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Old 09-09-2014, 06:46 PM   #1161
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@Richard, time to forget that Bourbon stuff and to become a member of the Scottish Malt Wiskey Society........

LINK: The Scottish Malt Wiskey Society

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Old 09-09-2014, 07:48 PM   #1162
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Richard,
I am curious as to how much fuel you actually had left when you arrived.
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Old 09-09-2014, 09:17 PM   #1163
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Yea crossing the North Atlantic in the winter is madness! 15ft seas daily at minimum. I got the snot beat out of me on 285ft ship.
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:23 AM   #1164
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Reiziger,
Richard is in Ireland not Scotland so should imagine he is drinking Irish Whiskey of which there are plenty of different brands, single malt and pot and Guinness.
He will be well catered for.
Cheers
Benn
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Old 09-10-2014, 10:08 AM   #1165
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Benn,

There are many single malt Irish whiskeys. They are made the same as Scotch. The typical Irish whiskey has rye in the grain bill but single malt is only 100% barley no matter where it comes from.

Here are just a few.
Bushmills 16 Year Old (70cl, 40%)

The "Old Bushmills" Distillery Company
A 16 year old Irish single malt from Bushmills aged in three different cask types: bourbon, port and sherry. The result is a beautiful whiskey which was awarded Gold at the 2010 San Francisco World... More info



Tyrconnell Irish Whiskey (70cl, 40%)

Cooley
A single malt Irish whiskey from the Cooley distillery, Tyrconnell is incredibly creamy and smooth. More info



Connemara Peated (70cl, 40%)

Cooley
Connemara produce a peated Irish single malt, named for the area in Ireland. More info



There are many more and in fact, they rival the Scottish whiskeys.
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Old 09-10-2014, 12:10 PM   #1166
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Yea crossing the North Atlantic in the winter is madness! 15ft seas daily at minimum. I got the snot beat out of me on 285ft ship.
As part of my weather edimication, I started watching the weather charts in the N Atlantic and N Pacific early this past winter. Now, I "knew" that the lows at the higher latitudes were pretty nasty but seeing the size of some of those storms is an education in itself. No way would I want to be out there in one of those storms. 285 feet of ship is not big enough.

I saw some lows this past winter that took up much of the N. Atlantic with strong winds and waves predicted, key word, at 6-7 meters. Those waves are the AVERAGE tallest waves so there would be much larger waves from time to time depending on fetch distance and age of the storm.

Here is a video of a 700+ foot long container ship in the North Atlantic taking 30-44 degree rolls.

Containership Taking 40 Degree Roll in North Atlantic [WATCH] - gCaptain Maritime & Offshore News

Later,
Dan
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Old 09-10-2014, 12:24 PM   #1167
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Those seas are madness on steroids. Not for me. I've been there and now I'm a fair weather sailor.
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Old 09-10-2014, 12:47 PM   #1168
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Those seas are madness on steroids. Not for me. I've been there and now I'm a fair weather sailor.
Might be fun strapped into a CG rescue boat that can do 180's and self-right, coming up correctly... still running every time... for about 40 minute timespan tops that is! - LOL
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:51 PM   #1169
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I've written a whole new post, but it's on my computer.

I'm having a beer, it's cheaper than wine, and one of my points in the post, is that one must adapt.
Probably should have had a Guinness.
I'm tied to a fishing boat, third one out.

I did a masterful job, after almost making a f... ing mess of it, by thinking I was giving it full rt rudder when it was to port.


Almost t boned the fv.

Gotta go.
Battery dying and then I won't have anything to read.
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Old 09-12-2014, 02:13 PM   #1170
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The Pot Boils

I posted this on my blog, but you guys deserve the first look too.
Also, videos are linked in the blog and I will be adding everyting to dauntless.smugmug.com

The Pot Boils

Its midnight, and I see that the starboard Racor is full of crap, I switch to the Port Racor and return to the pilot house to contemplate my next moves.
The wind had stayed steady at SW at 30 kts. I was getting used to the roll, 20į in one direction, 30į in the other, certainly the biggest rolls Iíve ever seen since having the paravanes. I needed to sleep. I reasoned that the engine was running, the Racor had done its job, and by switching to the new Racor, I reckoned it should last at worst till morning, but more than likely till my destination, only 25 hours away.

