Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-16-2012, 04:00 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
Buying a Pacific Trawler

Recently, I've had a couple of inquiries about possible purchases of Pacific Trawlers, and wanted to share my responses with others who may also be thinking about a purchase.

The following inquiry asked for*comparison with specific full displacement boats:

The Pacific Trawler is a different kind of boat than the full displacement Willard and Krogen models you mentioned. While I don't have any time on a Krogen 42, I have been onboard a friends Willard 30 some years ago out of Edmonds. The semi-displacement/hard chine Pacific Trawler will almost always roll less, the hard chines act as stabilizers especially if you are able to keep your speed up. If you are unable to keep your speed up, it acts very much like a displacement boat. Very sloppy in 5-6 foot waves.
From my perspective and experience (55 years of boating), I view displacement boats like the Willard and Krogen as more desirable boats to have during rough conditions, although the Willard is physically small so there is not that much of an advantage. One of the main differences in rough conditions, is where there is a following sea. The Pacific Trawler has a square stern, and a somewhat small rudder, and not suprisingly, is harder to control in this condition. All square stern boats tend to suffer from the same problem.
*
Having said this, there have been transits of these boats along the West and East Coasts. One boat based in California used to come north to Puget Sound, British Columbia and SE Alaska every other year. They subsequently took the boat to the East Coast via Panama, and are currently in the Bahamas. They have equipped their boat with active stabilizers, and are the clear exception to ocean cruising.
*
The answer (at least for us) is to only cruise when conditions are expected to make boating enjoyable, this means max 4 footers, although we have frequently waited for better conditions (We try to cruise without a schedule). In our trips to SE Alaska, we make sure conditions are good before crossing open ocean waters. By minimizing exposure to rough sea conditions, the positive attributes of the Pacific Trawler become very attractive.
*
The features that we consider important: Ability to safely single handle, no side decks which provides an enlarged saloon, good comfort for 2 crew (only occasional guests, and they need to be good shipmates), good storage for fuel/water/provisions (we can easily go 10-14 days before a marina/store), relatively easy engine and systems maintenance access, a tender storage on the boat deck, and minimal stairs (we don't have a fly bridge). Also, we typically boat through the winter in Puget Sound and southern B.C., so a good heating system is critical.
*
One telling observation about Pacific Trawlers compared with the Willard 30 and Krogen 42: I know of only the one Pacific Trawler that has active stabilizers, there is an additional boat that had passive stabilizers a number of years ago for an owner who used it to fish off the W Coast of Vancouver I. I have seen a couple of passive stabilized Willard 30's, but almost all Krogen 42's have active or passive stabilization.
*
The following inquiry from sailboaters asked for*general information about a used Pacific Trawler:
*

I've noticed that a large number of Pacific Trawler owners have come from sailing vessels.* The best information I can give to answer your questions is to just give you my impressions as a 14-year Pacific Trawler owner.
*
Some quick history:* About 20 boats were produced in the mid-1970's in California, then about 35 boats were produced in Washington State from 1997 to 2003.* The PT 40 came from the Washington production, they simply added 3 more feet to the existing 37 foot mold.* A semi-production boat, new owners had a range of options in interior layout and equipment.* One thing that characterized the Washington boats, is that the interior design was by Lynn Seynour of Nordic Tug, so there is a similarity of interior space with* Nordic Tugs.
*
About half of the Washington boats have a fly bridge, all are single engine diesel with a bow thruster.* Close quarters boat handling is excellent with this package.* The Washington boats also had wedges installed at the transom to mimic the effect of trim tabs, so that with enough power, the boat can plane.* As with any semi-displacement planing boat, fuel consumption is high when planing (around 12 gph at 12 knots requiring* a 300+HP engine).* Almost every owner I know tends to cruise at 8 knots or below, which provides around 2-3 miles per gallon.* Range at 7.5 knots is around 1000 miles.
*
I believe that the vessel offers a good set of compromises for inland/coastal cruising.* It is not meant for ocean cruising with it's square stern, but this gives it the interior room of a longer vessel.**
*
The features that we consider important:* Ability to safely single handle, no side decks which provides an enlarged saloon, good comfort for 2 crew (only occasional guests, and they need to be good shipmates), good storage for fuel/water/provisions (we can easily go 10-14 days before a marina/store), relatively easy engine and systems maintenance access, a tender storage on the boat deck, and minimal stairs (we don't have a fly bridge).
*
We don't go out in rough water, but the boat serves well if we get caught.* Any steep waves 5 foot and over can be uncomfortable.* During our trips from Seattle to SE Alaska, there are about 5 large water crossings, and we've been known to occasionally wait for better conditions (our type of boating is meant to be enjoyable!).

