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Old 10-05-2015, 11:24 AM   #81
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In all my rush to catch up I overlooked a port we stayed in after Weymouth, Torquay. From Weymouth to Torquay the coastline is called the Jurassic coast because of the rock formations along it and Torquay is referred to as, The English Riviera.
Apologies for that oversight but we've been plagued with bad weather and indifferent Internet connections and I screwed up, oops !


In WW2 Torquay figured heavily in the D-Day landings and special concrete ramps were built so that the landing craft could, after the initial assault, ferry more men and all the necessary supplies to support them, then they started a 24/7 shuttle service from Torquay to Omaha, Juno and Gold beaches.
They simply dropped the doors and ran the landing craft up the ramp where it would be loaded while the crew grabbed food and drink which they would consume on the run over as time was precious.
As all the ports were heavily defended they had to make their own, after the initial assault phase, concrete structures called 'Mulberry harbours' were towed over the channel and sunk in precise locations close to the coast, these Mulberry's were then connected to each other by metal linkspan roadways and ships could then dock in the artificial harbour to unload and fleets of truck ferried the goods ashore for distribution.
Close to Torquay is Brixham harbour, home to a large fishing fleet and the most incontinent seagulls I've ever encountered, the reason I didn't moor there was because of the constant deluge from these flying rats. Boy does it stick like the proverbial s..t to a blanket. Moored in Brixham harbour is an exact replica of Sir Francis Drakes ship the 'Golden Hind'.
The 'pirates tell tales to the kids(and Mums too). the guy in the red costume is showing the 'Cat O nine tails', seamen who broke the law were given lashes across the back then sluiced off with salt water.
While moored in Torquay we had magnificent fireworks displays.
Incidentally, all the boats, some 25 or so, that had taken part in a race around Fastnet rock who spurned us as 'stinkpot cruisers' ALL used their engines returning to their respective home ports, the sailing boat shown was going the other way ! Some freakin sailors eh !
When we saluted them NOT ONE returned our wave, such bad manners.
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:31 AM   #82
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Thanks for the posts IR. I enjoy the photos
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:41 AM   #83
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Here are more photo's of Brixham and Torquay.
The cruise ship anchored in Torquay bays previous port of call had been Amsterdam.
The dreaded lobster pots look harmless enough here but skippers need to keep a keen eye out for them when cruising.
The Red Arrows display lasted 20 minutes and was absolutely world class and massive crowds gathered to watch them.
Brixham trawler with marina in the back ground.
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Old 10-05-2015, 12:22 PM   #84
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Great tour you're giving us. Thanks!
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Old 10-05-2015, 04:50 PM   #85
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Thanks for the photos IR. Had Lunch at the Ship Inn last Christmas. There was mint Jaguar 150S parked right outside. Loved Lymington and the Isle of Wight.
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Old 10-06-2015, 08:33 AM   #86
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You know exactly where we were moored Grae, I was looking at the car and having a crafty wee peek the blonde inside it !


Putting Lymington and Southampton behind us we left Southampton water single handed (the girls had gone to the South of France on family business and we'd rendezvous with them in Portsmouth later) by the Eastern channel on our way to Portsmouth, passing Lee on Solent on our Portside where there's a hovercraft museum.
The hovercraft was invented by Sir Christopher Cockerell and the experimental work was done on the Isle of Wight, there are many hovercraft in use by military forces in both the US and the Russians but the one's we see today are commuter craft and used for a more peaceful purpose. photo.
As we enter the approaches there are round forts built on sandbanks to defend the ports with cannon, later in WW2 they were used as anti aircraft emplacements.
Entering the Portsmouth one must be very vigilant and follow the port control directions as this is the second busiest port in the UK with up to 80,000 vessel movements per annum.
The spinnaker tower looks out over the entrance while the old forts on each side of the entrance still command the entrance.
Spice Island is just behind the starboard fort where sailing ships unloaded spices from the Orient.
Entering Portsmouth there are actually two ports, Portsmouth on the right with it's massive naval base and Gosport on the left where the majority of the marina's are, we're headed for the Royal Clarence marina in Gosport.
There is so much to show you from around here I will break it down into several posts for you.
The old sailing ship out at sea is the T/S Lord Nelson.
The one preserved in port is HMS Warrior, Britain's first Ironclad steam and sail ship and is now a museum and laid out inside as if the crew had just got up and walked out, food on the tables, glasses with drink still in them and clothes laid out as it would have been seen in service.
