We stopped in French Guyana but there were no fuel docks but fuel was available close by. Take a look at the current charts. You will be facing a north west setting current of about 1 knot average from Trinidad to about 7 degrees south. Maybe 55 gallon drums on the back deck?
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Old 11-21-2012, 07:04 PM   #27
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O already bought a cage tank that can fit 275 gals. I'll need some place to refuel.
In my 4 tanks, I can fit almost 800 gals.
I'm going tomorrow to Fort Lauderdale to fix and instal the rest that is missing and I'll make a sea trial and a chart of consumption.

Sergio "Alemao" Sztancsa, Sent from my iPhone using Trawler
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Old 12-05-2012, 02:39 PM   #28
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I thought I would pass this along. I just received this from some friends who were on their way from Morehead City to St. Augustine. Paul & Chris have sailed from Seattle to FL and Nova Scotia to FL plus some. Not rookies. They do have AIS on their Outbound 44.

...Now comes the exciting part. At about 4am we were motor sailing 32 miles offshore approaching Cape Fear. There was some moon, but the overcast skies made for a dark night. I was on watch, while Chris was sleeping in the starboard bunk. Crunch! The sound was like the old soda and beer cans, when they were thicker than todays paper thin ones, being stomped on on the sand. A metal crush muffled sound. I jumped up and pulled the throttle back to idle. Chris jumped up and reinserted her heart back into her chest. Having a medical background can be helpful in these situations. I looked behind me and there was 20-25ft cabin cruiser style fishing boat a few hundred feet off my stern. No lights! Just the gray looking outline of a white boat in the dark. It looked like a boat that was abandoned or just drifting. I turned the boat around to investigate. Then the green and red running lights turned on on the boat. I tried raising them on the radio, but no response. Eventually we came up close enough to yell to them, “Are you OK?” They said yes. We then yelled at them to pick up channel 16 on the radio. After a brief, somewhat strange conversation, he said he was fine, that we didn’t need to stand by.
Looking at our boat showed no damage. The best I can figure out is that we did a glancing blow with our 77lb Spade anchor on our bow. I had the Radar running at the time with a 2 mile guard zone. It is supposed to sound an alarm if anything enters the zone. This boats radar signature was just too small. Night watches became even more diligent from then on.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:19 PM   #29
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And AIS would have been of no value whatsoever in this incident since the other boat didn't have it. Radar, yes, eyeballs, yes. But AIS, no.

Which is one reason we have not bothered to get it. Other than being able to find out the name and destination of "that container ship over there," we so far see no value in it for the kind of boating we do here. When the visibility is low we use whichever of the three VTS services apply to our location if we are in an area with commercial shipping. And we use our radar all the time regardless of the visibility.

We can certainly envision situations or locations where AIS would be invaluable on a recreational boat, but these waters do not strike us being one of them.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:55 PM   #30
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I thought I would pass this along. I just received this from some friends who were on their way from Morehead City to St. Augustine. Paul & Chris have sailed from Seattle to FL and Nova Scotia to FL plus some. Not rookies. They do have AIS on their Outbound 44.

...Now comes the exciting part. At about 4am we were motor sailing 32 miles offshore approaching Cape Fear. There was some moon, but the overcast skies made for a dark night. I was on watch, while Chris was sleeping in the starboard bunk. Crunch! The sound was like the old soda and beer cans, when they were thicker than todays paper thin ones, being stomped on on the sand. A metal crush muffled sound. I jumped up and pulled the throttle back to idle. Chris jumped up and reinserted her heart back into her chest. Having a medical background can be helpful in these situations. I looked behind me and there was 20-25ft cabin cruiser style fishing boat a few hundred feet off my stern. No lights! Just the gray looking outline of a white boat in the dark. It looked like a boat that was abandoned or just drifting. I turned the boat around to investigate. Then the green and red running lights turned on on the boat. I tried raising them on the radio, but no response. Eventually we came up close enough to yell to them, “Are you OK?” They said yes. We then yelled at them to pick up channel 16 on the radio. After a brief, somewhat strange conversation, he said he was fine, that we didn’t need to stand by.
Looking at our boat showed no damage. The best I can figure out is that we did a glancing blow with our 77lb Spade anchor on our bow. I had the Radar running at the time with a 2 mile guard zone. It is supposed to sound an alarm if anything enters the zone. This boats radar signature was just too small. Night watches became even more diligent from then on.
I don't know what a "20-25ft cabin cruiser style fishing boat " is, but if they didn't bother to turn on their anchor light, I doubt they would have turned on an AIS transciever even if they had one on board. As rare as an AIS receiver is on small boats, a transciever is far more rare.

As far as radar, fiberglass doesn't show up on radar very well. Some folks install a metal radar reflector to improve the radar visibility on their fiberglass boats.
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