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Old 03-03-2018, 02:30 PM   #41
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I replaced all my cleats with 10" stainless last year too. I filled the old holes with thickened epoxy and made new backing plates. I was able to access the back sides with some boat yoga and use of universal sockets on an extension. Getting this done required help from my Admiral but we now have a nice improvement. A couple of my old cleats which were hollow cast aluminum were so corroded they were easily broken off. I only had 2 that were in reasonable shape.

Kevin
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:12 AM   #42
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The gunwale painting is complete. It took a lot longer to complete than anticipated due to me applying the wrong primer. The primer was so soft that I had to wet sand it all off which took over a week. Anyway, the paint is on and compared to what it looked like when I got the boat it looks amazing. I used 3 coats of Quantum 99 two part polyurethane paint applied with a roller and no tipping. No, it is not perfect like a professionally applied paint sprayed on, but for a DIY job it is magic and very easy to apply. I was very disappointed in the drying time. Quantum said that the paint had to be dry to the touch before the paint could be recoated. They also said that it should take 3 to 4 hours for the paint to be dry and that if subsequent coats weren't applied within 12 hours the paint had to be abraded. It took almost 8 hours for the paint to dry so there is no way I could get all 3 coats on in one day. Two of my friends came over and help me with the abrading so we made quick work of it.

Other than using the correct primer the only thing I would have done differently is to have another person precede me with a tack rag. I ran a tack rag over the area and by the time I finished wiping and started painting the Florida breeze had liberally coated the horizontal areas with grit. I got most of it off, but with ~ 90 second wet-edge time a considerable amount of grit got rolled into the finish. But, it's not noticeable unless you rub your hand over it.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:33 PM   #43
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From what I can see in the photo, it looks great. I don't know how the before and after photos compare, but they are usually a good sign of satisfactory accomplishment.
My Prairie 36 has spider cracks in the gel coat all over the top sides. The hull is fine, but they must have done something wrong when they sprayed the gel coat in the molds for the deck and fly bridge.
I wish that I had your patience and effort to do what you're doing. I'm sure when you're done you'll look back and say that you're happy with the time, money, and effort you spent.
While I'll get up with my morning coffee, sit down on the fly bridge looking at the numerous cracks and say to myself, "I wish I had Bob's boat."
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:54 PM   #44
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Looks nice, very nice. I too am using Quantum paint on my boat. We rolled the flybridge and cabin sides last year. We are working on the hull this year. I am currently grinding out the cracks in the hull. Apparently the PO was a charter member of the coalition of the docking impaired... I am going to fiberglass the areas, sand and roll prime the hull. Then we are going to spray the hull. We have a painter that will come and spray it after I prep and tape everything. Should cost less than $600 to get it sprayed plus cost ot the paint.

As to the Prarie that had stress cracks on the deck, we did also. Many, many stress cracks through the entire deck. I looks like they put the gel coat on too thick. I sanded off the nonskid and painted the deck with Kiwigrip. It covered the fine stress cracks very nicely. We did not grind them out and fill them, there was just too many to deal with. So far it has been a year and we are very happy with the Kiwigrip.

Good luck with your project, looks good so far.
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Old 03-13-2018, 04:50 PM   #45
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Thanks for the kind words FOG and Comodave. The next project has started which is replacing all the large portlights. A friend came over today and help me take all six out and it was a battle. It was obvious that the installed portlights were either removed, resealed, and replaced or replaced with new portlight sometime between 1979 and now. Most of the ones we removed weren't actually screwed in to anything solid, but were glued in with 5200. Removing them caused some damage to the interior fiberglass, but nothing that will take long to repair. I am sourcing some teak strips to place between the inner and outer fiberglass layers and with a little mat, resin, and elbow grease the job should look pretty good. Painting the aft cabin was on the list so I'm moving it up to next on the list.

I still don't have all the deck hardware back on the boat so I'd better get hopping.


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Old 03-13-2018, 06:26 PM   #46
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I would not be concerned about using teak between the inner and outer layer of fiberglass. If it is never going to be exposed and all you are looking for is a filler, then I would go with something cheaper and easier to work with than teak. Also I would encapsulate the wood with epoxy as it goes in and it should last a really long time. The epoxy will also stick better to other wood than teak since teak has so much oil in it. If you do decide to go with teak, make sure to wipe it down with acetone righr before you glass it in. Good luck, I know how much work it is to replace portholes.
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Old 03-13-2018, 07:31 PM   #47
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Thanks Comodave. I'm good with cheaper and better. I'll take your advice.
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:11 AM   #48
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The aft cabin portlight project is complete and what a pain it was. At some point in the past the portlights had been changed from the original and what a hack job it was. The new ones were installed with 5200 and to get them out I had to do a lot of destruction. I had considered New Found Metals portlights but thanks to members of this forum I was able to find the plastic Gray Marine lights by Pompanette. Not as pretty as the stainless, but a whole bunch cheaper. I did not buy them directly from Pompanette, but found them much less expensive at go2marine.
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Old 04-01-2018, 01:15 PM   #49
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Glad it worked out for you. One of my old portholes in the aft head took the formica surface with it when I removed the porthole. I had to rebuild the entire cabinet around the porthole to replace the laminate.
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Old 05-03-2018, 07:34 PM   #50
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Leaking Hatches

I have a leak in my forward hatch. It looked like it had been previously repaired as there was black silicone sealant that had squirted out from behind the frame and it looked terrible. When I pushed on the lens it popped right out as the silicone sealant didn't stick to the lens. I removed all the sealant. Not an easy job as there are many rivet heads that were in the way. I am just guessing here, but I think the way the lens was secured and sealed when new was with a rubber gasket that both sealed and retained the lens. That rubber gasket is still there and still sort of holds the lens in place, but not secure enough and it certainly isn't waterproof.

I think I can make a satisfactory repair by gluing the lens in place, but I have no idea what to use. Thanks for any help.
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Old 05-03-2018, 10:06 PM   #51
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Both of my hatches leaked between the lens and frame on our Prairie 36. I dug out the bedding, removed the lens and cleaned everything with acetone. Then used Dow Corning 795 black to bed and seal the lens into the frame. Itís been about a 18 months and no leaks.
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Old 05-04-2018, 11:29 AM   #52
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Thanks FOG. I'll pick some up today.
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