Enjoy.
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Old 10-06-2015, 08:46 AM   #87
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You know exactly where we were moored Grae, I was looking at the car and a wee peek the blonde !


Putting both Lymington and Southampton behind us we left Southampton water by the Eastern channel on our way to Portsmouth passing Lee on Solent on our Portside where there is a hovercraft museum.
The hovercraft was invented by Sir Christopher Cockerell and the experimental work was done on the Isle of Wight, there are many hovercraft in use by military forces in both the US and the Russians but the ones we see today are commuter craft and used for a more peaceful purpose. photo.
As we enter the approaches there are round forts that were built on sandbanks to defend the ports with cannon, later in WW2 they were used as anti aircraft emplacements.
Entering the Portsmouth one must be very vigilant and follow the port control directions as this is the second busiest port in the UK with up to 80,000 vessel movements a day.
The spinnaker towers over the entrance while the old forts on each side of the entrance still command the entrance.
As we enter Portsmouth there are actually two ports, Portsmouth on the right with it's massive naval base and Gosport on the left where the majority of the marina's are, we were headed for the Royal Clarence marina in Gosport.
There is so much to show you here I will break it down into several posts for you.
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Old 10-11-2015, 03:56 AM   #88
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I posted the last one twice, I thought it hadn't uploaded so I repeated it, oops !
When we arrived in Gosport we discovered lots of treasures, in the 1700's this was the Navy's worldwide logistics centre and there was a cooperage and stores for every imaginable thing a sailing ship would need including their own farm and slaughterhouse, once the colony's were gradually established Gosport lost some of it's importance as supplies were obtained locally to support the emerging colony's.
There are several museums depicting naval history, one is called Explosion and we had a great day out there as you will see from the photo's. I hope you enjoy them.
The first is the old 'Redbeard' nuclear bomb and alongside it the much smaller more modern version which has 20 times the capacity of the Hiroshima bomb, newer smart bombs are even smaller.
The mines are contact, acoustic and magnetic.
The business end of the barrel, and assortment of ammo for different applications.
Various types of torpedo.
Ronald Reagan let it slip about 'Star shield', well here's the proof that he wasn't joking.
The little rocket on the yellow trolley is an Exocet missile, nicknamed 'The Mother In Law' you couldn't prevent it arriving, when it did all hell broke loose.
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Old 10-11-2015, 10:54 PM   #89
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Our next visit was to the Royal Navy museum in Portsmouth so we took a ferry over and had a wonderful day out, again you need a full day at least to view everything on offer. The entrance ticket also includes a harbour cruise with commentary.
First we looked at how the ships were built and maintained.
A ship of the line took 6,000 trees to build and 7 for 1 mast alone. A typical English scene is with Oak trees growing in the meadow and cows shading from the sun, gentry were encouraged to grow these oaks for the governments ship building programme.
The navy's constant demand for pulley blocks for sailing ships employed 100 men until Mr Marc Brunel invented machines and a production line that only needed 10 men and doubled the speed of production.
His son, Isambard Kingdom Brunel went on to design and build the great Western railway and the Great Eastern which was the first iron built, steam powered, propeller driven commercial ship.
Lord Nelson's flagship of course is the star of the show and I will post pictures here for you with a post later covering the battle of Trafalgar, his finest hour but one which cost him his life.
The fist photo is a WW2 Motor Torpedo Boat, they had Packard petrol engines and a small V8 for loitering or landing agents ashore in the nights.
An air sea rescue launch for collecting any fighter/bomber crews that had to parachute into the sea.
One of the gun decks (there were three) each of these guns could fire 3 rounds a minute.
Nelson's uniform.
Cat O' nine tails for unruly crew.
The spot where Lord Nelson fell.
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Old 10-11-2015, 11:47 PM   #90
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The Battle of Trafalgar.
A Franco Spanish fleet of 39 ships sailed from Cadiz on Napoleons orders commanded by Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve in the French ship Redoubtable.
Waiting for them was a British fleet of 27 ships commanded by Lord Horatio Nelson.
The winds were light and the British fleet had time to sit down to a breakfast of pork and a half pint of wine before commencing battle.
Nelson said to Mr Pascoe his flag officer 'I wish to say to the fleet that England confides that every man do his duty but be quick because I have another signal to send which is for close action'.