I must have gotten pretty good rest, as there are no log entries from midnight, when I switched to port Racor until 07:00 when I recorded our position and noted, ďLast night for a whileĒ . I was ready for this to end, but, like March, it was going to go out like a lion. My roll ďtelltaleĒ had the biggest roll to one side overnight as 23į Not so bad. I decided to use this relatively quiet period to change the Racors and FP filters, all three.
At 7:20, I wrote in the log 7:20, with nothing else. I must have been tired, but I assume thatís when I went to change Racors, as next log entry was at 08:10 when I wrote underway again, changed all 3 Racors. The key there was underway again.

Usually I can now change all three in 15 minutes with the engine running. This took 40, as we had some drama. FP filter and right side filter were done quickly, but in priming the filter, the shenanigans began. When I first turned on fuel pump to prime right side filter, nothing happened, because it was turned off, remember I was running on left side filter. Now in hindsight, I see what I should have done, but if wishes were horses, Ö

But instead I opened the two valves around pump, leaving the third one open. In this configuration, the fuel pump is pumping fuel, but only in a little circle, while it laughs at me for giving it such easy work. Ok, got it, switch to right filter, close gravity feed, prime filter, itís done and engine is still running. Pump off, gravity feed on.

Now to the left side filter. Drain, open, remove old filter, new in, all in one minute, now to prime, change engine to this filter as I turn on pump, but gravity feed is still open. So nothing happens in filter and it doesnít fill. Engine starts to slow down, I know I only have seconds left to solve this before I kill engine in 10 foot seas.

As I turn the red handle of the gravity feed to off, so pump can fill filter and feed engine, the engine dies.

Crap. I vowed never to let this happen and it does. OK. Now being alone is a PIA, as I must leave engine room to start engine. I figure, OK, at least I can now take my time and finish job. I prime filter, turn off pump, close valves and scamper up stairs to salon and the pilot house.

Start engine. It sounds so sweet as it runs for about 10 seconds and then dies. Walk, Donít Run, back to engine room, sit next to engine, what did I do wrong?

I have it! I let air get to engine mounted fuel filters (there are two in series right after the mechanical lift pump (fuel pump that ďliftsĒ fuel from near bottom of engine to top of engine). The BIG lesson here is ALWAYS check simplest solutions first. (At times, I think I donít check the simple solution first, because it canít be that easy.)

So, all I need to do is bleed these engine mounted filters. Easy, the box end wrench is hanging right here just for this occasion (all the wrenches needed for all these jobs are hanging right there). I loosen both bleed screws (yes, book says one at a time, but Iím in a hurry).

Turn on pump, nothing. Look frantically around. See all three valves are closed, duh, open the two for the pump and turn on switch, as at that same moment, I realize I did not have to open bleed screws as all three valves were closed, in other words, nothing was open for the engine.

In the one second for that realization to hit home, the fuel is getting to the bleed screws and spraying fuel all over the hot engine. I turn off pump, reset all valves to their correct positons and get my oil soak cloths and start wiping away. Iím not that concerned, because I have not found any place on the top of the engine that is ever above 200įF and besides, if you think this is the first time Iíve done fiasco, you have another think coming.

I wipe down everything, also Racors, where I made a mess thinking they were the problem and finally at 8:19 Iím up at the wheel starting the engine again. This time it starts running, but clearly not well, but I also recognize this and know that with a little throttle, all will be fine in 20 seconds.
Iím underway again at 8:20.

Interestingly enough, even with the waves and seas, I did not seem to notice how well the Krogen handled sitting in the middle of the ocean bobbin away. Too much in crisis mode and not observation mode I suppose.

Three hours later, I check the fuel filters again and am dismayed at the amount of crap the filters are picking up, I change the FP and the port filter again. This time with no drama.

