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Old 10-13-2019, 12:34 AM   #1
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Pacific Crossing - West to East

Hi Everyone

I was wondering if anyone has done this route in reverse?



I'm interested in the possibility of doing it in a Nordhavn 43 (or 41).

Also, is there a single resource for planning a trip like this for people who've never done it? I read and watch as much as possible but everything in one spot would be a big time saver!
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Old 10-13-2019, 01:32 AM   #2
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The folks who are most likely to have done it are sailboaters, ask this question in that forum (link below).

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Old 10-13-2019, 04:01 AM   #3
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The folks who are most likely to have done it are sailboaters, ask this question in that forum (link below).

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Thanks. I've seen a few YouTubers with catamarans relate their experience. I was hoping to hear about any trawler specific comments/resources etc.
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Old 10-13-2019, 07:49 AM   #4
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Have a look at the Pacific Puddle Jump, for east to west. However they have some great information and stories. Also, you may be able to at least time it so you can keep in touch with various boats on that journey even if you are going in the opposite direction - when it hits the fan in the middle of the pacific, the direction someone is going is less important that how far away help is!

Because of the prevailing currents (look at the pilots charts or just the sea currents), you'll probably find very very few who try and go west to east south of the equator unless they are way way south. Most of the good currents west to east are north of the equator, changing the jumping off point quite a lot as there's a lot of ocean and almost no land in both north and south Pacific, but just above the equator there's precious little once you've left the Phillipines!

I hope you didn't drink in the Nordhaven's line on 8000nm range on the new 41 - I thought it had been quite debunked...
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:16 AM   #5
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I hope you didn't drink in the Nordhaven's line on 8000nm range on the new 41 - I thought it had been quite debunked...
I believe the Nordhavn (Leishman) as much as admitted that those figures provided by the engine manufacturer (IIRC) were highly unlikely to be realized in a real world situation. What the OP is proposing is also a puddle jump, with the longest leg being about 3000 nm, which may be doable. The Nordhavn website will have accounts of the circumnavigation they did with one of their smaller boats and I believe a number of 46's have done this. At the very least he will be able to get some real world data on diesel usage per the engines in the boats that have done it, and whether on board tankage was sufficient or if extra fuel in bladders was ever required.
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Old 10-13-2019, 05:07 PM   #6
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Thanks for the info and the PPJ resource.

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I hope you didn't drink in the Nordhaven's line on 8000nm range on the new 41 - I thought it had been quite debunked...
No I didn't drink that 'kool aid'! But wouldn't it be nice...
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Old 10-13-2019, 05:16 PM   #7
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... What the OP is proposing is also a puddle jump, with the longest leg being about 3000 nm, which may be doable. The Nordhavn website will have accounts of the circumnavigation they did with one of their smaller boats and I believe a number of 46's have done this. At the very least he will be able to get some real world data on diesel usage per the engines in the boats that have done it, and whether on board tankage was sufficient or if extra fuel in bladders was ever required.
The shorter hops look doable. I'm not sure how the currents will affect overall speed (still looking into this). I did find bladder tank mfrs ATL Inc http://atlinc.com/rangeextender.html which look like they could do the job.

I'm trying to get big picture possibilities at the moment, as I am as my profile name suggests, a total newb!

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Old 10-13-2019, 05:41 PM   #8
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Having done that east to west, I would never in a million years buck that all the way across. Sailboaters trying to make it home from New Zealand typically hang at latitude 35 south till SSW of French Poly, then North to Tahiti, the line Islands and Hawaii before heading NE to San Francisco. You WILL be into the wind. You WILL be hit by a storm on latitude 35S. From Hawaii you are typically home free.
Get Jimmy Cornell's book World Cruising Routes to find routes and distances and times of the year to do this.
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:13 PM   #9
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Hi Everyone

I was wondering if anyone has done this route in reverse?

I'm interested in the possibility of doing it in a Nordhavn 43 (or 41).