Mr Pascoe pointed out the 'expects' is in the flag vocabulary as a single flag, but 'confides' needs a flag for every letter' 'That will do Mr Pascoe, make it quick' that has now gone down into the annals of history as 'England expects every man to do his duty'.
Nelson never used the same strategy in any battle, tradition dictated that the two opposing fleets would sail on parallel lines and blast away at each other until one or the other was so damaged the engagement was broken off.
Nelson knew the weakest point of the ships was the great cabin at the stern where they weren't so heavily built, had a lot of windows and housed the crucial steering gear. Any sniper will tell you that if you take out the commanders confusion will reign, more so in this case because of language difficulties between the French and their Spanish allies.
Nelson's tactic was initially to sail alongside as tradition demanded, then turn his ships through 90% and sail between each of the enemy raking their stern cabins with cannon as they passed.
Nelsons Victory then engaged the French Redoubtable and locked rigging, a shot from a mizzen mast from one of the strong infantry contingent on board felled Nelson.
British ships could fire 3 rounds a minute as opposed to 1 round a minute from the enemy and British ships fired 1 and a half tons of shot on each salvo, 4 and a half tons a minute.
On the other side HMS Temeraire rammed the Redoubtable and lashed herself to it and continually raked it with point blank broadsides to stop the French boarding Victory and the French fighting complement was reduced from 600 to 150 in short order.
Even though the British fleet was out gunned and out manned the casualties were 14,500 French and 1,500 British.
Nelson's body was placed in a barrel filled with brandy to preserve it and taken back to London for a state burial, it's been suggested that officers of the fleet were given a tot of the brandy in which Nelsons body had been preserved and that it was used to raise a toast to Lord Horatio Nelson's life, the tot was referred to 'Nelson's blood'.
In London, Nelsons column stands high and proud, each of the lampposts in the square has a ship of the line on the top, even in death Lord Horatio Nelson still looks over his fleet.
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Old 10-12-2015, 07:42 PM   #91
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That's the history lessons over, our girls have arrived back from France by ferry from Le Havre and it was time to consult the tea leaves, cards or even wet our thumb and stick it in the air to see what the weather held in store for us so we could be on our way, time was getting short for us to reach our winter moorings in Dunkirk due to the capricious weather.
Actually we use the UK government weather site to check surface pressure predictions and the best free site we've found so far from the many claiming to be the best is meteofrance.com.
The predictions are the worst case scenario and it's never let us down so far.
We planned to leave Gosport and cruise to Eastbourne to catch a favourable tide to speed our progress with our secondary ports of Shoreham with it's tempting Spanish bar with Tapas snacks, San Miguel and Estrella Damm beer on draught alongside the small marina there, it's a small commercial port accessed by a sea lock but we wanted to avoid restrictions so ruled it out.
Brighton marina is a super marina, a wee bit out of town but has great facilities, Brighton's regarded as the gay capital of the South of England and as an old fashioned WASP that ruled it out for me.
Eastbourne was within a hard days cruising so we opted for that despite having a sea lock.
Eastbourne is known as 'the retirement capital of the South' with it's soft climate and genteel atmosphere with house prices far less than Brighton making it suitable for pensioners.
The marina is part of an out of town development on reclaimed land with the usual tower blocks of flats, for us it had no atmosphere at all, a couple of yuppie upmarket restaurants but a surprisingly good 'chippie' (fish & chip shop) hidden away around the back. Since I was last there some fishing boats have began to work out of there which helps but I'm sure the well heeled locals will soon be complaining of the noise and smell.
As we had good weather the following day we were only staying only one night anyway.
Photo of chalky cliffs so typical of this coastline.
In Victorian times there was a passion for building piers out into the sea for people to stroll along as it was thought the ozone sea air beneficial.
If you came from an industrial area you can understand why it was so popular, many had amusements lining the sides and other had small theatre's. Blackpool pier in Lancashire North West England is probably the best known in the UK.
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Old 10-22-2015, 02:10 AM   #92
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Our last English port on our journey to the Mediterranean is Dover, Dover is the busiest seaport in Great Britain with a ship movement at least every 15 minutes.
As the closest port to France these are obviously ferry movements but cruise ships regularly call and for a private cruiser passing it's a handy stopover with London only 40 minutes away by train.
