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Old 12-02-2014, 11:31 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by hollywood8118 View Post
I believe the 47,50,57,64 all have rear "collision" bulkheads that are watertight.

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That's news to me... I've seen the lazarettes on a couple of the Nordies you mention (the 47 and the 64) but I don't recall seeing a "watertight" collision bulkhead. I do recall seeing a small opening with a door but I don't recall that door being a "watertight" collision bulkhead. Any pics?
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:21 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by Diesel Duck 492 View Post
That's news to me... I've seen the lazarettes on a couple of the Nordies you mention (the 47 and the 64) but I don't recall seeing a "watertight" collision bulkhead. I do recall seeing a small opening with a door but I don't recall that door being a "watertight" collision bulkhead. Any pics?
looks watertight to me..

The 57 I spend time on has a really nice aluminum door with dbl lever dog style latches and a thick gasket also.

below is a link that shows the edge of a rear bulkhead door in a 50..

http://www.nordhavn.com/brokerage/listings/sally_g/#

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Old 12-03-2014, 03:40 PM   #63
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looks watertight to me..

The 57 I spend time on has a really nice aluminum door with dbl lever dog style latches and a thick gasket also.

below is a link that shows the edge of a rear bulkhead door in a 50..

Welcome to Nordhavn.com - Power Thats Oceans Apart

HOLLYWOOD
Yup, the door in the photo you've posted looks watertight to me too. Which of the Norhavn's is that photo from? Also, my memory of the door/hatch separating the engine room from the laz was more of the type of door on the N50, with only one door latch. That door/hatch didn't appear to me to be a "collision" watertight bulkhead type of door. Any Nordy owners out there care to chime in?
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Old 12-03-2014, 05:24 PM   #64
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A watertight door does not make a watertight bulkhead. First of all the bulkhead has to be strong enough to withstand the pressure of having one side filled with water. Then each and every penetration(each wire, pipe, shaft, vent, etc) of that bulkhead must receive considerable attention so it remains watertight under pressure. Watertight doors are useless unless routinely kept shut and dogged. Two people drowned and the Queen of the North sank partly because the watertight doors each end of the engine room were routinely left open (it was cooler that way).

No Classification society will allow any openings in a real (forward) collision bulkhead. Arguably the bulkheads forward of the rudderstock and fore and aft of the engine room are more likely to be called upon in a yacht. Commercial vessels spend a lot of hours under way and seem more inclined to be involved in a collision. Pleasure craft are rarely in collisions but do occasionally knock the rudder out of the boat or have a "high-water in the engine room" incident.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:06 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by Diesel Duck 492 View Post
Yup, the door in the photo you've posted looks watertight to me too. Which of the Norhavn's is that photo from? Also, my memory of the door/hatch separating the engine room from the laz was more of the type of door on the N50, with only one door latch. That door/hatch didn't appear to me to be a "collision" watertight bulkhead type of door. Any Nordy owners out there care to chime in?

That's looks like a 76 or 64.
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Old 12-03-2014, 07:47 PM   #66
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A watertight door does not make a watertight bulkhead. First of all the bulkhead has to be strong enough to withstand the pressure of having one side filled with water. Then each and every penetration(each wire, pipe, shaft, vent, etc) of that bulkhead must receive considerable attention so it remains watertight under pressure. Watertight doors are useless unless routinely kept shut and dogged. Two people drowned and the Queen of the North sank partly because the watertight doors each end of the engine room were routinely left open (it was cooler that way).

No Classification society will allow any openings in a real (forward) collision bulkhead. Arguably the bulkheads forward of the rudderstock and fore and aft of the engine room are more likely to be called upon in a yacht. Commercial vessels spend a lot of hours under way and seem more inclined to be involved in a collision. Pleasure craft are rarely in collisions but do occasionally knock the rudder out of the boat or have a "high-water in the engine room" incident.
Tad:

Thanks for chiming in on this, I appreciate the education.
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Old 12-11-2014, 05:53 PM   #67
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Sorry for the recent lack of photos but family and work have consumed all of my time.

Here is an image of the sea chest in the engine room. The other DDs I have seen have the "shorter" sea chest not the tall one shown here. The taller sea chest extends above the water line so one could open the sea chest to clear a problem with out flooding the engine room.

This is yet another photo where the dumb photographer did not take enough images. On the other DD's the shorter sea chest has multiple valves for the various salt water feeds into the boat. I think these valves are hidden in this photo by the taller sea chest.



Later,
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