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Old 11-19-2019, 03:46 PM   #41
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With 300 gallon fuel tanks one would think that up to 30 gallons, 10% should not make any difference, but I want to cross the 'T's and dot the 'i' before the next oil change.
You wouldn't have anything like 30 gallons to get rid of in your vessel
We only have 10 per change

Surely you'd be more like 3 gallons so 1% oil to fuel ratio.
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Old 11-19-2019, 03:52 PM   #42
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You wouldn't have anything like 30 gallons to get rid of in your vessel
We only have 10 per change

Surely you'd be more like 3 gallons so 1% oil to fuel ratio.
agreed 3 gallons per engine x 2. 6+1 from trans. 7 gallons
I used 30 gallons for ease of calc. an insignificant amount either way blended in after being filtered through at least 5 micron filters. It does not 'seam' to be a problem, still looking for the proof of why not do it. No oil change planned until next fall, time to research and plan.
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Old 11-20-2019, 05:05 PM   #43
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One of the local trucking company's use to blend in used motor oil at a 10% factor. It was a simple side tank that consist of two racor style fuel filters. They pulled the unit around 2000 stating modern high pressure diesel injection units would not warranty systems using diesel/oil blends. They were changing out from Big Cam 400's to mostly Detroit 60 series engines at that time. I know its not much help but thought I would toss it out there.
If it was up to me and I had a older low pressure diesel I would probably still not run it. I see no problem in running it in something that had a day blended tank, but tossing 7 gallons of oil into a 300 gallon diesel tank would have me concerned if it would stay blended or separate over time. I could see problems with a transfer pump and main injection pump if your pumping separated 15/40.
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:16 PM   #44
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Yeah, even though I know an 855 will run on vomit and we'd be tipping 40 litres of relatively clear looking oil on top of 4000 litres of diesel I am not really prepared to chance it to get an extra 40 litres or $64 worth of "free" fuel.
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:58 PM   #45
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Advance Auto Parts in the US takes old oil. Are there any up north or similar?
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Old 11-20-2019, 07:08 PM   #46
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Advance Auto Parts in the US takes old oil. Are there any up north or similar?


I am at 43rd parallel and that is where i take my oil. But im nowhere near BC. They ask now exactly what is in the container. AF is a big no-no. Interestingly, NY says ok to dump AF in the sewer system, at least for personal use. Not the drainage system though.
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Old 11-20-2019, 07:50 PM   #47
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If you go that route I think I would add the oil while at the refueling dock so the new fuel will help mix the oil into the diesel in the tank.

I looked up the BC Recycling page up and I see a telephone number that you could call
1-800-667-4321.

That may be of more help than a webpage that is not always up to date. If already done then just ignore.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:03 PM   #48
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A commercial fuel dock should take your oil. Commercial boats often change their oil at a fuel dock. The docks have a pump with a long line that can pump directly out of the engine. But you'd need to buy your new oil from them.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:33 PM   #49
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A commercial fuel dock should take your oil. Commercial boats often change their oil at a fuel dock. The docks have a pump with a long line that can pump directly out of the engine. But you'd need to buy your new oil from them.
I used to do my oil changes at the Chevron barge in Coal Harbour (downtown Vancouver). But then they were not the last remaining fuel barge. Now, they are so busy with commercial fueling that they won't have pleasure boats occupying the sides of the barge. Their suction hose doesn't reach to the small attached float at the end of the barge where pleasure boats must tie.
I now do my own with a vacuum pump and dispose of my oil at the YC or at the auto parts store in Ganges.
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Old 11-21-2019, 07:19 AM   #50
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The instruction sheet for my Floscan specifically advises against using used oil in the fuel due to likelihood of obscuring the scanning optics. I take my used oil to any local oil change facility where it is accepted without question. I poured a few gallons of it into the nearly full tanks of my trawler (no Floscan installed) back in the day - in was running 2-micron filters in the Racors to my 120 Lehmans. No issues with smoke or anything else. I am not about to do that with this 315 HP 6LPA Yanmar sucking diesel at 8-9 GPH (pushing over twice that through the system when counting the return fuel), even with 2-micron filters.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:52 AM   #51
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There are so many variables in this discussion it becomes a bit obscure what is acceptable and what is not. There is not one simple answer. I commend some of you using bypass filtration, special 1 or two micron oil and fuel filters and Lepke centrifuging his used oil and coming up with a clear and pretty clean product to mix with diesel for a few reasons, one of the biggest being to get rid of it. So for facts. I haven’t seen anyone comment on the contaminants in used engine oil like acids, heavy metals, and a list of toxic compounds from combustion. Those corrosive compounds are one of the reasons for changing oil at regular intervals.

