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Old 06-11-2014, 11:45 AM   #21
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When visiting another country, you never mess around with documenting any of the things that they care about (no matter what or why). Guns, pets, liquor, cigarettes, radio licenses, whatever. I was once arrested in Canada because I checked in 1,000 sets of sunglasses we were giving away at a conference/training and didn't re-document that they were actually given away 4 days later. I never would have imagined that they cared...until 4 armed agents showed up at a presentation I was giving and hauled me off. That's learning the hard way...
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Old 06-11-2014, 01:35 PM   #22
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Interesting, you wonder if the first customs agent noticed you gaving an off handed bullet count and tipped off BDF?
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Old 06-11-2014, 01:52 PM   #23
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When visiting another country, you never mess around with documenting any of the things that they care about (no matter what or why). Guns, pets, liquor, cigarettes, radio licenses, whatever. I was once arrested in Canada because I checked in 1,000 sets of sunglasses we were giving away at a conference/training and didn't re-document that they were actually given away 4 days later. I never would have imagined that they cared...until 4 armed agents showed up at a presentation I was giving and hauled me off. That's learning the hard way...
Now that's funny

Almost as funny as the time i was moving back to Fairbanks, AK and the Canadians on the border were convinced I had hidden guns in the truck (30' van) full of household goods I was driving.

After an hour of me unpacking the van, they gave up as the stuff near the roof of the van started to avalanche on to their heads.

The whole Canadian thing is bizarre. I have probably crossed over 30 borders with customs, etc and the worst is always Canada, both entering and then returning to the US, with US Border Protection is even worse then ever.

I just don't get it. DO these idiots (US and Canadian) not know that there are thousands of unwatched places any one with terror on their mind can cross?

It's all "Security Charade"
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Old 06-11-2014, 04:53 PM   #24
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I've cruised the Bahamas on 4 separate occasions for 2-3 months at a time, never with a gun and never felt the need for one(and yes, I have several at home). They are nice enough to make it easy to bring a firearm in, but I've read several times that they are very particular about precisely declaring ammunition, which this story confirms. So clearly, if you feel the need to carry a firearm into a foreign country, you need to be VERY careful about complying with the letter of their law. For example, if you get caught bringing a gun into Mexico the consequences can be much worse than Wman2blame faced!

Perhaps I've been lucky, but I've had nothing but good experiences visiting the Bahamas, and I'll be back, hopefully soon!
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Old 06-11-2014, 05:34 PM   #25
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I have had the good fortune to spend a good amount of time visiting other countries. Among things that stand out is the number of times I have witnessed tourists offending natives because the tourist was ignorant of local customs or purposely ignored them. The flip side of this is that the native's reaction may be harsh because he or she has been offended.

American's are fortunate in a small sense in that Hollywood has broadcast the American culture to the rest of the world. Every now and then when an American insults a non-American in another country the non-American, having watched television, realizes the insult was not intended.
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Old 06-11-2014, 05:55 PM   #26
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American's are fortunate in a small sense in that Hollywood has broadcast the American culture to the rest of the world. Every now and then when an American insults a non-American in another country the non-American, having watched television, realizes the insult was not intended.
And here I was hoping the people I meet in other countries were NOT judging me by what they may have seen in American movies and TV.
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Old 06-12-2014, 12:37 AM   #27
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Old 06-12-2014, 03:06 AM   #28
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Now that's funny

The whole Canadian thing is bizarre. I have probably crossed over 30 borders with customs, etc and the worst is always Canada, both entering and then returning to the US, with US Border Protection is even worse then ever.

I just don't get it. DO these idiots (US and Canadian) "
Different strokes I guess. For five decades my quite frequent Canada crossings have been trouble free. If you are entered into the system as a problem though, expect big time hassles. Also be aware a guest on your vessel can trigger issues too if their passport is flagged, with long term repercussions then entered under vessel name and coming back to haunt your vessel's entries forever.
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Old 06-13-2014, 06:46 AM   #29
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Apparently the boat theft problem is becoming worse in the Bahamas.We just returned from the Exumas and stayed at Palm Cay Marina on New Providence Island (Nassau). They put up a sea gate at night to prevent such an occurrence.
A very accommodating marina I might add and getting better by the day.
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Old 06-13-2014, 07:57 AM   #30
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My crossings into Canada from the United States have been extremely easy and pleasant - with one very humorous entry into Canada on the day they combined customs, immigration and agriculture inspections into one team. No one on the team that boarded Bay Pelican had been with agriculture and they couldn't figure out what to do with an onion we had brought from the United States. They had seized the onion and put it in an evidence bag. After a number of phone calls the offending onion was returned to us. Both "agents" and the police they called for the evidence bag were at all times friendly and frankly nice guys about the whole thing.
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Old 06-13-2014, 09:18 AM   #31
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I am fortunate to live part time in the Bahamas and to travel extensively all over the world. The rudest and most arrogant officials are to be found in the good ole USA.
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Old 06-13-2014, 10:34 AM   #32
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I am fortunate to live part time in the Bahamas and to travel extensively all over the world. The rudest and most arrogant officials are to be found in the good ole USA.
That's a high position to hold....

I've been held at gun point while performing a HUMEVAC in one and almost handcuffed while traveling on military orders in another with "that country's" explicit capital permission.....never in the US...

