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Old 03-18-2013, 03:02 PM   #41
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Yep, I came in Depoe Bay once on a fishing trip, not me at the helm. Ay yi yi! And it was a pretty nice day supposedly. Rudy Inlet in Virginia has many similarities, another white knuckled even when you are a passenger and the guy at the helm has done it a hundred times. Tillamook has been a certified killer. It is not unusual for the CG to close the bar on a number of those Oregon inlets. Did you know we have an Oregon Inlet here in NC? Can be nasty and has a serious shoaling problem, leads to from major sport and commercial fishing grounds.
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Old 03-18-2013, 03:03 PM   #42
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Great video's, thanks.

How many boats get into the rocks there?
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Old 03-18-2013, 03:09 PM   #43
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Yep, I came in Depoe Bay once on a fishing trip, not me at the helm. Ay yi yi! And it was a pretty nice day supposedly. Rudy Inlet in Virginia has many similarities, another white knuckled even when you are a passenger and the guy at the helm has done it a hundred times. Tillamook has been a certified killer. It is not unusual for the CG to close the bar on a number of those Oregon inlets. Did you know we have an Oregon Inlet here in NC? Can be nasty and has a serious shoaling problem, leads to from major sport and commercial fishing grounds.
Oregon type bar in NC???...Naw, that sissy water in NC... .....
Which inlet is it? I heard mention in a conversation of a place in NC like you describe but don't remember the location. Just remember it surprised me cause I wasn't aware of anything like that in NC.
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Old 03-18-2013, 03:10 PM   #44
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Great video's, thanks.

How many boats get into the rocks there?
don't know, Did you watch the 2nd video of the charter boat Endeaver entering Depoe Bay? I thiunk they smacked the rocks twice on the way in.
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:03 PM   #45
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To complicate matters, in relation to your direction of travel, waves seldom come from a direction that is the most comfortable for you. Quartering seas are usually the most uncomfortable and can be dangerous. For instance we use the Ft. Pierce Inlet. It is fairly deep, but not too wide and jettyed on both side. With winds out of the southeast or northeast against an ebbing tide there will be breakers diagonally across the inlet. That calls for some fast corrections. Try to get straight to take them squarely on the stern. Then apply power and turn back straight with the inlet. Do this until safely inside. The first time Lou came in that way her eyes were as big as saucers. That is when gobs of power is not too much.

Even running off shore it may be necessary to tack to get home. If the seas are not dangerous, the angle of attack may just be uncomfortable. Whatever it is getting use to the motion and characteristics of your boat is vitally important.
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:13 PM   #46
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Oregon type bar in NC???...Naw, that sissy water in NC... .....
Which inlet is it? I heard mention in a conversation of a place in NC like you describe but don't remember the location. Just remember it surprised me cause I wasn't aware of anything like that in NC.
No, that's the name of the inlet : Oregon Inlet. You think they's rename one of the OR ones carolina Inlet just to reciprocate.

We have several here that are difficult to impossible in deep draft boats or require very precise local knowledge and the latest USACE surveys. Oregon Inlet has big economic implications both recreational and commercial fishing, so gets a lot of political attention. Hatteras inlet too, not quite as much traffic though.
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:57 PM   #47
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e currently live in the PNW where rough water probably doesn't really enter into the equation unless one is crossing larger stretches of water.
This is a very inaccurate assumption. Even the smaller bodies of water here can develop closely spaced, steep, wind waves that can be very dangerous, particularly to boaters inexperienced in these conditions.

Certainly the big bodies of water-- San Juan Strait, the Strait of Georgia, Queen Charlotte Strait, Johnstone Strait, can get downright deadly to small boats when the wind kicks up.

But the smaller bays like Bellingham Bay can whip up into big, breaking,, closely-spaced waves on windy days. There have been boats-- not a lot fortunately-- that have Ben caught out in the following waves, broached, rolled over, and sunk in Bellingham Bay. The most recent I'm aware of was a 30-something foot commercial fishing boat that was lost with all hands. This inside a bay that most evenings looks like a dead flat lake.

And if the wind opposes the current, watch out because that's when it can really get serious. Given our high tidal range and resulting strong currents, wind forecasts become very important.

Given the waters that we boat in, which include Bellingham Bay, Rosario Strait, and the south end of the Strait of Georgia, we have set limits on the strength of the wind we will go out in. If the wind is from the SE-S-SW our limit is 20 knots. If the wind is from the N-NW our limit is 25 knots although a wind this strong must be going the same direction as the current. And we really need to want to go out to do so at the upper ends of our limits.

