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Old 08-13-2009, 08:14 AM   #1
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Time for a break from working on the boat.

We have made a lot of progress on the trawler conversion but I feel it is time to take a little break and use it a bit before the last push. *Plus I need to stop spending for a while and catch up on neglected things like kids health insurance! *

Yesterday I took it out of the marina and back down to the bay where she normally lives on a mooring. *Kids had fun and two of the guys that have been working on it came along for the day with a freind each. *Here are some pics.
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Old 08-13-2009, 09:24 AM   #2
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

What a great job you've done! Now, that's what I call "Trawlering!"
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Old 08-13-2009, 09:28 AM   #3
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Nice!* Be careful about the kids on what looks like the swim platform, the MAF's (Mothers Against Fun) will getcha.
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Old 08-13-2009, 05:58 PM   #4
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Thanks, their mum was actually asleep inside at that point. *But it would be me that would have to jump in and get them...........Anyway they have a healthy fear of falling in, especially the littlest one and they hold TIGHT
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Old 08-13-2009, 07:04 PM   #5
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Really neat and unique boat, Leon. Did everything run and operate as you'd hoped it would on your run home?
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Old 08-13-2009, 07:31 PM   #6
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Hi Marin, thanks for the feedback.* So far there are very few systems on the boat and most of the last series of work has been carpentry and painting.* Engine and drive train are working well, I now have a decent complement of gauges to monitor the engine and that lets me push it a bit a more, hydraulic steering is great now.* One thing we did was move the battery switches and now the engine battery struggles so I have to check and see if it is a poor connection or voltage drop due to longer cables.* There is still a lot of wiring to do now and also fit sink and cook top in the galley.* But I want to keep it on the mooring and use it weekends for the next few weeks.
Cheers, Leon.
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Old 08-13-2009, 08:00 PM   #7
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

I have a question about your boat's design. The bow is very high for the overall length of the boat. Are the waters in which this type of boat would have worked for a living rough enough to have caused this design feature to evolve? Or is it primarily an aesthetic feature that evolved over time?
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Old 08-14-2009, 09:27 AM   #8
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Time for a break from working on the boat.

Iv'e been wondering the same thing for some time. I know that any fish boat where the fisherman needs to lean over the side and work close to the water has a low freeboard. Real lobster boats come to mind. In a way fish boats don't have aesthetic features. There's nothing there that's not needed. But fishermen are a bit like birds** ..* they follow the flock. If it already has evolved that most fishermen have a Forfjord anchor on their bow, or an aluminum/hydraulic anchor winch a newcomer will do the same and perhaps it's mostly so he will become part of the group by employing such equipment. Also there's the old attitude that if it's good enough for old Hans Bjorg it's for darn sure good enough for me. Saves time on research. And then there's the attitude that if it looks right it brobably is right. Marin's new anchor winch wouldn't look right on a fish boat and Walts chrome Bruce anchor would humor the local fishermen so much that I'm afraid they would be falling off the dock laughing but most or all of us think it's beautiful or at least "awesome". One catches more fish fishing than researching equipment. And then there's the very practical and sage attitude that when most of the guys in the fleet have it or do it it's been proven in action and a guy just can't go wrong with it. Some fish boats have been the same for many decades and others are evolving constantly and have been since the 30s or longer. Bristol Bay gillnetters started out with sails and not too long ago 500 hp was vouge. I'll bet Leon's boat evolved over time and never had a designer that has a name. A fisherman gets w a builder and says "most other boats seem to have a problem in following seas w a full load of fish so lets make her a bit fuller in the stern to carry the weight". If it worked well it would be repeated and a change in the type would be implemented but very few would notice the difference. Conversly .. when they took the net reel off the stern of the gillnetter and put it on the bow everyone noticed. Well Leon, we've noticed your bow.

Eric Henning

-- Edited by nomadwilly on Friday 14th of August 2009 09:46:28 AM
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Old 08-14-2009, 01:31 PM   #9
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Time for a break from working on the boat.

Eric----

Your theory of the evolution of fishing boat shapes has a lot of*merit, I think. I don't necessarily agree with the theory that fishing boats don't have aesthetics. Granted, their basic form is dictated by the jobs they are being built to do, but sit in a warfside eatery in Maine or Prince Edward Island and listen to the conversations among the lobstermen and you will find that the appearance and lines of a working boat are still a major deal to them. You hear a lot of "Have you seen Pete's new boat yet? God, that thing is beautiful. The curve of the bow on that thing makes me want to cream my jeans." (An actual comment I remember for obvious reasons.)

Virtually all the PEI boats have a section of reverse sheer just aft of the bow. The boats I saw in Maine do not have this, their hulls are like Carey's (of this forum) in that it is one unbroken curve from stem to stern. When we stopped in Maine again on our way back from PEI, a lobsterman we spent a bit of time with looked at some of my pictures of the PEI boats and said he didn't understand why their boats had that "weird" reverse curve at the bow (I don't either--- I don't find it very good looking).

So I think aesthetics is still important in fishboat design and is appreciated when it's there. However aesthetics are probably increasingly over-ridden by the reality of*economics.* It's easier, faster, and cheaper to cut a straight line than a curved one, that sort of thing.

-- Edited by Marin on Friday 14th of August 2009 01:34:21 PM
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Old 08-14-2009, 07:07 PM   #10
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

OK Marin,
You got me fair and square. I should check my jeans no? I sure get tired of these grey aluminum things that are so popular up here. Even Navy grey looks better than the unfinished aluminum. I even agree w you on the reverse curve fwd sheer line. Some are beautiful but not the ones you saw at PEI.
Speaking of beauty I finally figured out why you guys are so goofy about the Flemming boats. They are beautiful! But the main reason you guys are talking about them is that they are surrounded by ugly ducklings. You may look at 100 boats in a magazine before you find one really good looking and it will probably be a Flemming. Its amazing how many boats out there are not attractive or even ugly.