Surprisingly the charges for cruisers are reasonable (except for lift outs) and the staff very helpful and friendly.
The port of course is commercial but if you approach from the west and make for Granville dock which has lock gates to hold the water level and is very secure.
Everyone has heard of the White Cliffs of Dover but they hold a fascinating secret, they are riddled with tunnels. These tunnels formed a labyrinth of command bunkers, lookout posts, electronic eavesdropping and gun posts dating back to WW2, as the closest port to France and bearing in mind that the 2 countries were at war for a 100 years you can understand why.
It's castle is considered one of the best preserved in Britain.
On the esplanade just beside Granville dock is a cracker of a ships chandlers dating back to 1860 called Sharp & Enright, it's staff are very knowledgeable and you can almost smell the hemp and tar from a bygone age, nowadays they have every screw, bolt, geegaw, doodad and thingy you could ever want for a ship.
I came out more knowledgeable and lighter in the wallet.
As the last chance to visit an English pub we of course visited several as any sailor visiting a port would do and found ourselves in a pub run by a company called Weatherspoon's, this company have a chain of pubs in Britain and Ireland with the simple format of supplying a wide range of the usual beers at keen price but also 'pub grub', gourmet eating it is not but for an economy meal including a free drink it ideal for sailors on a budget.
Yep ! you guessed it, we were again caught for a week of bad weather but it's not the worst place to be stuck if you go rooting around the outskirts it's surprisingly large with all the support services of a big seaport.
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Old 10-22-2015, 02:18 AM   #93
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On our way from Eastbourne to Dover we passed this austere looking nuclear power station, it may be austere but it sure beats the hell out of the ugly, inefficient windfarms that are sprouting up all over the place destroying the scenery.
Our last English port on our journey to the Mediterranean is Dover, Dover is the busiest seaport in Great Britain with a ship movement at least every 15 minutes.
As the closest port to France these are obviously ferry movements but cruise ships regularly call and for a private cruiser passing it's a handy stopover with London only 40 minutes away by train.
Surprisingly the charges for cruisers are reasonable (except for lift outs) and the staff very helpful and friendly.
The port of course is commercial but if you approach from the west and make for Granville dock which has lock gates to hold the water level and is very secure.
Everyone has heard of the White Cliffs of Dover but they hold a fascinating secret, they are riddled with tunnels. These tunnels formed a labyrinth of command bunkers, lookout posts, electronic eavesdropping and gun posts dating back to WW2, as the closest port to France and bearing in mind that the 2 countries were at war for a 100 years you can understand why.
It's castle is considered one of the best preserved in Britain.
On the esplanade just beside Granville dock is a cracker of a ships chandlers dating back to 1860 called Sharp & Enright, it's staff are very knowledgeable and you can almost smell the hemp and tar from a bygone age, nowadays they have every screw, bolt, geegaw, doodad and thingy you could ever want for a ship.
I came out more knowledgeable and a good bit lighter in the wallet.
As the last chance to visit an English pub we of course visited several as any sailor visiting a port would do and found ourselves in a pub run by a company called Weatherspoon's, this company have a chain of pubs in Britain and Ireland with the simple format of supplying a wide range of the usual beers at keen price but also 'pub grub', gourmet eating it is not, but for an economy meal including a free drink it's ideal for sailors on a budget.
Yep ! you guessed it, we were again caught for a week of bad weather but it's not the worst place to be stuck if you go rooting around the outskirts it's surprisingly large with all the support services you would expect of a big seaport.
As you can see from the photo there's also a nice beach which is very popular with families.
Dover ferry company's do cheap day return tickets and many people go over for a day out and return stocked up with cheap booze as the wine and spirits are much cheaper in France due to taxes.
The Western entrance of the port gives access to Granville dock for passing cruisers.
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Old 10-22-2015, 02:36 AM   #94
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I mentioned in the previous post a photo of Hinckley pint nuclear power station which I omitted by mistake. apologies.
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Old 10-26-2015, 02:50 AM   #95
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One of the most noticeable things in Dover is the lack of British and Irish trucks making deliveries and collections to Europe via the ferries
The British government has taxed it's trucking industry so heavily that they are unable to compete on a level playing field with the former USSR satellite countries who have joined the European Union losing jobs and tax revenue of not only the trucking industry, but all it's support services too.