A new issue, the bilge pump has gone off 250 times in the last 24 hours. Usually it goes off 10 times, in rough weather maybe 20 to 30 times, if my stuffing box is really leaking, Iíve seen 180 times, but never this many. Now the rolling had increased to almost 20į and 30į in each direction, a delta of 50į (certainly a new record for me) and the decks were wet with water flooding in the scuppers, with the starboard deck sometimes having water flood over the cap rail (another first for me).

There are no obvious leaks anywhere either in the engine room or in the cabin, so I decide not to worry about it, since there is no obvious solution. Like the Racors, the bilge pump is doing its job.

A couple of hours later, the last act of this drama. I hear a thump, not loud, look to port and see no paravanes pole. Bad. Engine at idle and neutral, I find the top of the pole near the stern of the boat, being held there by its foreguy.

It takes me half an hour to get it out of the water and tied to the fly deck, because I have to run all over the place, loosen that line, pull here, tighten that line, pull there. Three times I have to come off the fly bridge just to rotate the pole that is hung up on the rub rail.

Also, with all the adrenaline surging thru my veins, I did not really notice how well dauntless was behaving just bobbin up and down, with really not much roll.

So I tried running without the paravanes out. My course was due north, and the winds and seas were from the southwest to west. At this point I was going to Ireland or else. Having people meeting me there was really encouraging at this point I did not want to go anywhere else.

Therefore the course we had was the course we were going to travel. Without paravanes out, it was the Dauntless of old and this course was not possible. Umm, the boat would have been fine, but not me.

So, I put the starboard pole and bird back out, not bad, not bad at all I think, but as time passed, I realized the starboard side was taking water over the rail almost constantly, since when D rolled to the right, the roll was deeper without the port bird to slow it down, but then the boat stayed longer in the starboard heeled position, allowing the next wave to essentially push Dauntless into the side of the wave as it rolled under the boat. At one point, I had two feet of water sloshing around the cockpit and side deck.

That wasnít going to work either. I then returned to the fly bridge, to untie the bird from the top of the pole. I spent way too much time doing that and in the meantime, this caused my scariest moment of the entire passage to date. The boat underway was rolling a lot. It did not occur to me to stop the boat because my little brain was more afraid of broaching than anything else. Now you are thinking, didnít he just talk about how little the boat rolled lying a hull, just in the paragraph above?

And the answer is YES, of course I did. But at the time, doing something and reflecting on it are two different actions, but pretty much no learning takes place without that reflection. I was too much in crisis mode to reflect on anything. So with me up on the fly bridge, Iím really seeing how big these waves are. Some are clearly at my eye level, maybe 16 feet above sea level. And they are hitting the boat on its beam. The first time the boat rolled and Iím hanging on for dear life up there, I was a bit nervous. It felt like we were over 80į, by telltale later told me it was only 38į

But again, once me and D had survived the first roll, I realized it wasnít that bad, in fact, I just stayed seated on the port bench, bracing myself with my foot on the helm chair, as the boat rolled.

Finally I get the knot undone and I decide to throw the fish in the water with 18í of line, tied in the amidships cleat, figuring it could not get back to the prop or rudder and it was better than nothing.

It was better than nothing. Even though an hour later, on hearing a thumping noise, and not being able to pin point it, I actually convinced myself it was the bird hitting the boat (it wasnít) but proceeded to stop the boat, then pull this bird back out of the water, shorten the line another two feet and finally, throw it back in the water (this is actually an abbreviated account. I did a few other things, but you had to be there to understand).
Finally I told myself to get a grip and proceeded to find the wine bottle that was rolling under the desk in the second cabin thunking the wall every 30 seconds, which is exactly what I thought it was an hour before.

I had no log entries between 14:00 when I threw the bird back in the water and 01:00 the following morning when I was passing Mizen Head light house.
I did record the rolling though, for those 11 hours, the boat was rolling a delta of 24į, 36į and a whopping 61į (23+38) every so often.

That afternoon, I was wedged on the bench, playing hearts, trying to keep my mind off the sea state, the waves, and the fuel.

As evening turned to night, it was very dark, the winds were 30 knots gusting to 45 out of the due west. The waves were above 16 feet so I spent most of that time lying on the bench with my head to the port side, so I did not feel like I was standing on my head. The worst part was as the boat would be heeled far over, it was stay there a bit and then since itís dark, the next wave hits suddenly with a big bang on the exposed starboard hull, pushing us further into the side of the wave.