We typically boat through the winter in Puget Sound and southern B.C., a good heating system is critical.
*
As with any used boat, a good survey will hopefully expose how well the boat has been used and maintained.* We average around 300 engine hours/year and have over 5400 hours on the engine.* Don't be concerned with looking at at boat with high engine hours, we expect our engine to go 12-15000 hours before it needs major servicing.* Good maintenance is a much larger factor with respect to reliability.
__________________
Advertisement

Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2013, 09:43 AM   #2
Newbie
 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1
Pacific Trawler

Jay,

There is so little information on this boat available on the web. Can you share with us any information you have or can link to that document the build methods for the hull specifically the use of wood as core material anywhere on the boat? I'm intrested in the older models built in California.

-Robert
__________________

Slice13551 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2013, 10:46 AM   #3
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
Jay N,
Very good summary and I like the PT a lot and agree w you fully about the side decks. We have a W30 Nomad w the sinful side decks and wish we had the wide body Voyager.

I really like the PT boat but not the very straight and quite flat bottom. The stern wedges you mention are for very fast boats and are a negative on any trawler that I can think of. Just extra drag and could push the bow into the next wave on following seas (subject to trim weight) specifically large ones. If the PT had considerable rocker making it closer to a displacement hull then I'd REALLY want one.

Only other criticism of the PT that I can think of is that w the wheelhouse that far fwd it very likely would be wet and have excessive heaving and acceleration/deceleration in head seas. But if I were shopping I'd be telling myself that those conditions, however not rare do apply to a fairly small amount of time underway in the PNW. Most of the time one would be enjoying the very large and friendly spaces that configuration deliver.

But for the service you describe the PT looks like a great boat to have and spend time on.

My favorite boat (NT32) is also a Lynn Seynour design as and most everything I've said about the PT applies to as well.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2013, 11:25 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
"There is so little information on this boat available on the web. Can you share with us any information you have or can link to that document the build methods for the hull specifically the use of wood as core material anywhere on the boat? I'm intrested in the older models built in California.

-Robert"

Hi Robert,

Unfortunately, there are not any readily available documentation on the specific construction methods used in the older California boats. Maybe other owners of these vessels would be able to tell you more about it.

The only things that I can offer are somewhat speculative: A number of the California boats were constructed with fiberglass liners that encapsulated the fuel and water tankage; and I am led to understand that all of the California boats have hulls with end-grain balsa coring between fiberglass layers, along with most of the house and decks.

Stringers and tank supports in WESTERLY (California 1974) are encapsulated wood (no fiberglass liner), but I don't know about the wood itself. Bulkheads are plywood.

As with all cored boats, the integrity of hardware that penetrates the core is the most important factor. Based on my experience of 16 years with this boat, I found a wet hull core surrounding a improperly sealed thru-hull, and this was immediately repaired. Less important are a few improperly sealed deck fittings where there are only very small wet areas. But all of the areas need attention and eventual repair. All of the deck hardware has been removed and re-bedded. Feels a little like taking care of a wood boat, which we did for the previous 24 years before this boat.

The best answer to these questions in general, of course, is to get a good survey regardless of how any boat is constructed. Good maintenance practices always seem to win out at the end of the day.
Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2013, 11:49 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
Eric says: "I really like the PT boat but not the very straight and quite flat bottom. The stern wedges you mention are for very fast boats and are a negative on any trawler that I can think of. Just extra drag and could push the bow into the next wave on following seas (subject to trim weight) specifically large ones."

Agree with you about the built-in wedges. Pushing these hulls above S/L 1.2 (about 7.1 kts) can get ugly on the fuel consumption side. But some owners want to cruise at 8 kts or more, so if you're a boat builder, what can you do? Put in the wedges and 300+HP, and sell them the boat.

Eric says: "Only other criticism of the PT that I can think of is that w the wheelhouse that far fwd it very likely would be wet and have excessive heaving and acceleration/deceleration in head seas. But if I were shopping I'd be telling myself that those conditions, however not rare do apply to a fairly small amount of time underway in the PNW. Most of the time one would be enjoying the very large and friendly spaces that configuration deliver."

Of course, this is one of the common boating compromises. But what I've found with this boat, is that the bow flare keeps the windows fairly dry, certainly drier than a GB36/42. The downside of this aspect, is, as you point out, deceleration in head seas. The plus side of having the pilothouse closer to the bow, is that the operator tends to want to slow down early to gain comfort in short/steep head seas. This is not a boat where driving through those kind of conditions is acceptable. As with many boats of similar design and weight, this is just not comfortable and it is probably unsafe at some level.

