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Old 02-26-2013, 12:02 PM   #21
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[QUOTE=

Seriously, contact Captain Pat Rains. She has over 100K miles on Central American Coasts doing delivers (mostly power boats) with 30 plus canal transits. Her book details the stops, seasons, etc.

[/QUOTE]

What happened to John?
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:36 PM   #22
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I would second the comment on having the boat shipped directly to your home port. If it is coming from Asia, the incremental cost of adding the distance from CA to the East Coast may be less than you think, certainly less money (and way, way less time!) than bringing her on her own bottom. If you are interested in shipping, you can call Vic Spelberg, Peters & May. They specialize in shipping yachts, usually as deck cargo, from anywhere in the world to anywhere. He can get you costs, shipping dates, etc. You can google them to get to their website.

Note: I have no relationship with them, only a satisfied customer.

Good luck!
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Old 02-26-2013, 01:11 PM   #23
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What happened to John?
I don't know, I have never met him. Pat seems to be the one participates in the forums, writes the books and she has always been responsive to answering any questions we've had.
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Old 02-26-2013, 01:58 PM   #24
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You would also know from my life history, that my boat purchase is not "all talk", it WILL get done.
Good for you. It's not the dream that is important but how you get there. This, in a nutshell, is what I feel most of the cautionary comments are about. There is a concern that someone with little or no boating experience would contemplate (in the case of this thread) purchasing a large vessel and motoring from California to New England.

Let me expand on that. I have worked my way up to a 30', twin diesel, shaft drive boat. Not half the boat that many of the posters have. BUT, with the more complex mechanical and electrical systems there is a LOT more work keeping everything going. I can't imagine a 65'er. Keep in mind that when these big yachts were new, you can bet they weren't owner maintained other than the very basics. I've got quite a few hours on the ocean and I am in no way qualified for a journey such as this. These are my limitations and I do have some experience.

I know this is starting to sound like another negative thread but bear with me. Let's say the only vehicle you have ever driven is a Volkswagen with automatic transmission. Now go to Alaska and buy an 18 wheeler with B-train double trailers, load her up and head to the southern 48 at night in a snowstorm. I would do this in a heartbeat before making the trip you are contemplating.

I think what most are trying to tell you is that your path to your dream is not reasonable. There is no answer to your question posted here and boaters know that.

Finally, have you guessed what our biggest concern is? Your safety. Let me repeat that. We are concerned with your safety first and foremost. If you contemplate this trip please place the children in boarding school or with relatives for the duration of the trip. And trust me, I am not being flippant here. I am serious.

Good luck.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:04 PM   #25
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When I want to get a fairly close estimate of distance to travel, I use Google earth with the ruler tool. That being said, you have to ask questions like, Are we going to cruse 24/7? Do we have enough qualified crew to set up that kind of rotation? How much fuel and water as well as food storage will determine how long you can cruse between ports. On a trip that long I would think you would need to plan several over nights in port not only to refuel but to give the crew a chance to relax a bit. I would think that that kind if intensive 24/7 cruising requires a high level of constant concentration to keep clear of large traffic, watch for weather and monitor the mechanical condition of the vessel. I would think this level of passage requires much thought and planning. This would require the vessel to be in top notch condition. Even in near perfect condition, you would want a well thought out store of spare parts on board along with the mechanical knowledge to make repairs potentially while underway. These are just a few of the consideration that need to be made. I hope this post is helpful.

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Yes it was helpful. Thank you.
I guess I was hoping that a good captain could help with the planning aspect. I may end sticking to plan A, which was to ship her from Asia to Boston, but I wanted to weigh my options.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:06 PM   #26
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On a "new" (to you) boat the time will vary.

The boats mechanical condition , including fuel tanks is unknown.

How much time dead , replacing filters , and attempting to get underway is unknown.

The electrical system might be a problem too.

The suggestion to measure the miles then figure 6 nm per hour would be a start.

Unknowables like delays at the Canal, will have to be guessed at.

My guess 4-5 months if done as a delivery ,and everything keeps working and there are few mechanical delays.
Thanks for the time estimate. Your right, I would have to get the electric straightened out first. That might be an added hassle.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:18 PM   #27
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Hurricane season on the Pacific Coast, Manzanillo MX to Cabo and the Caribbean is June 1 to Nov. 1 (officially). These are the dates the insurance companies typically use. The danger months (95%) are around August 1 to mid October. Heading down the Pacific Coast is pretty easy spring or fall. The winter is OK but you need some patience. The Caribbean, the best time to travel is from Nov 1 till the Christmas winds/trades start around mid-December. The winds start to die off around late March/April. Someone else on the forum changed there plans to head south from Florida recently do to the winter winds. I'm not saying you can't do it in the winter, we're doing it, you just have to be patient for an appropriate weather window.