Also, is there a single resource for planning a trip like this for people who've never done it? I read and watch as much as possible but everything in one spot would be a big time saver!
Haven't done it and definitely wouldn't try in a Nordhavn 43 or 41. Nordhavn even hugged the coast when delivering their 120 and were glad they did so.
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:44 PM   #10
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Haven't done it and definitely wouldn't try in a Nordhavn 43 or 41. Nordhavn even hugged the coast when delivering their 120 and were glad they did so.
Really? Why do you say that? Is it the eastbound part you don't like the sound of or ocean crossing in them in general? Interested to hear all opinions. Thanks
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:50 PM   #11
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Really? Why do you say that? Is it the eastbound part you don't like the sound of or ocean crossing in them in general? Interested to hear all opinions. Thanks
It's the distance and possible conditions. There are Nordhavns capable of ocean crossings but the 41 and 43 are limited in that respect. I've known people to cross the Pacific in 150-200' yachts but they don't attempt it all in one run as they couldn't based on fuel and they either do it around the outside, the rim, or they island hop. I'd suggest you read the story of the delivery of the Nordhavn 120 and see their route and the conditions they faced taking the safe route.
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:53 PM   #12
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On a theoretical basis, I've been thinking of a similar route: San Fran > Hilo, Hawaii > Kiribati, then explore S. Pacific islands to westward & turn around, track same route west to east on a Diesel Duck steel-hulled 382, sail-rigged. I understand a good route from Hawaii to San Fran. proceeds north, then eastward, then south, to use good winds. I say this in case my 382's single engine quits. I believe Krogen 42s have done this, as well. Fuel capacity is key.
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:05 PM   #13
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Iím kind of wondering why someone with little boating experience would be considering such a trip?

When I was active in the running community, it reminds me of folks that donít run, never have run a race, yet decide what they want to do is train for and race a Marathon. What if you donít like it?
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:10 PM   #14
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Iím kind of wondering why someone with little boating experience would be considering such a trip? When I was active in the running community, it reminds me of folks that donít run, never have run a race, yet decide what they want to do is train for and race a Marathon. What if you donít like it?
You're not answering the OP's question.
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:23 PM   #15
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... or they island hop. I'd suggest you read the story of the delivery of the Nordhavn 120 and see their route and the conditions they faced taking the safe route.
Thanks. I would island hop as you suggest. Similar to the legs in blue in the image. Possibly change up to via Hawai'i.
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:29 PM   #16
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Iím kind of wondering why someone with little boating experience would be considering such a trip?

When I was active in the running community, it reminds me of folks that donít run, never have run a race, yet decide what they want to do is train for and race a Marathon. What if you donít like it?
I guess it's a bit like when I learned to fly helicopters, I wanted to know what could be done, what I could do in them and their potential. I've been on small boats and love it and I've done hundreds of ship landings offshore and loved that too! What can I say, I like the environment
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:32 PM   #17
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I guess it's a bit like when I learned to fly helicopters, I wanted to know what could be done, what I could do in them and their potential. I've been on small boats and love it and I've done hundreds of ship landings offshore and loved that too! What can I say, I like the environment

Well, I can certainly understand that.

If you are interested in ocean crossings, have you considered a cruising sailboat? It seems that most transoceanic crossings are done with sailboats.
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:43 PM   #18
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Well, I can certainly understand that.

If you are interested in ocean crossings, have you considered a cruising sailboat? It seems that most transoceanic crossings are done with sailboats.
Hi Dave

Yes, originally I had thought of and looked into Catamarans but I'm drawn more towards power boats for my needs.

Thanks
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:59 PM   #19
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On a theoretical basis, I've been thinking of a similar route: San Fran > Hilo, Hawaii > Kiribati, then explore S. Pacific islands to westward & turn around, track same route west to east on a Diesel Duck steel-hulled 382, sail-rigged. I understand a good route from Hawaii to San Fran. proceeds north, then eastward, then south, to use good winds. I say this in case my 382's single engine quits. I believe Krogen 42s have done this, as well. Fuel capacity is key.
Thanks. I don't think range is the issue from what I can tell, albeit assisted by bladder tanks. I guess there must be some cruising to Hawaii that need to get back. One person posted that "once you get to Hawaii you're home free". Would be nice to hear from those that have done it.
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Old 10-14-2019, 12:23 AM   #20
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Do some research on the Nordhavn site and look at the owners stories, I look at one a few years ago of a couple that headed to the West coast of S. America, then to The Galapagos, to Tahiti, up to Hawaii then North over the High to Alaska. If I recall they did it on a N57 ( one of the best in IMHO ). Also there is info out there of a Seattle boat that did the north side of the equator all the way across the pac. to Japan, I think it was a Northern Marine 60.
its doable but its out on the edge.. and that's coming from someone that HAS crossed the pacific in a 35' boat!
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