Eric says: "But for the service you describe the PT looks like a great boat to have and spend time on."

Good set of compromises for Puget Sound/British Columbia/SE Alaska cruising.
Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 12:16 PM   #6
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
Agree Agree Jay,
It's like the rolling of the rounded bottom FD boat. You pay your dues and you get your advantages. The name of the game is NAME YOUR ADVANTAGES.

There's a number of trawlers I'd like to have if they had rocker. Ideally enough so their bottoms curved up to within an inch of the WL on the transom. Of course they would be full displacement hulls then and be limited to a bit less than a knot below hull speed and burn half as much fuel.

Do you know Randy Kerr? We bought Willy from him while she was moored at Edmonds. This pic is as she was the first day we saw her.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	willard 014 copy 2.jpg
Views:	291
Size:	173.5 KB
ID:	19229  
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 11:03 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
Eric says: "Do you know Randy Kerr? We bought Willy from him while she was moored at Edmonds. This pic is as she was the first day we saw her."

Didn't know Randy, but I remember seeing the boat from time-to-time. There was another sister-hull in Edmonds, can't remember the name, but owned by Don Austin for many years.
Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2013, 01:57 AM   #8
Newbie
 
City: Marysville
Country: US
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 4
Looking for newer Pacific Trawler

Jay - I joined about a year ago when I said I was interested in buying another one (owned hull # 47) in next few months. Actually would like a 2002 or 2003 if one becomes available. Only see a 2000 available now at Waterline but their screwed up 'Boatshed" system will not let you look at the pictures without signing an onerous agreement.

Know of anyone that may be interested in selling one anywhere in US? I live in Seattle area but did the Great Loop in my new 2001 PT 11 years ago and did ship it over the road after removing flybridge.

Thanks
Captain T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2013, 08:12 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
Hi Gerry

"Jay - I joined about a year ago when I said I was interested in buying another one (owned hull # 47) in next few months. Actually would like a 2002 or 2003 if one becomes available. Only see a 2000 available now at Waterline but their screwed up 'Boatshed" system will not let you look at the pictures without signing an onerous agreement."

Try the listing on Yacht World, then click on details next to the price. You should be able to see the pics.

Know of anyone that may be interested in selling one anywhere in US? I live in Seattle area but did the Great Loop in my new 2001 PT 11 years ago and did ship it over the road after removing flybridge.

Don't know of any newer boats for sale at this time, but I'm not really in that loop. Good Luck. Jay
Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2014, 01:11 PM   #10
Member
 
City: Puyallup, wa
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Point Andreas
Vessel Model: Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 15
37Pacific

Good article. Myself and a close friend recently purchased a 1977 37 ' Pacific Trawler. we love it. brought it back down from Juneau last November. Our plan is to cruise SE Alaska each summer. heading north in late May 2014. name of the boat is Pt Andreas. will you be cruising north this summer?
37Pacific is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2014, 04:24 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
Congrats new PT ANDREAS owner!. Great to hear that the boat will be used. Where is she moored?

If you don't mind sending me your name/contact info to my email address: cjnmaritime@gmail.com, I'll send you back the latest owners list.

WESTERLY is planning to depart Edmonds in early May for SE, planning on picking up family/guests in Ketchikan around June 18.

Hope to see you out there.

Here's a pic of PT ANDREAS in Lynn Canal July 2012.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1284LynnCanalPtAndreas.jpg
Views:	199
Size:	96.8 KB
ID:	29013  
Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2014, 09:10 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Rebel112r's Avatar
 
City: Birch bay wa
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Rogue
Vessel Model: North Pacific 42
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 391
Capt T. Boatshed seems Ok to me. They want a little info, but they dont pester you. They do take a lot of pics.
Rebel112r is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 11:56 PM   #13
Al
Guru
 
Al's Avatar
 
City: ketchikan, Alaska
Country: usa
Vessel Name: 'SLO'~BELLE
Vessel Model: 1978 Marben-27' Flybridge Trawler Pilothouse Pocket Cruiser[
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,690
Dark Green hulled PT passed our home at Pond Reef heading North. Wished her safe travels as she scooted by.

Al Ketchikan (Bridge to Nowhere) Alaska
Al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 12:50 AM   #14
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al View Post
Dark Green hulled PT passed our home at Pond Reef heading North. Wished her safe travels as she scooted by.
Green hulls rock.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2014, 12:34 AM   #15
Member
 
City: Puyallup, wa
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Point Andreas
Vessel Model: Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 15
May be looking to sell PT 37

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay N View Post
Congrats new PT ANDREAS owner!. Great to hear that the boat will be used. Where is she moored?

