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Old 01-08-2014, 08:49 AM   #1
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Working with 2 part epoxy paint

I am making a mount for my chart-plotter that will tilt it 20 degrees to the right. The unit is located about 2 feet left of the steering wheel and by tilting it 20 degrees should make it easier to read.

I made the mount out of 1/2 " plywood. I want to apply a gloss finish so it looks like it's part of the boat and not just some add on project.

I am thinking of using a product like Interlux Perfection, a two part epoxy paint that results in a gloss finish. I don't know if this is the proper product to use on plywood and what preparation is needed to apply the epoxy.

Anybody have suggestions. I've looked for a You Tube video, but none seems to address applying epoxy paint over plywood.

Thanks guys.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:51 AM   #2
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If you merely apply one coat of Epoxy paint on the plywood, it is almost guaranteed to look like a plywood item you threw together over the weekend and failed to finish properly, Tim.

Your first objective should be to thouroughly close up the pores in the plywood, especially the end grain. This could be done with multiple coats of paint, sanding between coats after cure. However, a more practical approach might be to first coat the plywood with clear WEST System Epoxy. Being more viscous, it will fill the grain better, possibly with a single application. Then, after sanding smooth, apply one or two coats of your Epoxy paint, sanding lightly between coats. If your surfaces are faire, the item may very turn out to resemble something bought from Brooklyn Boat Yard.

Aside from the end grain, a single coat of paint applied to the flat surfaces of plywood usually turns out all "pimply" from dust and torn wood fibers.
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:23 AM   #3
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Moby Nick is correct. You need to fill the grain of the plywood first using primer or resin. Interlux Perfection will give you a beautiful high gloss finish, but it will show every imperfection under it. I'm painting a small fiberglass covered plywood boat with Perfection now. I wish I had spent more time priming and sanding before I started to apply paint. Perfection goes on thin and you'll need to apply several coats. It's easy to sand through so use fine grit paper to sand between coats. I used 400 grit prior to applying the final coat. By the way, Perfection is not an epoxy paint. It's a two part polyurethane. Epoxy makes a great primer but not so good a top coat. It's subject to UV degradation.
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Old 01-08-2014, 11:45 AM   #4
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I would first apply a thick epoxy clear coat, sand and prime, and when the plywood grain is full and smooth then the gloss coat. The single part Brightside will give you the same gloss finish. I gave up on 2 parts as the one part hold up just as well.
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Old 01-08-2014, 01:55 PM   #5
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Thanks guys for the info. I didn't know Epoxy had no UV protection or Perfection was a 2 part poly.

I have used Brightside on the top of my sundeck. I was not able to get the high gloss finish Interlux advertises, but since it can't be seen I was OK with it.

Since the cost of a 2 part poly and the cost of the epoxy prime coat is a bit expensive, especially for such a small project, I'm wondering if I can get a good high gloss look out of this project by sanding to a very fine grit, say 220, and then applying several coats (as needed) of a high gloss oil based paint.

I understand the importance of sealing the end grain and with enough sanding and enough paint I should be able to do this. Also an oil based high gloss paint is much easier to work with than the 2 part poly's.

What do you guys think.

As a secondary method perhaps sealing with a 2 part epoxy and painting with an oil based high gloss paint if I can't seal the plywood end grain with just paint and sanding.

As mentioned above I have used the one part poly paint and did not get good results.
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Old 01-08-2014, 02:17 PM   #6
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Awl Grip (and others) sell a high-build epoxy primer. Most likely 2 coats of this, ideally sprayed on, would prepare the surface best. After polishing with 600 grit to 2a mirror finish, spray (or brush) on urethane top coat (not epoxy). This will give you a "factory" finish. Typical oil based paint won't do as good a job. Go to NAPA and buy auto urethane paint - they sell much smaller quantities. If you don't have a spray gun, you can by throwaway jars with spray (Prevalier or similar?). Push comes to shove, auto spray paint will be OK.
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Old 01-08-2014, 03:39 PM   #7
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Reuben,
A quick google search did not turn up anything for Prevalier. However Rustoleum makes this product: High Performance - VK9300 System 2K Epoxy Primer
I wonder if I could get it thick enough with this product?

NAPA in our area only carries a spray on acrylic.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:41 PM   #8
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For what it's worth, we used PPG Omni MP170 Epoxy Primer when we painted Hobo last winter on metal, aluminum, fiberglass, plywood and aged teak. We then painted with AwlCraft 2000. The primer was sprayed on in most areas but we did roll a few with a 4' varnish roller. We did fill and sand using 3M Marine filler first.

Edit: After we sprayed the epoxy primer we filled any pin holes with 3M Acryl-White Putty before painting.

You can't tell if the material painted was fiberglass, wood or metal when we were all done.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:36 PM   #9
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A small throw-away sprayer available at most hardware stores, and marine stores are the Preval units.

I would not use plywood unless you encapsulate it with fiberglass epoxy such as West System. For the project you are looking to do, I would look to purchase a fiberglass panel or perhaps make one. I made a similar panel by mixing a quantify of epoxy and pouring it into a waxed cookie sheet. Once hardened, I would sand the panel to the finish I was looking for, and then spray the panel with 3-6 coats of AwlCraft2000, with 600-1000 grit sandpaper.
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Old 01-08-2014, 11:04 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timjet View Post
I am making a mount for my chart-plotter that will tilt it 20 degrees to the right. The unit is located about 2 feet left of the steering wheel and by tilting it 20 degrees should make it easier to read.