Obviously the forecasts and currents play a major role in our route and go-no go decisions when wind is or is likely to be a factor. The relative directions of the wind and current have a major effect on the conditions we will encounter. Local knowledge, which in this case we have been accumulating for the last 14 years (we've only just scratched the surface in this regard) is also an important factor in our decisions. If the wind is this and the current is that we have learned that in such and such a channel or bay, water conditions will be X.

To think that just because our inside waters are isolated from the ocean and the Pacific coast they will be relatively mild, think again.
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Old 03-18-2013, 05:38 PM   #48
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Yep, I came in Depoe Bay once on a fishing....
The same thing happened to me in 1971, salmon fishing, sick as a dog, didn't care if we hit the rocks or not, I just wanted to get off that boat. Depoe Bay, Oregon.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:16 PM   #49
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This is a very inaccurate assumption. Even the smaller bodies of water here can develop closely spaced, steep, wind waves that can be very dangerous, particularly to boaters inexperienced in these conditions.

Certainly the big bodies of water-- San Juan Strait, the Strait of Georgia, Queen Charlotte Strait, Johnstone Strait, can get downright deadly to small boats when the wind kicks up.

But the smaller bays like Bellingham Bay can whip up into big, breaking,, closely-spaced waves on windy days. There have been boats-- not a lot fortunately-- that have Ben caught out in the following waves, broached, rolled over, and sunk in Bellingham Bay. The most recent I'm aware of was a 30-something foot commercial fishing boat that was lost with all hands. This inside a bay that most evenings looks like a dead flat lake.

And if the wind opposes the current, watch out because that's when it can really get serious. Given our high tidal range and resulting strong currents, wind forecasts become very important.

Given the waters that we boat in, which include Bellingham Bay, Rosario Strait, and the south end of the Strait of Georgia, we have set limits on the strength of the wind we will go out in. If the wind is from the SE-S-SW our limit is 20 knots. If the wind is from the N-NW our limit is 25 knots although a wind this strong must be going the same direction as the current. And we really need to want to go out to do so at the upper ends of our limits.

Obviously the forecasts and currents play a major role in our route and go-no go decisions when wind is or is likely to be a factor. The relative directions of the wind and current have a major effect on the conditions we will encounter. Local knowledge, which in this case we have been accumulating for the last 14 years (we've only just scratched the surface in this regard) is also an important factor in our decisions. If the wind is this and the current is that we have learned that in such and such a channel or bay, water conditions will be X.

To think that just because our inside waters are isolated from the ocean and the Pacific coast they will be relatively mild, think again.
Thanks Marin for that. I stand corrected. I have a lot to learn but this thread has started me thinking and visualizing. This is invaluable.

To everyone else that posted, thank you. Please keep it coming. I'm taking notes.
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:17 PM   #50
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Thanks Marin for that. I stand corrected. I have a lot to learn but this thread has started me thinking and visualizing.
Don't forget that even the experts-- of which I am not one--- had a first day on the water. Everyone starts at the bottom of the learning curve. In my opinion the best way to learn boating is to start boating. The Internet can be a valuable source of information but it can also so overload you with data and advice that a person can be intimidated into not doing anything because of a fear of not knowing enough to start.

So I say ignore all of it. Or at least treat it all as light reading for entertainment purposes but don't think it's all stuff you have to know before you dip a toe into the boating waters.

All the boaters (and pilots) I know and have tremendous respect for got into boating (and flying) long before Al Gore invented the Internet. They (and I) simply got a boat that made sense or appealed to them and started boating. You learn as you go. And if you find the boating thing is something you want to develop more, you maybe move up to a bigger or more capable boat and you keep boating and learning.

This is why when people have stopped at our boat in the marina and wanted to talk about our boat and how to get into this kind of boating I immediately send them off to the GB charter outfit at the head of the dock. I believe boating is something best learned-- particularly in the beginning-- by doing it, not by talking to people about it.

USCG Auxiliary boating classes are a great resource and there are books covering every aspect of boating one might be interested in. But in my opinion the more time a person spends messing about in a boat, be it a battered, 6hp, 12-foot Sears aluminum skiff that was the first boat I ever owned, or a GB like we have now, or the more capable boat that may lie in our future, and the less time they spend asking for Internet advise and even worse, reading it ()the better a boater thy will become.

That's my opinion and I'm sticking to it.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:15 PM   #51
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....well said Marin.
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