If a British/Irish truck goes to Europe it must pay a daily 'Vignette' to use the roads in addition to any motorways tolls, if a Romanian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czechoslovakian or Croatian truck comes to Britain they pay no tolls at all other than bridge tolls. the police don't stop them or check any papers and neither do the transport ministry.
Trucks are cheaper to buy there and their drivers are paid incredibly low wages.
So much for European Union, it's a disaster of a relationship for Great Britain and a far cry from the free trading agreement we signed up for in the first place.
illegal immigrants roam the streets and crime is increasing.
Sadly, that's the downside of Dover, despite that Dover is for all that a very nice place to visit.
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Old 10-28-2015, 11:46 PM   #96
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As any sane person would do we were waiting for favourable conditions for leaving Dover and the passage across the English channel, it can be a bit daunting but with careful planning it should present no problem.


We calculated tides, tidal flow and available daylight hours to complete the passage in daylight, we're completely equipped for night passages and I'm perfectly happy to cruise at night but teethmarks on the dashboard tell another story from the lady crew member.
We waited a week for the rough seas to subside before getting a good weather synopsis for the following day and left at 11am to punch the last hour of the ebb tide and use slack water before picking up a favourable tide to help us up along the French coast.
The English channel is in simple terms a marine motorway, there are two defined lanes, one going South West West, a central reservation and another lane going North East East for large ships. Wee guys like us must cross these shipping lanes at right angles in the same way that you cross a street and can navigate outside of the main ship channels as they wish, except for the sandbanks and occasional shipwreck of course.
The sea fog forecast was spot on but the sun just couldn't quite break through and burn it off, it's difficult to take photo's in the fog !
Placing our faith in maps, compass, Garmin 72 and Mark 1 eyeball we had an interesting cruise across and navigated the sandbanks that litter the French coast safely to Dunkirk.
Why Dunkirk ? firstly it offered a safe mooring in an inner secure locked marina, secondly if you read the news at all you can't have failed to see the immigrant hordes in Calais, although Calais is a shorter crossing with a marina I wasn't keen on seeing my pride & joy stolen, packed with illegal immigrants and back on it's way back to England and wrecked on a remote shoreline after it occupants have scrambled ashore and issued the only English they'll ever learn 'We wish to claim asylum and I would like a house and some money'.
I digress, we arrived in Dunkirk just as dusk was falling and tied up with relief at our waiting jetty in the marina Grand Large,, unfortunately it was also the seagulls home and apparent toilet, the local fishermen simply throw over board any unsaleable small fish and the jetty piles and harbour walls abound with mussels and oysters so these guys have a feast and they're nearly as incontinent as those in Brixham.
The local pilot boat station is also there and a couple of 800 horsepower engines without silencers cracking off tend to interrupt your slumbers but if you enter a working seaport these are the things that are just part and parcel of everyday life and breath life into a port.
There are 3 tidal marina's when you enter Dunkirk, the Grand Large is the first to port, the Yacht club Mer Du Nord is on your starboard with it's own clubhouse/restaurant/bar and the municipal marina which is really for locals and inshore fishermen.
A further 2 marina's in the inner port are accessed through sea locks and by contacting Dunkirk VTS by VHF you can access the Bassin du Marine by passing under two lifting bridges.
A further lock takes you into the canal system and we'll deal with that in the next adventure.
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Old 10-29-2015, 12:19 AM   #97
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Having organized our winter berth (hivernage) here in Dunkirk (Dunquerke) I decided it was time to sort out our vibration problems once and for all before we left 'Snow Mouse' tucked up for the cold winter months.
We lifted her out, replaced 3 engine mounts, withdrew the shaft, renewed bearings and discovered the PO had overtightened the stuffing box seal, over time this had worn a groove in the prop shaft, fortunately we were able to turn the shaft end for end and with a new PSS shaft seal eliminate any repeat, then we put everything back together taking great care to align engine and shaft.
The following photo's are self explanatory, look at the brown overheating marks on the old stuffing seal we removed some old systems used grease to lubricate the seal, others used water and later industrial steam packing impregnated with PTFE was used. The fitting of a PSS seal eliminates any need for it at all by using a stainless steel rotor against a fixed ceramic face. I've used one on my other boat for years without any leaks or drips
The first photo shows why you should use the correct stainless steel bolts when fitting boarding steps.
We didn't re anti foul because the hull is actually treated with 'Coppercoat', ie the gelcoat is impregnated with copper to stop anti fouling.