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Old 08-14-2009, 07:51 PM   #11
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

To be fair, it's not just Fleming. There are similar designs by de Fever--- there is currently a de Fever 48 in Bellingham Marina near our slip and I think it's every bit as good looking as a Fleming. Maybe even more so because the de Fever has a bit more wood trim on the exterior (which is beautifully finished in this case) which in my opinon adds to the aesthetics of the boat. I have no idea how the build quality or interior configuration of the de Fever pilothouse/Portugese bridge boats compares to Fleming's boats.
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Old 08-14-2009, 09:05 PM   #12
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Marin,
de Fever's are nice looking boats but I've never seen one that could be called beautiful. Your GB is closer.

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Old 08-14-2009, 10:26 PM   #13
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

I could contribute* to this conversation and make a few points about DeFevers, (My brother had a 53 with a 6ft extended cockpit) but because I know there are people on this site that have Defevers and love them, I'll just say this. I love the Flemings!
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Old 08-15-2009, 11:44 PM   #14
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Walt, Marin,
I wondered about my comments on beauty of design and did a little survey. 1953, 1970 and 2009. There were many As from pictures in the 1953 magazine and no Es. 1970 brought no Es and no As. The 2009 pics produced 2 Es and 5 As. The As were, Park Isle 52, Nordhavn 46, GB Aleutian 59, the Flemings and the Eagle 40. The B catergory went to Nordic Tug, Camano 31, Krogen 42, Krogen Express 52, Kanter 62, Nordhavn 62, Eastbay 45, DeFever 52 and my favorite boat the Sea Spirit 60. I graded on visual mass/shape, ballance and lines. Many boats are more usefull than those that are more bueatiful. Many boats are pretty w lots of chrome and varnish. The Flemings got demerits for the slablike FB roof support that looks like it could have been cut out of a piece of plywood on a table saw. More or less invisible ss stanchion tubes could have been used. I was pleasantly supprised there were so many As and so few Ds. There were many Cs. I won't mention them as most folks w C boats think of them as B boats and of course there are many boats I didn't grade. The upshot is that the fleet is in much better shape than I had thought.

Eric Henning
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Old 08-17-2009, 06:53 AM   #15
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Hi Marin,

Sorry I have been away from a computer for a few days, weekends we stay at our beach place which is basic and not connected which is good actually. *Did some more boating with a crowd of neighbours and kids out on the boat on Sunday then a BBQ at the house.


Regarding the high bow it seems that generally it is to take the weight of the fish and ice as the bows come down a lot when they are loaded up. *Mine has an especially high bow for it's length, but it is from the other coast of Thailand so I am not sure if that is common or not over there.


I will take some pictures next time I am in town around the fishing port of some local boats showing the difference between loaded and unloaded as it can be quite extreme. *Boats that head further out to sea generally have higher bows to keep the waves out of the boat and the closer in they stay the flatter the sheer.


As mine is completely empty in the bow (apart from some concrete blocks) the bow is very high at the moment. *Once the bunks are built I plan to fit some tanks under them, water and an extra fuel tank for longer trips. *This may bring it down a bit but I still don't think it will go to the antifouled waterline.


Cheers, Leon.
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Old 08-17-2009, 11:33 AM   #16
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Time for a break from working on the boat.

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:

Marin,
de Fever's are nice looking boats but I've never seen one that could be called beautiful. Your GB is closer.
Eric---* Here is a shot of a deFever 48*I pulled off the web.**I have to agree that it is not as sleek as the Fleming.* But it's not too bad.* Again, I know nothing about the quality of these boats so I'm going strictly on the way they look.* I do know something about the quality of a Fleming---- its roots are in the Alaskan/Grand Banks lines of American Marine way back when.*

The one in the photo looks more blocky than the one I saw in our marina a few weeks ago.* The one I saw looked much more "Fleming-like" with a Portugese bridge, raised pilothouse (I think),*etc.* It wasn't there this past weekend so it's either out or gone.* If it comes back I'll try to get*a photo of it.


*


-- Edited by Marin on Monday 17th of August 2009 11:37:36 AM
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:21 PM   #17
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

MarinDoes this look more like the Defever in Bellingham?
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:46 PM   #18
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Carey,
Now that is the best looking Defever. I could lust after that boat. Look at the pics. See how much better looking it is than Marin's Defever. I usually consider DeFevers and most Krogens to appear too top heavy. It may be the photo itself but this DeFever in your picture does not seem to have high mass. The opposite of the high mass boats are the Eagles. I love them but thier visual low mass is such that they have a tug like appearance. Perhaps they consider them to be a "tug yacht" and it is incorporated into the design to that end.

Eric Henning
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:50 PM   #19
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

EricI agree. That is one of Defever's best designed boats. I believe it was produced in 46 and 48 foot. Maybe more. Definitely one of my top choice boats.
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Old 08-17-2009, 06:01 PM   #20
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RE: Time for a break from working on the boat.

Quote:
Carey wrote:

Marin
Does this look more like the Defever in Bellingham?
Yes, that's it.* I thought I had read the manufacturer's name and "48" on it but I could be mistaken.* Perhaps it's longer than 48.'* The one I saw was in the slip right next to the Nordhavn "Prime Time" on C-dock (I think).* It has a centrifugal wiper in the center windshield panel.* I don't recall the name.* I have no idea what year it is but it was in what seemed like immaculate condition.

*
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