Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-24-2014, 02:27 PM   #21
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Kangeroo View Post
They are indeed gorgeous boats. I want one!

Call me picky, but unless I'm not seeing it correctly, not cutting the floor supports off on an angle to fully meet with the hull rib is just plain laziness or are these only temporary?

No, I don't think that is being picky. IF there is a POTENTIAL characteristic of boats made in China it is to have what can't be seen easily built to a different standard than that which can be seen. The question is whether it matters or not, and that is probably a matter of choice as often as it is a matter of engineering.

I would also not characterize what little I can see of the coatings in this area to be what I would like to see....
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 04:33 PM   #22
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scary View Post
The boats were in Olympia Washington. They were privately owned Ducks shown to me by the Sea Horse dealer. I believe they were built by Sea Horse. The photos you've presented look good. What I saw wasn't nearly as nice as the 52 at that time. I'm sure you've done your due diligence. And I'm sure your boat will be beautiful. That was my impression then. As to coatings, nothing is forever. I'm old enough to remember when balsa coring was thought to be forever and highly touted, polyester encapsulated plywood would never rot, so many said, why not use shop plywood for coring. We've all seen the folly in that. I'm sure the coatings will hold up fine, and a little hidden rust , probably no big deal. If these boats are rigged as well as their glass boats you'll have a hell of a boat.
The photos I have seen of one of the DD 462 interiors, I think it was hull 2, looks like what I am seeing in person. The photos of the DD 382's have been similar quality. Early on, SHM built a few DD 44s and DD 48s. Maybe you were seeing DD 44's or 48's that SHM first built years ago?

Did you see a boat like this:



2006 Diesel Duck Custom Diesel Duck Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

I agree about wood coring. I just don't trust that the wood will not get wet from deck or hull penetrations.

My truck is about to start it's 14 the year and it has no rust. The only time I was the truck is when there is salt on the road but then I only hose out the undercarriage and I have not done that in years. The truck is dirty but there is no rust or scratches on the paint job.

The epoxy paint on the interior hull is pretty thick and then is covered with insulation to prevent condensation and of course insulate the boat. The condensation problems I have heard about have been on port holes and the pilot house windows. Same problem you have in a house. Anyway, the insulation protects that paint and the paint should not degrade, at least not in my lifetime. This is standard metal boat building practice that has worked for decades both in practice and in actual boats.

The key is the surface prep and painting has to be done correctly. If that paint is not done right there can/will be problems. I know one owner had his inspector use a device to measure the thickness of the interior paint which is a VERY good idea.

Later,
Dan
__________________

dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 04:37 PM   #23
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Kangeroo View Post
They are indeed gorgeous boats. I want one!

Call me picky, but unless I'm not seeing it correctly, not cutting the floor supports off on an angle to fully meet with the hull rib is just plain laziness or are these only temporary?
I was wondering if someone would notice those supports.

It is not temporary but I am not sure it matters though. The sole is rock solid. I was jumping up and down in that area and nothing was moving.

Jumping up and down on a floor is a habit I picked up when looking at houses. If there is a lot of noise, bouncing or flexing you will know. Course any many houses, just walking across the floor causes bouncing and noise.

Later,
Dan
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 04:48 PM   #24
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
No, I don't think that is being picky. IF there is a POTENTIAL characteristic of boats made in China it is to have what can't be seen easily built to a different standard than that which can be seen. The question is whether it matters or not, and that is probably a matter of choice as often as it is a matter of engineering.

I would also not characterize what little I can see of the coatings in this area to be what I would like to see....
What do you not like in the coatings?

The image is not great because I have downsized and resized them for Internet viewing. There are colors showing that are not really there and there are some downsizing artifacts as well.

The area is really solid white in the bilge and supports. The paint is thick and not thin at all on the hull. There is an earlier photo looking down into the bilge that is a more color/artifact accurate photo after being downsized and resized.

Later,
Dan
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 07:15 PM   #25
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 636
Lets see how this new image works. It looks better on my website so lets see if it works better here.



That looks better. Less moire and fake colors.

FYI, I took this photo by putting the camera under the sole and taking a photo. This is towards the bow and under a double bed. I don't know if there is access from the bed structure into the space forward. If not, one would have to slide through the sole hatch to get into the space which a couple of short boards or plywood would help accomplish but it would be tight.