If you don't mind sending me your name/contact info to my email address: cjnmaritime@gmail.com, I'll send you back the latest owners list.

WESTERLY is planning to depart Edmonds in early May for SE, planning on picking up family/guests in Ketchikan around June 18.

Hope to see you out there.

Here's a pic of PT ANDREAS in Lynn Canal July 2012.
Hi, Jay. Sorry that we could not meet up this past summer. I was able to spend over7 weeks in SE Alaska this past summer. I wasvery impressed with the bear viewing at Anan, Margaret and Pack Creek. we are trying to decided whether we can keep the boat. we may need to sell it. finding comps is difficult. any suggestions? anyone interested in a possible purchase can contact me at ken.corkum@yahoo.com I will set up a time to come up and see your boat.
37Pacific is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2014, 04:31 PM   #16
Veteran Member
 
Sharkey's Avatar
 
City: Snead Island, Fla.
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 44
I'm still interested in a 40 that might come for sale on the U.S. East coast..... Everybody keep me in mind....

Sharkey
__________________
I didn't say it was your fault, I just said I was blaming you.
Sharkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2014, 08:08 PM   #17
Guru
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,291
[QUOTE=manyboats;155689]Jay N,
Very good summary and I like the PT a lot and agree w you fully about the side decks. We have a W30 Nomad w the sinful side decks and wish we had the wide body Voyager.

Side decks are a bit like fly bridges there are those who love them and those that do not. I personally can not see a boat for me without wide side decks. I want to be able to walk around and deal with dock lines-picking up a mooring from stern and walking it forward-walking my dinghy around and just generally having full access to the whole boat. Now I do a lot of single handing and perhaps if you have bow and stern crew some but not all of the issues above can be dealt with. Side decks are usually sacrificed when internal accommodation is weighted above boat function pushing the boat closer to the cottage on the water. A review of the boats on the water will attest to the fact that a lot of people want the cottage on the water or something in-between that is still a capable traveler.
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2014, 11:37 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Jay N's Avatar
 
City: Edmonds, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: WESTERLY
Vessel Model: 1974 Pacific Trawler 37
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 387
Hi Eyschulman.

Sorry I didn't see your post until now.

"Side decks are a bit like fly bridges there are those who love them and those that do not. I personally can not see a boat for me without wide side decks. I want to be able to walk around and deal with dock lines-picking up a mooring from stern and walking it forward-walking my dinghy around and just generally having full access to the whole boat. Now I do a lot of single handing and perhaps if you have bow and stern crew some but not all of the issues above can be dealt with."

For the way we use the boat, side decks would have limited utility. We wouldn't want to give up any interior space for them, we would simply have to have a larger boat in order to have an equivalent living area.

The things you mention above are certainly factors to support the idea of having side decks. But in not having side decks, we have different methods of accomplishing the same things, even when single handling the boat.

With respect to dealing with dock lines, the bow and springs are accessible from the pilothouse deck, and walking through the cabin allows access to the stern line. When we dock, either the shoulder comes in alongside first (plan A), or the stern is maneuvered to come in first. After either end of the boat is made fast, the boat can be further maneuvered (if needed). When we un-dock, either one end or the other is let-go first depending on conditions.

We have always been able to pick up a mooring from the bow. But if I had to pick up at the stern, I would lead a line along the 6" side deck from the bow to the stern. This line can be placed on the side deck by climbing to the boat deck and walking the line along. This same access allows walking the dinghy around the boat.

So, in a way, we have full access to the boat. Truly the biggest challenge of NOT having side decks, is scrubbing the windows. While it is easy to rinse them, sometimes they need a good scrubbing to get the salt off. This challenge is mitigated by alternating side-to at docks.

"Side decks are usually sacrificed when internal accommodation is weighted above boat function pushing the boat closer to the cottage on the water." Yes! But this boat cottage still functions very well.

"A review of the boats on the water will attest to the fact that a lot of people want the cottage on the water or something in-between that is still a capable traveler." If we ever could have our choice of a boat designed for beauty in all aspects of hull shape, propulsion, accommodation and cruising duration, I'm thinking we would have a long and narrow hull, probably built out of wood.
__________________

Jay N is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pacific Trawler Owners Information Jay N Pacific Trawler 57 06-01-2017 02:04 PM
buying a trawler edbulmer General Discussion 51 06-01-2015 10:33 AM
2011 Pacific Trawler Rendezvous Jay N Pacific Trawler 6 06-14-2011 08:54 PM
Buying our first trawler jtflyn Power Systems 37 11-03-2010 07:34 AM
Buying a used trawler Dimview Power Systems 14 09-13-2010 04:39 PM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012