Maybe it's who you are and what you are doing that sets the tone...I've seen great attitude ad compassion where ever I go...also arrogance and rudeness (but rudeness is often just a cultural thing that in a "global" world...some have to get a grip.

We're good at what we do...even if it's being rude...but hold the title???

I guess it depends who the judges are...
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Old 06-13-2014, 11:08 AM   #33
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Being a US citizen my knowledge of the US treatment of non-citizens is all anecdotal. Over two-thirds of the Caribbean cruisers are not US citizens and I don't hear rudeness complaints.

My opinion is that the US visa requirements for citizens of visa waver countries arriving by boat are silly and not required but this is neither rude nor arrogant.
Background, the US does not require a visa for citizens of a number of countries if that citizen flies to the US, but if the same person arrives by his boat he is required to first go to a US embassy (consulate) and get a visa.
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Old 06-13-2014, 05:36 PM   #34
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Just another factor in preparing to go to Bahamas

When I prepared to go to Bahamas ,I used the bible of cruising guides to Bahamas, it told me how many bottles of wine , beer, cigarettes,everything , It told me I could take weapons ,but it did not say what ever you do make sure you count each and every bullet. You would think that would be the most important priority. There is not one bit of information that says you can only have 250 rounds of ammo. , even when they were working me over did anyone of them know how many rounds were the law. All I can say is my trawler is the only home I have,I had a Jim bag with my pistol and ammo in it , that I used to go target practice with my retired buddies on Friday every once in awhile.
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Old 06-13-2014, 05:54 PM   #35
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There is a fear of retribution

When you are in the Bahamas , You do not dare go around and tell anyone the customs official just ripped you off for $100.00 because you didn't think a receipt was important. You don't go around and say anything when you have been charged $2,500 cash for to many bullets. When I was in Nassau harbor there were boats that were boarded and confiscated pending litigation , imagine to cost there. If you have 1 joint it's automatic. I am only posting this first hand information so others will know, it's all fun and games until it's not.
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Old 06-13-2014, 06:05 PM   #36
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This is the funny part of the whole event

While I was being interagated for too many bullets , I was driven around in private vehicles in Naussau I had my Jim bag with bullets in the back seat with me while my escorts and arresting custom officials were sitting up front with no one in the back with me and this went on for 3 hours until someone finally said maybe we should take his Jim bag.
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Old 06-13-2014, 11:21 PM   #37
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No outboard here, thank goodness.



(As if I'd ever take the boat out of the USA.)
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Old 06-14-2014, 12:08 AM   #38
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When I prepared to go to Bahamas ,I used the bible of cruising guides to Bahamas, it told me how many bottles of wine , beer, cigarettes,everything , It told me I could take weapons ,but it did not say what ever you do make sure you count each and every bullet. You would think that would be the most important priority. There is not one bit of information that says you can only have 250 rounds of ammo. , even when they were working me over did anyone of them know how many rounds were the law. All I can say is my trawler is the only home I have,I had a Jim bag with my pistol and ammo in it , that I used to go target practice with my retired buddies on Friday every once in awhile.
Why in Gods name would you want even 250 rounds, let alone any more!? Of course with 250 rounds and enough cases of Kalik Gold you could take over Cat Island or perhaps Rum Cay I guess.

So when you got to the part of the form that ask "Calibre & Qty. Ammunition" for the gun you are declaring you just thought they wanted you to guess at a number?

Instead of a cruising guide, next time try Google.

Boating Entering/Exiting Policies | The Official Site of The Bahamas

"If you have a firearm on board (shotguns and handguns only) you must declare it with Bahamian Customs. You must provide the serial number, name of the manufacturer, plus an exact count of ammunition. While you are allowed to have a firearm on your boat, you cannot remove it. Weapons must be under lock and key at all times. In cases of emergencies, which require your departure by air, you must notify Bahamian Police or Customs. They will accompany you to retrieve the firearm and present you with a receipt. Upon your return to the island, Bahamian Police or Customs will escort you to your vessel and return your firearm. Any infraction of this law will be dealt with severely."
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:09 AM   #39
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I think you're quite fortunate for the rather modest fine. I'll say this to any gun owner, you better know the laws of every jurisdiction you travel in. If you don't believe the seriousness of that, ask those who have been incarcerated for three years in NYC, ask Plaxico Burress about the penalty for not having a hand gun registered in NY.

This wasn't just some minor miscount. That's why I asked the question of how many put on the document vs. actual. This wasn't saying 12 bullets and there were 13. This was over 250 rounds and I'm guessing not just one or two rounds over. Carrying 250 rounds seems outrageous to me, but then just guessing at the number. So, I see the Bahamas officials as very lenient. I could see that getting you some jail time in many jurisdictions. In the future I'd just advise you to know the gun laws wherever you go and comply 100%. Next time you might not be so lucky as just to incur a $2500 fine.
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:49 AM   #40
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250 rounds is not outrageous to a gun owner that lives in a place where guns are as common as dogs not on a lease.

But I think the issue here is that the Bahamas has had a recent crime spree involving guns. Like many law enforcement jurisdictions...they may know the trick of not only following the money...follow the ammunition...it can tell a story of it's own.
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