The two angle irons that are not cut flush to the ribs are welded into place. They should have been cut to match the angle of the ribs but they are not moving as is and the center post is really taking up the load. Frankly, the centerpiece is likely all that is needed from a structure point of view.

Thinking about this through a bit it would be better if the two "angled" posts were not there and two vertical posts were welded on the flat part of the rib where the rib angles up the bilge. This would allow "easier" access to the bow if you had to climb up there or store materials.

Later,
Dan
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 08:22 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
BryanF's Avatar


 
City: Astoria
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Florence A
Vessel Model: 47' Sutton
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 173
The two pieces that are not cut to fit are not vertical either. Makes me think that they where tacked in to hold things in place while getting it all lined up. Then, the welder forgot to take them out. It happens to the best of us. If it is the only thing on a project the size of one of these boats then you are really lucky. Overall, the quality of the build looks good to me but each will have their own opinion.
BryanF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 08:28 PM   #27
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanF View Post
The two pieces that are not cut to fit are not vertical either. Makes me think that they where tacked in to hold things in place while getting it all lined up. Then, the welder forgot to take them out. It happens to the best of us. If it is the only thing on a project the size of one of these boats then you are really lucky. Overall, the quality of the build looks good to me but each will have their own opinion.
BryonF,

If your boat has not been posted on the "Interesting Boats" thread, it should be. That looks like a great boat.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 08:32 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
BryanF's Avatar


 
City: Astoria
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Florence A
Vessel Model: 47' Sutton
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 173
Don- I think you will find Florence A back on about page 29 of interesting boats. If you search Jay Stoddard George Sutton you should find her.
And yes, I and everyone who has looked at her says interesting boat. Thanks.
BryanF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 10:55 PM   #29
Guru
 
hollywood8118's Avatar
 
City: Port Townsend Washington
Country: USA
Vessel Name: " OTTER "
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander Europa 40
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
The photos I have seen of one of the DD 462 interiors, I think it was hull 2, looks like what I am seeing in person. The photos of the DD 382's have been similar quality. Early on, SHM built a few DD 44s and DD 48s. Maybe you were seeing DD 44's or 48's that SHM first built years ago?

Did you see a boat like this:



2006 Diesel Duck Custom Diesel Duck Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

I agree about wood coring. I just don't trust that the wood will not get wet from deck or hull penetrations.

My truck is about to start it's 14 the year and it has no rust. The only time I was the truck is when there is salt on the road but then I only hose out the undercarriage and I have not done that in years. The truck is dirty but there is no rust or scratches on the paint job.

The epoxy paint on the interior hull is pretty thick and then is covered with insulation to prevent condensation and of course insulate the boat. The condensation problems I have heard about have been on port holes and the pilot house windows. Same problem you have in a house. Anyway, the insulation protects that paint and the paint should not degrade, at least not in my lifetime. This is standard metal boat building practice that has worked for decades both in practice and in actual boats.

The key is the surface prep and painting has to be done correctly. If that paint is not done right there can/will be problems. I know one owner had his inspector use a device to measure the thickness of the interior paint which is a VERY good idea.

Later,
Dan

10&2 is not a Asian Duck
It was built here in Port Townsend and is no doubt the best built Duck ever. The welds EVERYWHERE are perfect.. it is a work of art.
There used to be a Dark Blue hulled Asian DD here in P.T. that was a mess. It was a few years old at the time and had rust bleed everywhere.. the paint system had to be shoddy at best for a 3 or so year old boat to have rust bleeds on the side of the hull

The weld quality on some of the first pics in this thread looked pretty suspect also.. look at the primed hull bow pic.

Comparing 10&2 to the Asian Ducks is like comparing the quality of a early Russian Mig to a Lockheed airframe of recent vintage.

To be fair, the first Nordhavn was a piece of crap.. they learned their lesson in a hurry.. the rest is history.
Also.. if I could afford it I would buy 10&2.. the only one I have personally seen that I can say that about so far.

HOLLYWOOD
hollywood8118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2014, 11:42 PM   #30
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
What do you not like in the coatings?

The image is not great because I have downsized and resized them for Internet viewing. There are colors showing that are not really there and there are some downsizing artifacts as well.