Now for a bit more opinion. I doubt you can get those compounds out of used engine oil by any of the methods mentioned. Depending on the cleanliness of the used oil to start with, I would be very cautious. Putting it into an older Cummins or Detroit unit injector system or any old low pressure injectors for that matter will probably not cause much harm. I would be very leery of doing it on a very finicky and expensive newer common rail system because of the potential for corrosion from that used oil sitting in the precise injector components. Now if you saved up your used oil and clean it and when under way on a long trip add it in knowing that tank of fuel will be burned and replaced with clean diesel before the engine gets parked for another year, might make a difference.
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Old 11-25-2019, 08:47 AM   #52
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I have found that auto repair shops will take used oil. Some may charge a buck a gallon, but it is worth that to get rid of it.
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Old 11-25-2019, 01:22 PM   #53
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There are so many variables in this discussion it becomes a bit obscure what is acceptable and what is not. There is not one simple answer. I commend some of you using bypass filtration, special 1 or two micron oil and fuel filters and Lepke centrifuging his used oil and coming up with a clear and pretty clean product to mix with diesel for a few reasons, one of the biggest being to get rid of it. So for facts. I haven’t seen anyone comment on the contaminants in used engine oil like acids, heavy metals, and a list of toxic compounds from combustion. Those corrosive compounds are one of the reasons for changing oil at regular intervals.

Now for a bit more opinion. I doubt you can get those compounds out of used engine oil by any of the methods mentioned. Depending on the cleanliness of the used oil to start with, I would be very cautious. Putting it into an older Cummins or Detroit unit injector system or any old low pressure injectors for that matter will probably not cause much harm. I would be very leery of doing it on a very finicky and expensive newer common rail system because of the potential for corrosion from that used oil sitting in the precise injector components. Now if you saved up your used oil and clean it and when under way on a long trip add it in knowing that tank of fuel will be burned and replaced with clean diesel before the engine gets parked for another year, might make a difference.



I had to look this up. Common rail and standard IP fired injectors use the same max psi of around 30,000psi at WOT. The common rail holds a low psi of 8500 to 10,000psi at low idle where standard injectors with mechanical IP can drop as low as 2500 psi. If an engine has an electric pump, or a pump not using engine rpm to build pressure, then it maintains up to 30,000 psi or something close.



One thing I didn't know was that common rail isn't a new idea. It's been used since at least the '20s. The fuel pump builds the fuel pressure and a secondary system trip the injectors. Some systems use the camshaft. I think Detroits use a similar system. I'm mainly familiar with the older automotive style from back in my auto tech days. Like Mercedes, VW, Cummins in Dodge trucks. They all used mechanical IPs and the injectors pop open to spray fuel above a certain psi. Once the engine builds speed the injectors are held open further and longer by the building psi to increase fuel flow into the combustion chamber. As simple as it seems, it all has to be balanced and calibrated to run at it's peak.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:12 PM   #54
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How Clean Is Your Fuel?

https://polarislabs.com/how-clean-is-your-fuel/

I am sure most have a 2 micron filter to clean the fresh from pump diesel. Or the fuel sitting in the tank growing micro-organisms.

Diesel fuel is made from crude oil. (so is motor oil.)
Diesel fuel is refined from crude oil at petroleum refineries. U.S. petroleum refineries produce an average of 11 to 12 gallons of diesel fuel from each 42-gallon (U.S.) barrel of crude oil.


Mixing Used Motor Oil with Diesel Fuel
The process of mixing used motor oil with diesel fuel is actually very simple. The first thing you need to consider is the cleanliness of the used oil you want to use. Be sure that it is stored in a clean container, and closely observe the oil for signs of water and antifreeze. Neither of these liquids will mix with the oil, so they should be very visible to the naked eye. If your oil is contaminated with either and any type of engine rust, you will not be able to use it. Once you have determined that you are using a generally uncontaminated supply of used oil, you need to filter it. An ordinary paint filtering system works well. Use a large (10 to 20 gallons) bucket, and slowly pour the oil into it. The filtering system will remove most of the impurities and smooth out the texture of the oil. Now you are ready to mix your oil with the diesel fuel. The first time you attempt to use oil in your vehicle, mix only about 10 percent oil with about 90 percent diesel fuel. The limit to how much oil your vehicle can comfortably run on will grow, but you need to wean it to the new fuel mixture. You can listen to the engine and check the smoke coming out of the tailpipe to determine how your vehicle is handling the transition. If the engine is a good deal louder than usual, making clanking sounds or producing a black exhaust, then you need to dial down the amount of oil you are using. Gradually up the oil content to an 80/20 mixture. Monitor your vehicle’s performance, as every engine adjusts differently. Many automobiles are capable of running mixtures all the way up to 50/50 after a great deal of progression. Do some research on your vehicle to see how other owners have fared with running oil in their engines. The sites listed in the Resources and References sections of this article have forums where you can interact with other drivers who are operating with oil/diesel mixtures. You results may not always match theirs, but it gives you a good template of what to expect in terms of performance. If you find that your vehicle is not running as efficiently, speed or power is degenerating or the engine is running loudly and burning dirty exhaust, you need to reevaluate your mixture.


Thanks for all the opinions. It appears that whether done in a plant somewhere or DIY, recycling used oil will become the norm for as long as we continue to use fossil fuels.
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