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Old 10-06-2013, 09:26 PM   #1
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Trailables or not

New to trawler forum... could anyone tell me about the trawlers that are trailable. We are looking when we retire to go trawler instead of a sailboat.
Do you like them? How hard to take in and out of the water? Is it cheaper to trailer than to dock for a couple of months? Hope to hear widgets
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:17 PM   #2
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The Swedish Albin is probably the best trailerable trawler out there but there are many others but a lot of them probably shouldn't be called trawlers. What a boat can do is important. What a boat is called is not.

If you're a good driver and have an appropriate truck and trailer all should go well.

Basically any boat less than 8'6" is easily trailered and as I recall only "wide load" signs are needed up to 10' beam. Wider than that is considered too much trouble for most people.

The biggest problem towing may not be width but weight. Both for stopping and pulling the load. Give much much more space to the next vehicle and go a lot slower than you usually drive your car.
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:40 PM   #3
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Check out ranger tugs. Trailerable and sharp. Compact as well.
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:03 PM   #4
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Check out ranger tugs. Trailerable and sharp. Compact as well.
Rangers are too much for us... Nice boats
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:51 PM   #5
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If I remember correctly the 26' Nordic tugs were trailerable. There was a multi year gap in production of these boats but there are many of the older ones around.

There is also the Rosborough.

Then you get into the boats like C-dory and similar boats which are often o/b powered but definitely trailerable. I see quite a good number of them in my travels up the coast.

But with all of them you must know the LOADED weight ,in addition to the beam, to figure out what kind of truck and trailer you will need to tow safely. The right one will be no worse than any RV on the road.

Last year we saw a couple sitting on the back deck of their 25' Ranger Tug RV at the Flying J truck stop at Lodi, Cal. and again at Barstow Flying J. We talked to them and they were headed for Florida. Apparently they had done the same trip the previous year. They were cruising both wet and dry. They lived in Wash. and boated there in the summer and then headed for Fl. for winter cruising.

However for costs of moorage vs towing I can't really help. Consider the truck and trailer costs, fuel with a boat of ~8 -10,000 # and a diesel truck and you will be in the range of 10-12MPG. Gasoline truck will offer less mpg.

Where do you intend to use the boat.?

Anchoring will keep overnighting cost down of course.

You need to answer a few, lots of, questions to yourselves about how much trailering is in the cards, what the tow vehicle and trailer will cost and where you want to visit and how you intend to use the boat.

I do see folk, every year, who trailer the boat from Wash. or Ore. and other places and then cruise for several weeks in an area like the Gulf Islands and the Broughtons towing in between. In many areas like this you must leave the tow vehicle as there are no roads or not convenient.
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Old 10-07-2013, 01:39 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by widgets View Post
New to trawler forum... could anyone tell me about the trawlers that are trailable. We are looking when we retire to go trawler instead of a sailboat. Do you like them? How hard to take in and out of the water? Is it cheaper to trailer than to dock for a couple of months? Hope to hear widgets
Cheaper is a relative term. Do you own the tow vehicle already? Two weeks ago my neighbor purchased a 2013 Dodge Mega Cab diesel truck, $60K.

I don't mean to insinuate that a brand new fully loaded truck is needed to tow with but the reality is my neighbor bought the vehicle because his previous one was not sufficient to tow his new toy hauler. I've seen this scenario repeated with friends and family many times buying something they where rated to tow only to find they needed more vehicle to do it safely later. Trailering is akin to docking, the better equipped and laid out you are in advance the easier the task is to perform.

Our boat is just under 10' wide and while it can be trailered, we do not own a tow vehicle so keep it berthed in the water. Jeffnick is the screen name of a member here with a great rig and well documented blog of his travels. Plug his name into the forum search engine and you'll get some great information from a guy doing exactly what you propose.
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Old 10-07-2013, 09:35 AM   #7
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Hi widgets,

Another trailer cruiser here - 44,000 nautical miles under the keel so far.

We started with a C-Dory 22 Cruiser, cruisng at first on Lake Powell and other big western lakes, then the San Juans and lower British Columbia coast. In a few years we had built the skills and experience to spend a summer in Southeast Alaska on our little cruiser. Many more summers in the PNW since then.

For more on this, particularly on choosing and equipping a trailerable cruiser, you could take a peek at my book, "Cruising in a Big Way". You can read a 28-page preview on the self-publishing site lulu.com, or a less extensive one on Amazon.

A few more trailerable cruisers worth considering: Sea Sport, Skagit Orca, Osprey. With a diesel engine these can go slow with great fuel economy and range, or power up to planing speeds when needed.

A used diesel pickup such as our Ram 2500 makes a great tow vehicle.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:38 PM   #8
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Richard,
I like the "so far" re the "under the keel".

I'm glad I met you in Thorne Bay as the opportunity may not come again. That happened w other TF members as well.

Also I'm glad you're still on TF too.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:56 PM   #9
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You might look into having a CDL company tow your boat... similar thing happens each year with Harleys... trucks with trailers bring Harleys to Daytona - owners drive or fly in then trucks return them after Bike Week... would depend on how often and how far you wanted to move your boat. Winter in Florida without having to buy and maintain a prime mover might be the lesser cost... and you could follow along in your car and have ground transportation... just an alternative to a seldom used monster truck...

here's one company - there are many others...

Save on Boat Shipping! - uShip
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:22 AM   #10
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Check out the Nimble Nomad Trawler. At 25' and 8'-6" beam it is very trailerable. Although I no longer trailer mine, I did trailer it alot with a 3/4 ton truck and its very easy to launch.
Quite a few used ones out there in the 20 to 30 thousand range.
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Old 10-20-2013, 03:47 PM   #11
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The Nimble Nomads and Vagabonds are simply wonderful as trailable trawlers; however, used 21' Ranger Tugs (old design and new design with the EC) can be found that are priced right. I actually prefer the look of the older 21' Ranger design. You don't see too many Nimble Vagabonds for sale--they were compact, nicely built, economical, and cruise well.
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