As you may know the sailing ships of yore used copper sheathing to stop the dreaded Teredo worm boring into the wooden hulls, 'Coppercoat' is simply a new method on an old proven theme.
Note also the 'fencing' and hole in the rudder, the fencing (horizontal blades) helps to grip the water flow over the face of the rudder and improves manoeuvrability at slow speeds, the hole in the rudder allows the shaft to be removed without dismantling the rudder assembly.
Sunrise over the boatyard.
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Old 10-29-2015, 12:51 AM   #98
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In Dunkirk there are 2 ports, one is industrial with an enormous factory as well as the ferry terminal and has all tide access, there's also access to the inland waterways system for large barges.
The other port is accessed by a sea lock which maintains depth in the port and is used by repair yards, warehousing sheds, the private boat marina and maritime museum.
Sadly this inner port is little used due to the trade unions greed, pure and simple.
Stevedores here were well paid and had early retirement with good pensions but they were continually on strike for yet more, the crafty burghers in Belgium and Holland sent them a lot of money 'In support of their French trade union brothers', this only encouraged the unions who thought they were on a roll.
Of course the ships went elsewhere to unload their cargoes, the docks and all the surrounding support services lost it's beating heart and went into steep decline.
Where did the all ships go ?
Why Belgium and Holland of course !
The 2 barges are, the large one lying low in the water is loaded with 1,350 tonnes of aggregates, it's generator engine is larger than my main engine..
The smaller barge is a 'Freycinet' gauge barge and would carry 350 tonnes when loaded.
The term 'Freycinet' refers to a French transport minister in the late 1800's who had the foresight to standardise all the canal locks at 40 metres long by 5 metres wide and barges were built to 'Freycinet standard' 39.5 metres long and 4.8 wide bringing commercial sense to the hitherto confusion of canal and barge sizes throughout the system, eliminating costly transhipment of cargoes.
Coming soon.
Operation Dynamo.
Dunkirk military Cemetery.
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Old 10-29-2015, 11:59 AM   #99
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As we say goodbye to tidal waters for a while it may be interesting to note that in the UK the strongest tides are found in Morecambe bay in Lancashire, so fast do these tides come in over the sands that some workers collecting shellfish some years ago couldn't outrun the tides to reach safety of the shore and were drowned.
Other places around the UK are The Swellies, The Bitches, The Whelps, The Gulf of Corryvreckan and Strangford Lough entrance where tides of up to 8/9 knots can be found.
Pentland Firth in Scotland has the strongest in the UK at 16 knots tides.
Skookumchuck narrows in Canada can boast 18 knots but the champion is Saltstraumen in Norway with an eye watering 22 knots.
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Old 10-29-2015, 12:25 PM   #100
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Operation Dynamo.
At the opening of WW2 Britain sent an expeditionary force to Europe to try and stop the German advance, the British were no match for the German Blitzkrieg (lightning strike) and were driven back to Dunkirk in one of the worst defeats in British military history.
The Germans for some unknown reason halted their advance just short of Dunkirk.
Winston Churchill immediately put in place Operation Dynamo in which every conceivable vessel that could float was used to snatch men from the beaches in Dunkirk whilst under constant attack from Stuka dive bombers and machine gun fire.
Of the 450,000 men caught in the debacle 350,000 were snatched from the jaws of death in this operation which undoubtedly saved Britain from German occupation.
The Germans captured 80 men and cold bloodedly massacred them in some woods just a few kilometres outside Dunkirk, others lost their life in the defence and lie in Dunkirk Military cemetery.
The small ships that took part in operation Dynamo were given a plaque in honour of their service to the country and annually those 'Dunkirk Little Ships' as they're known, who survived and are still seaworthy make an annual pilgrimage under Royal Navy escort back to Dunkirk in Remembrance of those who lost their life in Operation Dynamo.
Photo's.
Dunkirk beach as it is today. The bunker from which the defence of Dunkirk was directed.
Defence gun.
Note, the museum in Dunkirk is open everyday from 10 am until 5pm from May until September.
The gentleman playing the Scottish bagpipes was an ex soldier( whom I spoke to after he finished playing).
He came to play a series of reels, jigs and laments with a finale of 'The Flowers Of The Forest' which brought a tear to my eye in honour of his ex regiments fallen.
Lest We Forget.
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