Even now, itís hard to describe my feelings. I was certainly miserable, but not really afraid. The roller coaster is probably the best analogy in that is still makes us afraid, even though we know it can not fly off the tracks. I was afraid to go to sleep. Rocky land was only 15 to 20 miles away and even though it would take hours to get there, countless boats have come to grief so near their final destination, I was not going to let that happen to me.
But Monkey Son still had that smile on his face, so I knew it would be OK.
And it was, I had carefully planned my route using both Coastal Explorer and my Navionics app on my phone, as Navionics showed the lighthouse range colors better.

Karel had given me really clear instructions, so when I saw people standing on the dock at 01:40 in the morning of August 29th, 2014, I knew our Atlantic Passage was over.
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Old 09-12-2014, 04:07 PM   #1171
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I actually put together a video and posted it on YouTube of the hurricane we went through.
I've also been though a NorEaster that made me wish I were back in that hurricane. It blew up off the coast of Va/NC, 100kt winds. Yea, I won't be sailing a small boat across the Atlantic in the winter!
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Old 09-12-2014, 04:38 PM   #1172
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I actually put together a video and posted it on YouTube of the hurricane we went through.
....
Link to the YouTube video?

Thanks,
Dan
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Old 09-12-2014, 08:04 PM   #1173
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Quote:
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Karel had given me really clear instructions, so when I saw people standing on the dock at 01:40 in the morning of August 29th, 2014, I knew our Atlantic Passage was over.
Wow. Just simply wow. Thank you for the ocean crossing, and your description of the final hours. (wiping brow)

WE did well, eh? Congratulations, sincerely.

Can't wait to read more.
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Old 09-13-2014, 01:57 PM   #1174
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Lots of great stuff there, Richard! That's a good read, but you know...we like photos, too.
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Old 09-13-2014, 03:23 PM   #1175
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Lots of great stuff there, Richard! That's a good read, but you know...we like photos, too.
I put them in the blog because it's really difficult to upload photos for TF.
So blog has same text, but videos and photos.

I will also upload all to Smugmug.
But internet had been a challenge for me.

I'm hoping that once settled in Waterford, things will be a bit easier.
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Old 09-14-2014, 03:47 AM   #1176
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UOTE=dannc;267117]Link to the YouTube video?

Thanks,
Dan[/QUOTE]

Last post about me, I'm not stealing this man's thunder! He earned it!



For some reason, youtube wont allow me to change the settings so you can watch it on a mobile device. You'll have to watch it on a good old fashioned PC.
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Old 09-14-2014, 04:52 AM   #1177
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I put them in the blog because it's really difficult to upload photos for TF.
So blog has same text, but videos and photos.

I will also upload all to Smugmug.
But internet had been a challenge for me.

I'm hoping that once settled in Waterford, things will be a bit easier.
Go into a meteor mobile phone shop, buy a Huawei 3G router that sits in your pilot house (Ä80?) which can connect up to 5 ipads etc at one time; it's pay as you go at Ä20/month no contract for 7.5 gigs download, and it's very very fast at 4-5mbs.........

Meteor.ie

PS: a refurb unit is only Ä29.99.....https://store.meteor.ie/mobile-broad...?linkid=footer
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Old 09-14-2014, 05:04 AM   #1178
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Last post about me, I'm not stealing this man's thunder! He earned it!

.
And he certainly did. But thanks for that video. Hell's Bells. Nothing could be more appropriate as music goes.
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Old 09-14-2014, 08:45 AM   #1179
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Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
I actually put together a video and posted it on YouTube of the hurricane we went through.
I've also been though a NorEaster that made me wish I were back in that hurricane. It blew up off the coast of Va/NC, 100kt winds. Yea, I won't be sailing a small boat across the Atlantic in the winter!
Thanks, even though I can't see yours yet, the next one in line, ship in hurricane, was the video I was referring to.
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Old 09-26-2014, 02:37 PM   #1180
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I moved the Marm video and related posts to this thread.

Trawler video: summer 2014 : Monterey Bay
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