For my 2 cents, if you're short on time, do it in steps. There are places to leave the boat. It's a great trip and experiance. Not many people do it more than once.

Here's some weather for next week for Central America and Panama.
Good info. Thanks. That was one of my concerns also, the weather may interfere with my timing.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:47 PM   #28
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Yes it was helpful. Thank you.
I guess I was hoping that a good captain could help with the planning aspect. I may end sticking to plan A, which was to ship her from Asia to Boston, but I wanted to weigh my options.
A good captain COULD help a lot...that's why much of the advice has been to find one in your area and either buy a lot of beers or just go ahead and write the check. ither way...no one on the internet could possibly help with a trip that long and complicated...ESPECIALLY when you don't even have the boat yet.

Even if you tried to hire many a captain now...they would tell you to wait till you got your boat...everything else is just theory/ maybe's/ possibly's.
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:38 PM   #29
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GalaxyGirl, Do you now or have you ever owned a boat? If you're not experienced, this would be a huge, I'd even say dangerous, undertaking as a maiden voyage for boat and Captain.
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:18 PM   #30
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...I have to sift through replies and extract the good stuff, but it's worth it.
Trust me, we all have to do that (or should do it) on this forum!!!
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:48 PM   #31
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Anyone that is very determined to do something will usually find a way. It seems that GG is that determined. As long as the 5 little ones are safe, it will be the adventure of a lifetime.
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:59 PM   #32
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........ It is obvious to me, that not everyone, but some have real life experience and are willing to offer good advice to someone like me. I have to sift through replies and extract the good stuff, but it's worth it. I ignore the unhelpful feedback and focus on the folks who really now what they are are talking about.
My wife and I lived all our lives on the western Canadian prairies. I like to tell people that Saskatchewan is just like Kansas only flatter. 2-1/2 years ago now we bought Gray Hawk in Seattle. Prior to that our biggest boat was a 21' skiboat. Many people thought we had taken leave of our senses. Many more told us how much trouble we would have handling our new boat. I'm telling that story so you will have a sense that I have some understanding of what you are doing. And I applaud your courage - too many people never live their dreams. Obviously our 43 foot antique is nowhere near the vessel that you are purchasing but I hope you agree that we share some first hand knowledge of the challenges you will face.

Based on our experience I can guarantee you that at some point your boat will scare you big time, probably more than once. If you ease into ownership you will be prepared for those events and they will be learning experiences. If you move too fast they could kill you. Worse they could kill your kids. Only you will be able to assess how fast you can move along that curve.

We all learn according to a continuum. We start out unknowingly unknowledgeable, move to knowingly unknowledgeable, progress to consciously competent and hope to eventually become unconsciously competent. You are still in the unknowingly unknowledgeable stage. Please listen to the voices here that are concerned for your safety. If you won't listen to those who are concerned for your own safety, then listen to the concern for your children's safety.

When it comes time to get used to your new boat I personally would not want to do that in a strange port far away from home. You already know that you have some electrical challenges to overcome but rest assured that there are many other systems that will give you trouble. No matter how thoroughly you survey the vessel, when you start using it you will find problems. I would far rather find those problems in my home port with suppliers and vendors that I know and trust than in some foreign port where I am the outsider and have to deal with a language barrier on top of the actual problem I am trying to solve. YMMV.
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Old 02-26-2013, 06:59 PM   #33
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Good point about the insurance during hurricane season!! Here on the east Coast same dates apply and you would need to be north of Georgia by June 1 to get coverage at "normal" rates. Incidentally, GG should check out availability and cost of insurance for a boat this size for somebody with little/no experience. It may be very hard to buy or extremely expensive.
Good advice. That has been done. Thanks.
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:44 PM   #34
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I would second the comment on having the boat shipped directly to your home port. If it is coming from Asia, the incremental cost of adding the distance from CA to the East Coast may be less than you think, certainly less money (and way, way less time!) than bringing her on her own bottom. If you are interested in shipping, you can call Vic Spelberg, Peters & May. They specialize in shipping yachts, usually as deck cargo, from anywhere in the world to anywhere. He can get you costs, shipping dates, etc. You can google them to get to their website.

Note: I have no relationship with them, only a satisfied customer.