The area is really solid white in the bilge and supports. The paint is thick and not thin at all on the hull. There is an earlier photo looking down into the bilge that is a more color/artifact accurate photo after being downsized and resized.

Later,
Dan
Hard to tell from the picture, but it just looks a bit thin, and the drips speak of a bit of carelessness in application. But as I said, hard to tell from the picture.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 10:13 AM   #31
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollywood8118 View Post
10&2 is not a Asian Duck
It was built here in Port Townsend and is no doubt the best built Duck ever. The welds EVERYWHERE are perfect.. it is a work of art.
There used to be a Dark Blue hulled Asian DD here in P.T. that was a mess. It was a few years old at the time and had rust bleed everywhere.. the paint system had to be shoddy at best for a 3 or so year old boat to have rust bleeds on the side of the hull

The weld quality on some of the first pics in this thread looked pretty suspect also.. look at the primed hull bow pic.

Comparing 10&2 to the Asian Ducks is like comparing the quality of a early Russian Mig to a Lockheed airframe of recent vintage.

To be fair, the first Nordhavn was a piece of crap.. they learned their lesson in a hurry.. the rest is history.
Also.. if I could afford it I would buy 10&2.. the only one I have personally seen that I can say that about so far.

HOLLYWOOD
Yes, the welds are certainly not stacked dimes but the welds are x-rayed so they are sound.

I was not comparing the Townsend boats with SHM, just trying to figure out which boats he could have seen. I THINK there might be another builder of DD's in Asia since I have read of certain sized DD's in Asia but they were not built by SHM. I think the Townsend DD cost well over $1 million dollars and while the welds might be better looking, the Townsend interior is not anywhere close to a SHM interior.

How long ago did you see the blue hulled DD? Did the boat have the sugar scoop swim step? If it did, it is a SHM boat, if not, well we still don't know who built it. A couple of the first SHM built DD's were blue or black hulled, it is hard to tell from the photos and they were DD 44's or 48s without the sugar scoop swim step.

Later,
Dan
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 10:26 AM   #32
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
Lets see how this new image works. It looks better on my website so lets see if it works better here.



That looks better. Less moire and fake colors.

FYI, I took this photo by putting the camera under the sole and taking a photo. This is towards the bow and under a double bed. I don't know if there is access from the bed structure into the space forward. If not, one would have to slide through the sole hatch to get into the space which a couple of short boards or plywood would help accomplish but it would be tight.

The two angle irons that are not cut flush to the ribs are welded into place. They should have been cut to match the angle of the ribs but they are not moving as is and the center post is really taking up the load. Frankly, the centerpiece is likely all that is needed from a structure point of view.

Thinking about this through a bit it would be better if the two "angled" posts were not there and two vertical posts were welded on the flat part of the rib where the rib angles up the bilge. This would allow "easier" access to the bow if you had to climb up there or store materials.

Later,
Dan
Not being familiar with steel boat construction methods, a question please. Do steel boats have longitudinal stringers for reinforcement? I know there is a strong keel. Just wondering if the stringers die before the bow section, or there are none. Probably would be necessary for the engine bed.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 10:59 AM   #33
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
Not being familiar with steel boat construction methods, a question please. Do steel boats have longitudinal stringers for reinforcement? I know there is a strong keel. Just wondering if the stringers die before the bow section, or there are none. Probably would be necessary for the engine bed.
I did not see a boat at that level of construction but in the photo you can see the stringers running fore and aft. I suspect they terminate in the forward collision bulkhead which is a few feet behind the bow. The space between the bow and the collision bulkhead is the anchor locker which has a water tight door.

I did not lift the ER plates in the two DDs in China but from what I remember from looking at a DD 462 in May there was substantial structure holding the engine. As I mentioned earlier the bow is made from a 3-4 inch metal bar, not pipe, bar. I have been told the hull chine plates are welded to smaller bar running fore and aft.

There anchor compartment is a watertight and the stateroom forward has a water tight door and bulkhead. The aft stateroom also has a watertight door and bulkhead. The swim step is a rear collision bulk head on MOST DD 462s but a stern thruster looses that feature. I will post on this later. The rear step also can hold fuel tanks that contain 400 gallons. The other fuel tanks are amidship and integrated with the hull so the boat has a double bottom. This also makes the boat very rigid.

