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Old 12-06-2012, 07:12 PM   #21
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My son and I had a Mac 26X for a couple of years until Katrina took it away. Size considered, the interior was well thought out and emminently usable for a couple of people guys for a weekend. We'd routinely get 15-16 k deballasted on the motor - 12 with full ballast. Trailered like a champ and easy on/off (15 min either way). A very tender boat - the first 15 degrees of heel could be induced by the wake of a passing duck until the water ballast kicked in. However, we had her in some fairly substantial weather and she performed well; but it's a real wet ride.
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:06 PM   #22
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dj.....

Light boats can be done, but it takes mindset and discipline.....We currently have a 40' by 8' boat under construction that is supposed to come in at about 5500 pounds. She will do 12mph with a 25HP Volvo diesel at that weight. A lot of this boat is empty and must stay that way to keep weight in control. Human tendency is to add "improvements", as Dick Newick calls "inconveniences". You can have fast, light, or cheap....just pick any two.

The McGregor does not pump ballast, it's a gravity powered system. There is one open/shut valve in the transom, that's it. You launch the boat, open the valve, ballast tank fills, close the valve. To drain you must either open the valve above about 5 knots, or put the boat on the trailer.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:14 PM   #23
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The first name for trawlers was "HeavyCruiser" so you really can't have a trailerable trawler as the weight gets out of hand. But you can have all manner of trawler styled cruisers that if under 8.5' can be trailerable even w relatively heavy FG construction If "improvements" are very few. All chain rode and air conditioning NNA.

In the late 50s a Seattle based boat manufacturer (Bryant) made many OB cruisers in plywood that were powered w two 35hp OMC outboards, not very narrow and were 21' long, probably bigger than a 22' Sea Dory. How would a 22' Sea Dory perform w 70hp?
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:29 AM   #24
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Our 1991 C-Dory 22 Cruiser had a 70 hp outboard at first. It worked well for shorter cruises, not too heavily loaded. Cruise 16-18 knots, WOT 28-30. When we loaded her up for weeks/months up in BC and SE AK and filled the 58-gallon fuel tank, the 70 wasn't adequate. We replaced it with a 90 and all was well.
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:27 AM   #25
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Thanks for popp'in up here Mr Cook.

Better than I thought but I want a bigger and somewhat slower boat like:

http://http://www.atkinboatplans.com...rs/Marcia.html

I have no need or desire to go 25 or 30 knots and I'm sure Marcia would run
12 to 15 w my 60 hp OB. Would be light enough w "mindset and discipline" as TAD suggests. The Sea Dory would sure be easy to build though. Do the flat bottom'ed Sea Dory's have any rocker to the bottom?
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:30 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VikingBay View Post
The Ranger tug is a locally made boat that I have seen in person and find to be a very nice boat. Their R-27 is 6200 dry and would be easily trailerable.
A friend of mine has ferried some of these up into BC for their owners. Very nice boat in his opinion and they are very trailerable if you have an appropriate tow vehicle. The show-stopper is the price, which is pretty staggering for what you get even if it is well designed and made. For the price of a new Ranger you could get a really nice used "real" boat, even something like a GB. A Ranger is definitely something you want to buy used as I'm told their initial depreciation hit is very high and the boat should come down to a much more realistic figure in a fairly short time.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:06 PM   #27
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TAD,
Thanks for the info on the McGregor.
The 40' w 25hp must be interesting. I'll look for it on your web site.

Richard,
Since you've had extensive experience w the Sea Dory have you ever slid down the face of a big wave broadside? As I recall the SD has the double chine "sampan" type of hull does it not?

Marin said,
"For the price of a new Ranger you could get a really nice used "real" boat, even something like a GB." Remember Marin a GB is a toy boat. And if I were a Ranger owner I'd be rather offended by your remark.
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Old 12-08-2012, 03:13 PM   #28
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Hi Eric,

Here's a link to C-Dory 22 Cruiser specs and pictures. No keel rocker, nor double chine IIRC. The bow is relatively rounded, so combined with very light weight it goes through big waves like a cork.

http://www.c-dory.com/boats/classic/...%20Cruiser.pdf

Don't have any experience of sliding down a wave sideways. We got into following seas off Khaz head (west coast of Chichagof) in 96 that were 25-30 feet, and never went sideways or took any water over the bow. Huge swells from the SW built twice as high by the shallowing sea floor there, plus a 20-knot wind. Came out of Piehle Passage into 10-footers, and then turned north rather than retrace our steps through a narrow opening blocked by a huge kelp patch. It had blocked our water intakes, caused the main engine to overheat, and forced us to fire up the kicker and keep heading out into ever larger waves. After 10-15 minutes the big motor cooled enough to run w/o heat alarm, and we worked our way north to the mouth of Khaz Bay. We did have to turn SW again for a mile or so and then zig-zag back N, as the waves had been driving us closer and closer to the many boomers just offshore along the coast - and they were really booming!

I guess we should not have come out into them in the first place, but did not realize they were there. Other than working the throttle as we went down into the troughs and then up again, and watch aft for unusually big ones, the main thing we had to do was keep our fear under control.
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