I made the mount out of 1/2 " plywood. I want to apply a gloss finish so it looks like it's part of the boat and not just some add on project.

I am thinking of using a product like Interlux Perfection, a two part epoxy paint that results in a gloss finish. I don't know if this is the proper product to use on plywood and what preparation is needed to apply the epoxy.

Anybody have suggestions. I've looked for a You Tube video, but none seems to address applying epoxy paint over plywood.

Thanks guys.
Tim, I love working with 2 part Awlgrip products, but to do what you want with LP you'll be into product costs for a very small project that will be significant. Were it me, I would trim your panel with teak or mahogany, then buy a single quart of Pettit Easy Poxy. It will fill the grain on the flat surface of the plywood, as long as you sand it flat after about 3 coats. Then apply a couple of finish coats with a foam roller, allowing enough thickness that it can 'settle' flat. The difference in gloss will be minimal. You didn't say whether this is inside or out, but I am assuming indoors. I don't have any experience with the Perfection product, just Awlgrip and water soluble System 3 LP.
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Old 01-09-2014, 12:07 AM   #11
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G10 Fiberglass Board#

Jamestown has G10 Fiberglass Board in 1/4 and 1/2 thickness. I am thinking this would be a better base to paint than plywood.
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Old 01-09-2014, 03:06 AM   #12
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Tim:
Just as important in getting the project to look like it came from the factory is to radius the corners to at least 1/2 inch. If your boat's moulded corners are 3/4 inch or bigger, you may be past the capabilities of your home router, but if you have the tools, go as big a radius as will match what the builder used. Then with the properly sealed and sanded undercoating, you will get the look you want.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:29 PM   #13
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Thanks guys for your help.

I finished the construction of the mount, see pix below.

I filled all the gaps with wood filler and I now plan on using West Marine (not West System) Polyester Boaters Resin to fill all the wood fibers and get a smooth finish. I'm not sure this is the right product and it is cheap relatively speaking. I plan on brushing it on. The instructions say to allow to dry to a rubbery consistency then apply additional coats to avoid sanding between coats and get the build up (thickness) necessary.

Once that's done I think I may go to a auto body shop and see if they will spay on a poly or acrylic. I don't have the equip to spray.

What do you guys think.

I may have to wait a day or two for the temps to warm up, the epoxy needs at least 71 degrees.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:39 PM   #14
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it will work as I have done it that way...actualy to get a mirror surface...I waxed some glass or a mirror and on the last coat of polyester, painted it on extra thick and laid that face down on the waxed mirror...came off smooth as glass..

Then spray painted...just have had hit or miss luck with different spray paints..usually the primers though.....usually it would fail in a bubble up mode so scraping it off was easy....finally I just went straight to paint and avoided primers.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:13 PM   #15
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I was thinking of calling some auto body shops in the area and see if they will spay on either a acrylic or a poly. I think acrylic is used more in the auto industry.

My local NAPA store sells acrylic in spray cans so maybe I'll try that.

Any comments on acrylic vs poly.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:22 PM   #16
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Really not sure...lots of people say plain old rustoleum has held up for years on their deckhouses so whatever floats your boat.

My old boss had us use whatever was in the paint locker..one day on trucks, boats or oil cleanup equipment and the spray stuff seems to last.

Check some cans...might say right on it...."fiberglass" as well as a bunch of other things.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:33 PM   #17
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I think long term your seams between the plywood end grain and veneer face will crack and show. If this were my project I wood radius the outside corners and glass the box with thin glass cloth. I would also epoxy the interior of the box to completely seal the box. I would then prime and paint the exterior with Sterling poly. Sterling is easier to repair than Awlgrip. As mentioned using automotive acrylic is much less expensive and probably will hold up as well.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:41 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timjet View Post
I was thinking of calling some auto body shops in the area and see if they will spay on either a acrylic or a poly. I think acrylic is used more in the auto industry.

My local NAPA store sells acrylic in spray cans so maybe I'll try that.

Any comments on acrylic vs poly.
We painter Hobo with a 2 part acrylic urethane. You can spray multiple coats quickly and is easier to repair than a 2 part polyurethane. The acrylic is not as durable as the polyurethane but close.

When we were in Trinidad, PPG was well represented and their automotive paints were used routinely for spraying boats.
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Old 01-17-2014, 07:40 AM   #19
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West Marine sells a resin with a color agent in it. The same as regular resin but with color. Maybe that's an option.
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Old 01-17-2014, 07:59 AM   #20
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Greetings,
Mr. t. I agree with Mr. Scary. Lay down a thin layer of cloth. As he mentioned this should minimize or eliminate any cracking of the polyester at the joints. I would cloth both the inside and outside then have an auto shop spray a finish coat. What little fibreglassing I've done with this method has been pretty straightforward and easy. A colored resin IS indeed an option but so is a rattle can (rc) and touching up, if necessary in the future with a rc is cheap and easy. Just my $.02.
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