So basically you have two water tight compartments forward and aft. This leaves quite a bit of volume in between that is a flooding vulnerability. One CAN have a water tight door and bulkhead between the ER/galley and the salon but only a few owners have done this. The door would be problematic.

I would prefer to have the water tight door/bulkhead at the galley/ER but the door is a problem. A water tight door/bulkhead would drastically reduce flooding volume and at least buy the crew some time. Flip side is that the hull structure is so strong would you get a hole in the first place?

The advantage of steel is its ability to deform before failure and with the strong structure behind the hull plating it would take one heck of a collision to hole the boat. One DD 462 sat on a reef for weeks before it was refloated, one hit an ice berg, and one hit a rock on a flood tide at 13ish knots. None of these boats had hull damage. The one that hit a rock did have rudder damage when it slid/bounced of the rock and the stern hit another rock. One boat at the SHM yard was hit by a ship that broke loose from the neighboring ship yard during a storm. The DD had its paint scratched and you can't tell there was a collision.

So given the above, do you really need the ER/galley water tight door and bulkhead? Only two owners think so.

Later,
Dan
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 11:05 AM   #34
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollywood8118 View Post
10&2 is not a Asian Duck
It was built here in Port Townsend and is no doubt the best built Duck ever. The welds EVERYWHERE are perfect.. it is a work of art.
There used to be a Dark Blue hulled Asian DD here in P.T. that was a mess. It was a few years old at the time and had rust bleed everywhere.. the paint system had to be shoddy at best for a 3 or so year old boat to have rust bleeds on the side of the hull

The weld quality on some of the first pics in this thread looked pretty suspect also.. look at the primed hull bow pic.

Comparing 10&2 to the Asian Ducks is like comparing the quality of a early Russian Mig to a Lockheed airframe of recent vintage.

To be fair, the first Nordhavn was a piece of crap.. they learned their lesson in a hurry.. the rest is history.
Also.. if I could afford it I would buy 10&2.. the only one I have personally seen that I can say that about so far.

HOLLYWOOD
I think I remember seeing that boat at Trawler Fest a few years ago. When you see the exterior paint breaking down, you really have to wonder about the bits you can't see. This just goes back to my original point. If you want to have a steel boat that is as easy to maintain as a fiberglass boat you have to have a great paint job. That involves taking really seriously the manufacturer's recommendations for how quickly after blasting are the first coats of primer applied, how many are applied to what thickness at what temperature, and what goes over the top of all of that and when. If there is any place for a yard to eff up the build process that will cause the most headaches for the owner, it is in coatings on a steel boat, IMO.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 11:07 AM   #35
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
I did not see a boat at that level of construction but in the photo you can see the stringers running fore and aft. I suspect they terminate in the forward collision bulkhead which is a few feet behind the bow. The space between the bow and the collision bulkhead is the anchor locker which has a water tight door.

I did not lift the ER plates in the two DDs in China but from what I remember from looking at a DD 462 in May there was substantial structure holding the engine. As I mentioned earlier the bow is made from a 3-4 inch metal bar, not pipe, bar. I have been told the hull chine plates are welded to smaller bar running fore and aft.

There anchor compartment is a watertight and the stateroom forward has a water tight door and bulkhead. The aft stateroom also has a watertight door and bulkhead. The swim step is a rear collision bulk head on MOST DD 462s but a stern thruster looses that feature. I will post on this later. The rear step also can hold fuel tanks that contain 400 gallons. The other fuel tanks are amidship and integrated with the hull so the boat has a double bottom. This also makes the boat very rigid.

So basically you have two water tight compartments forward and aft. This leaves quite a bit of volume in between that is a flooding vulnerability. One CAN have a water tight door and bulkhead between the ER/galley and the salon but only a few owners have done this. The door would be problematic.

I would prefer to have the water tight door/bulkhead at the galley/ER but the door is a problem. A water tight door/bulkhead would drastically reduce flooding volume and at least buy the crew some time. Flip side is that the hull structure is so strong would you get a hole in the first place?