Good luck!
Thanks for the info. I had actually spoken to them. You reminded me. I was supposed to get back to them with the height of the vessel and I had forgoten. I think I will ring them tomorrow and get their quote, especially since the 2 quotes that I have are so far apart. It would be nice to have a 3rd.
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:56 PM   #35
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My wife and I lived all our lives on the western Canadian prairies. I like to tell people that Saskatchewan is just like Kansas only flatter. 2-1/2 years ago now we bought Gray Hawk in Seattle. Prior to that our biggest boat was a 21' skiboat. Many people thought we had taken leave of our senses. Many more told us how much trouble we would have handling our new boat. I'm telling that story so you will have a sense that I have some understanding of what you are doing. And I applaud your courage - too many people never live their dreams. Obviously our 43 foot antique is nowhere near the vessel that you are purchasing but I hope you agree that we share some first hand knowledge of the challenges you will face.

Based on our experience I can guarantee you that at some point your boat will scare you big time, probably more than once. If you ease into ownership you will be prepared for those events and they will be learning experiences. If you move too fast they could kill you. Worse they could kill your kids. Only you will be able to assess how fast you can move along that curve.

We all learn according to a continuum. We start out unknowingly unknowledgeable, move to knowingly unknowledgeable, progress to consciously competent and hope to eventually become unconsciously competent. You are still in the unknowingly unknowledgeable stage. Please listen to the voices here that are concerned for your safety. If you won't listen to those who are concerned for your own safety, then listen to the concern for your children's safety.

When it comes time to get used to your new boat I personally would not want to do that in a strange port far away from home. You already know that you have some electrical challenges to overcome but rest assured that there are many other systems that will give you trouble. No matter how thoroughly you survey the vessel, when you start using it you will find problems. I would far rather find those problems in my home port with suppliers and vendors that I know and trust than in some foreign port where I am the outsider and have to deal with a language barrier on top of the actual problem I am trying to solve. YMMV.
I can certainly appreciate your concern and the sentiment of experience. I do not plan to operate this boat myself. The plan is to hire a captain for the first 2-3 years at least. I will train and take plenty of courses for a long while until I feel consciously and unconsciously competent. Only then will I attemp to operate the vessel alone with help. I won't be a full time cruiser for about 5 years, so I believe that is ample time to learn.

I have also considered what you have discussed in regard to the mechanics and being away from home. Although the boat is a fairly late model with low engine hours, this is still weighing most heavily on my decision. Picking up a new-used boat for a long trip and not really knowing what it may need aside from what the surveyor has suggested and who knows how reliable that info will really be.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:04 PM   #36
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GalaxyGirl, Do you now or have you ever owned a boat? If you're not experienced, this would be a huge, I'd even say dangerous, undertaking as a maiden voyage for boat and Captain.
No. I havn't, but I think you may have missed earlier posts where I explained that I plan on using the boat as a liveaboard and hiring a captain to teach me for a few years. I may be adventurous and determined but not stupid or crazy and I would never put my kids in jeopardy.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:10 PM   #37
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A good captain COULD help a lot...that's why much of the advice has been to find one in your area and either buy a lot of beers or just go ahead and write the check. ither way...no one on the internet could possibly help with a trip that long and complicated...ESPECIALLY when you don't even have the boat yet.

Even if you tried to hire many a captain now...they would tell you to wait till you got your boat...everything else is just theory/ maybe's/ possibly's.
Understood. I was just toying with the idea and trying to get info while weighing my options to decide if I should further consider.

Clarification:
When I said that a good captain could help with the planing aspect I didn't mean on this forum, I just meant that if I decided to go the delivery route, I would expect a good captain that I have officially hired to help with planning.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:24 PM   #38
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Understood. I was just toying with the idea and trying to get info while weighing my options to decide if I should further consider.

Clarification:
When I said that a good captain could help with the planing aspect I didn't mean on this forum, I just meant that if I decided to go the delivery route, I would expect a good captain that I have officially hired to help with planning.
Help wih the planning is an understatement.....
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:43 PM   #39
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GalaxyGirl, I like your style!
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:21 AM   #40
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GalaxyGirl, one of the problems which might have lead to certain misunderstandings, is not all forum members read all the boards, let alone all the threads on all the boards. You have initiated quite a few threads on different boards, and on some you have briefly explained your situation, family set-up and so on, but assumed on others all have read that. Now I have looked up virtually all your posts, I have a better handle on where you are coming from, and why, but it was quite hard work. Might I suggest you put a succinct summary of the above in your profile. Then folk can quickly look that up, and get a better understanding of what is driving the queries. Just a thought...
And by the way, now I understand the plan, I can also understand the dream, and I like it. I would have liked to do something similar, but had to accept my spouse was not as keen, so it would not have worked. You appear not to be held back by anything except getting a boat and the knowledge to use it. If Mom (we say Mum) and kids are (figuratively for now) on board, then keep your eye on the prize...
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