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Old 02-09-2018, 10:17 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
Bus bars! Every time i wire in something new, bus bars. Eliminates those "previous owner" wire octopuses and makes it much easier for trouble-shooting. Always buy a bigger one than you think you'll need (more terminals) as other wires mysteriously migrate there too. You actually save money on crimps and crap that you will cut out again cause you got it wrong, plus you can trash that roll of electrical tape.


Excellent suggestion.
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:56 AM   #102
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Gorilla glue can be used as a temp fix to rotted decks. Cures very hard and water actually helps it expand. Simply drill a few holes, inject, plug holes as they fill and watch the water get displaced(one of mine actually squirted a few feet).

Tile clad 2 part epoxy paint makes a great bilge/indoor paint and an awesome outdoor primer(not UV stable, painted decks last about 4 years though). 2 gallons for $100 and dries hard as nails(slippery as hell on decks must use "grit")

learn to solder. It's crazy easy and allows you to cut/fix those cables with 9 small wires inside. I've even repaired an autopilot computer. Solder and heatshrink will always outlast a connector in saltwater.

Barkeepers friend is an awesome cleaner(comes like comet) that will remove rust stains and bleach teak.

Learn to sew/buy a sewing machine. I can't count how many times I've needed one from a bimini top repair to odd sized window treatments.

Dry erase board on board :-). For those of use with ADD it really helps keep track of maintenance needed, shopping, etc. Seems obvious but took me awhile to get one.


Its almost always cheaper to try to fix something, fail in the middle of it and call in a pro than to just call in the pro. Plus you'll rarely get stumped. "Its just nuts and bolts!"
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Old 02-12-2018, 09:24 AM   #103
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Buy the owner and service/maintenance manuals for your engine.
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Old 02-13-2018, 07:40 AM   #104
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Many of us have faced the dreaded delaminated teak veneer problem and here is a hint that has served me well on several occasions. The technique I have successfully used to force glue back into the deepest part of the separation is by use of a plastic straw. First, I place a small wedge in the separation to open up the delaminated area as much as I can without doing further damage (a screwdriver works well here). Next I use a plastic straw, and just as if I were sucking up a milkshake I vacuum up exterior grade wood glue into the straw with my mouth. I then fold over the straw and with my fingers tightly hold the end which had not been dipped into the glue and this allows me to capture and contain the glue as I insert the straw into the lamented wood opening.
Being thin and flexible plastic the straw will flatten out and allow you to shove it all the way into the deepest recesses of the delaminated section. I drive the glue out of the straw by securely holding the crimped end against the surface of the wood and I then run a thumb or other squeegee tool along the straw’s length starting at the crimped end, thus forcing the glue out of the straw and into the wedged opening.
I sometimes repeat this process several times in order to load the area with glue, and once the glue is in place I gently thump the top surface of the delaminated veneer with a small mallet to spread the glue around. Finally, I clamp the area either with some weights or other pressure devices, or maybe drive in some very small finish brads which can later be nailset and wax penned over to cover the nail hole.
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Old 02-13-2018, 09:14 AM   #105
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Seabum, great tip, thanks! And costs less than those plastic syringes I use for repair. I can save those for other fixit situations.
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:47 PM   #106
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It would fun and educational to compile a list of everyones best ideas for making boat maintenance easier for the do it yourself folks (other than pulling out the checkbook and paying someone else to do it).



I'll start it off with installing a 12 volt oil change pump connected directly to the pan. No more pumping it out through the dipstick pipe.


Excellent start sir
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Old 02-14-2018, 12:19 AM   #107
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You probably all know this one but I will mention it just the same.
If you need to undo anything tubular like an oil filter, just get a length of cord or light rope. Put a loop in one end. Wrap the cord around the object a few times and put the end of the screwdriver through the loop to act as a lever.
As you lever with the screwdriver, put some tension on the tail of the cord.
Quite versatile, even undid a hex pipe fitting the other day when caught without the multis.
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Old 02-14-2018, 12:40 AM   #108
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If you need to undo anything tubular like an oil filter, just get a length of cord or light rope. Put a loop in one end. Wrap the cord around the object a few times and put the end of the screwdriver through the loop to act as a lever.
As you lever with the screwdriver, put some tension on the tail of the cord.
The crude version dispenses with the cord, just drive the screwdriver through the filter and turn the filter. (Note: method cannot be used to fit and tighten fresh filter.)
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:15 PM   #109
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Ok, remember "Wax On Wax Off" well with a big boat that means Lots and Lots of work, or money for someone to do the work.... Well the solution we like is PERMANON.

Follow the directions (once your boat has a shiny surface, buff of oxidation) and Permanon will preserve and protect the shine and dirt and water will be deflected like Rainx on glass. And best of all you should spray it on all surfaces (fiberglass, glass, plastic, canvas, vinyl,etc.) It works great on nonskid too, and your boat will stay much cleaner and will clean-up with a strong stream of water! Just mist it on with a one liter pump-up sprayer (follow label directions) no buffing. Available on Amazon.

http://www.permanonfinishes.com/boat-yacht.htm
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:33 PM   #110
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Greetings,
Re: Post # 107. Sort of a poor man's strap wrench.

https://www.acklandsgrainger.com/en/...7IN/p/RDG31340
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Old 02-14-2018, 09:00 PM   #111
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Ok, remember "Wax On Wax Off" well with a big boat that means Lots and Lots of work, or money for someone to do the work.... Well the solution we like is PERMANON.

Follow the directions (once your boat has a shiny surface, buff of oxidation) and Permanon will preserve and protect the shine and dirt and water will be deflected like Rainx on glass. And best of all you should spray it on all surfaces (fiberglass, glass, plastic, canvas, vinyl,etc.) It works great on nonskid too, and your boat will stay much cleaner and will clean-up with a strong stream of water! Just mist it on with a one liter pump-up sprayer (follow label directions) no buffing. Available on Amazon.

Permanon Yacht Supershine Boat Paint or Gelcoat Finish Protection Boats, Yachts, Ships, Sailboats, Power Boats, Speed Boats, Surf Boards, Kayaks, Jet Ski, Personal Watercraft, Gel Coat
I seem to remember TomB had real problems with a paint treatment applied to a boat he bought. This may well be entirely different, perhaps he will contribute.
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Old 02-15-2018, 05:57 AM   #112
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"Bus bars! Every time i wire in something new, bus bars."

Even better is a fuse bank to handle extra wiring.

With easy to see blown fuses , trouble shooting is no trouble at all.
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