The advantage of steel is its ability to deform before failure and with the strong structure behind the hull plating it would take one heck of a collision to hole the boat. One DD 462 sat on a reef for weeks before it was refloated, one hit an ice berg, and one hit a rock on a flood tide at 13ish knots. None of these boats had hull damage. The one that hit a rock did have rudder damage when it slid/bounced of the rock and the stern hit another rock. One boat at the SHM yard was hit by a ship that broke loose from the neighboring ship yard during a storm. The DD had its paint scratched and you can't tell there was a collision.

So given the above, do you really need the ER/galley water tight door and bulkhead? Only two owners think so.

Later,
Dan
Go hydraulic and install a big ass Pacer Pump just for the warm fuzzy of knowing you can pump 300 gal a minute out if need be.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 11:27 AM   #36
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
Not being familiar with steel boat construction methods, a question please. Do steel boats have longitudinal stringers for reinforcement? I know there is a strong keel. Just wondering if the stringers die before the bow section, or there are none. Probably would be necessary for the engine bed.
The should, especially in the bow. Steel is plastic, so over time it will stretch a bit and you can get that starved horse look. A horizontally situated 6" x 2" I-beam runs from about 16' aft of the bow on Delfin about 2' above the waterline for that purpose.

In the ER, the longitudinal stiffening for the engine is pretty significant.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Inside bow.jpg
Views:	125
Size:	70.8 KB
ID:	34798   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1010048.jpg
Views:	115
Size:	71.4 KB
ID:	34799  
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 08:34 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
City: Hong Kong
Country: Hong Kong
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 210
As Delfin says, the horizontal stringers are required.

On the Ducks, these stringers go all the way to the bow so they are very strongly built.

About the coating and the steel preparation: it must be treated as one system, it doesn't matter how thick the final dry film thickness (DFT) is if the steel or coating layers hasn't been prepared correctly from the beginning.

All coats has an application time window where the different layers of coat will chemically bond and create 1 thick layer. If this time window has expired then the coat must be sanded (mechanical bonding) to ensure that there is bonding between the layers. Chemical bonding is better than mechanical bonding.

So even if the steel preparation is first class and the first primer layer is ok, then you are not home safe because the correct bond has to be established before the next primer layer, other coat or fairing compound is applied.

Even fairing compounds has an application window...

It's up to the buyer to either trust the yard or hire a surveyor - this applies to yards all over the world.
Searios is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 11:28 AM   #38
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Searios View Post
As Delfin says, the horizontal stringers are required.

On the Ducks, these stringers go all the way to the bow so they are very strongly built.

About the coating and the steel preparation: it must be treated as one system, it doesn't matter how thick the final dry film thickness (DFT) is if the steel or coating layers hasn't been prepared correctly from the beginning.

All coats has an application time window where the different layers of coat will chemically bond and create 1 thick layer. If this time window has expired then the coat must be sanded (mechanical bonding) to ensure that there is bonding between the layers. Chemical bonding is better than mechanical bonding.

So even if the steel preparation is first class and the first primer layer is ok, then you are not home safe because the correct bond has to be established before the next primer layer, other coat or fairing compound is applied.

Even fairing compounds has an application window...

It's up to the buyer to either trust the yard or hire a surveyor - this applies to yards all over the world.
By way of proving your point, I spoke to Townsend Bay boat yard who re-painted a large steel yacht. The paint manufacturer sent a representative to the yard to monitor exactly what you are referring to - preparation, but as importantly temperature and time between re-coating. It is quite the orchestrated event to do it right, which would be one of the things in a foreign boat yard I would want to watch pretty closely, even paying a rep from the paint manufacturer to hang out for the 3 or 4 days required.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 01:23 PM   #39
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
The paint manufacturer sent a representative to the yard to monitor exactly what you are referring to - preparation, but as importantly temperature and time between re-coating.

The paint manufacturers will be more motivated to do this going forward. The large yacht "A" making the PNW tour lately had or has a lawsuit against the paint suppliers that was in the neighborhood of $100 million.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 05:50 PM   #40
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPseudonym View Post
The paint manufacturers will be more motivated to do this going forward. The large yacht "A" making the PNW tour lately had or has a lawsuit against the paint suppliers that was in the neighborhood of $100 million.
No doubt true. I think the yard told me the job was a re-paint under warranty and the manufacturer wanted to ensure it was done right this time.
__________________

__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012