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Old 01-09-2017, 10:28 AM   #1
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Video of Rosborough/Seaway head?

Looking for a video of Rosborough 246 and a Seaway 25 head to see if there really is room for showering. Anyone have a link to something? Anyone have a minute to make a video of it? Maybe even someone standing in it for reference?

None of these boats are near me, so I am swinging for the fences.

Thank you.

Robert
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Old 01-09-2017, 11:03 AM   #2
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FWIW, the head in our Bounty is fairly narrow. We had a shower there, but it was tight, and required a fair amount of cleanup/drying after a shower. We had been showering in the cockpit too, and there was quite a difference.

Decided to stick with the cockpit shower after several tries in the head, and even removed the shower plumbing in the head. Much roomier, no cleanup. Even cruising SE Alaska the cockpit shower is pleasant most days. When we're at a marina, we shower on land.
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Old 01-09-2017, 11:58 AM   #3
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You could contact Wefing's Marine. They are a dealer for Rosborough and may have the info you want. Link Wefing's Marine - Simply The Best

If you get the photo or video, could you post it here? I am considering a Rosborough and I too question the space in the head compartment.
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Old 01-11-2017, 06:47 AM   #4
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We looked at a new Rosborough under construction last year and they were putting a shower in next to the v-berth and head. It can work, but is tight. We ended up buying an older Rosborough with a cockpit shower. We like it very much, and with our canvas can complete enclose the cockpit for privacy.
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Old 01-11-2017, 06:56 AM   #5
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Thank you everyone. It looks crazy tight. A fast hot shower is important to the bride.

Thank you again.
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Old 01-12-2017, 05:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry H View Post
You could contact Wefing's Marine. They are a dealer for Rosborough and may have the info you want. Link Wefing's Marine - Simply The Best

If you get the photo or video, could you post it here? I am considering a Rosborough and I too question the space in the head compartment.
Larry--I spoke with Marc at Wefings, he is a great guy. He did not have any pics I was looking for. However, he did go out and take a couple to answer my questions. He sent them to me in a link with others, but it looks like you need permissions for it. Give him a buzz and let him shoot you the link. Marc was a great guy to chat with.

Good luck with your decision.

Robert
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:00 PM   #7
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I've always used ATF in my steering system as directed by Harbor Marine where I bought the system components. I have a SeaStar Capalano helm w an adjustable rate pump and an equally large slave cylinder. My hydraulic hose is orange industrial hose usually found on back hoes. I installed the hose and routed it such that the only low spots were just ahead of the slave cylinder low in the lazerette. This way the hose rises steadily all the way to the helm pump. So if there's air in the cylinder it goes out the cylinder and down immediately to the lowest point in the hose .. and then ahead some because of the large slave cylinder volume. It's then in a position to migrate up the hose to the helm pump.

So I turn the helm all the way one way and left it hard over overnight or for some lesser time. Next I turn the helm all the way over the other way. This way any air has many hours to migrate up the hose to the helm pump .. and it does. I know of course when all the air is out when the fluid level stays the same over time. It's a little hard to keep the hose straight enough to not trap any air when you're putting it in.

I put the system in 10 years ago and two years ago I changed the fluid. It was as easy to bleed as it was in the first place. By the way the oversized components were probably not necessary. But I have a big rudder and eventually knew I'd be in big following seas in a place like Chatham Strait where hours of heavy use would probably be necessary.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:02 PM   #8
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Nomad--It was head, not helm. 😀 Thank you though for the great description.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
I've always used ATF in my steering system as directed by Harbor Marine where I bought the system components. I have a SeaStar Capalano helm w an adjustable rate pump and an equally large slave cylinder. My hydraulic hose is orange industrial hose usually found on back hoes. I installed the hose and routed it such that the only low spots were just ahead of the slave cylinder low in the lazerette. This way the hose rises steadily all the way to the helm pump. So if there's air in the cylinder it goes out the cylinder and down immediately to the lowest point in the hose .. and then ahead some because of the large slave cylinder volume.

So I turn the helm all the way one way and left it hard over overnight or for some lesser time. Next I turn the helm all the way over the other way. This way any air has many hours to migrate up the hose to the helm pump .. and it does. I know of course when all the air is out when the fluid level stays the same over time. It's a little hard to keep the hose straight enough to not trap any air when you're putting it in.

I put the system in 10 years ago and two years ago I changed the fluid. It was as easy to bleed as it was in the first place. By the way the oversized components were probably not necessary. But I have a big rudder and eventually knew I'd be in big following seas in a place like Chatham Strait where hours of heavy use would be be necessary.
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