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Old 12-17-2014, 07:02 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by cappy208 View Post
I would recommend buying an antifreeze tester to make sure the fresh water radiators of the engine and Genset are at minus 20 or so. It doesn't matter if you flush the seawater side, if the interior loop isn't protected.

I have not found a tester to test the 'pink rv stuff' for freeze protection. It is not glycol based. BUT, it is really cheap. So, in My opinion, more is better. Err on the side of caution.

I use my pink stuff to flush the fresh water system. I catch ALL of it after I have blown the lines out with compressed air. Then I reuse the 'used' stuff as an initial flush for the AC system. Then flush the AC system with a gallon of new pink. I catch the last gallon of pink from the AC and use it in the generator. Then flush with another gallon in the Generator. Catch the last gallon and use it to flush the Engine. Then use 3 gallons to flush the engine until all the water coming out the exhaust is pink.

My sea strainers have removable lid. These are conveniently just oversized to use 12 wraps of electrical tape around the threads of the bottle, and a quick tip over and I can step on the bottle and give a 'power assist' to the pink stuff on its way.

BTW, The earlier question about 'sea chests' refers to a valve on the water intake hose. If you really don't have a valve on EACH and EVERY seawater intake hose (below the waterline) you should have them installed.

Speaking as an ex yachtyard worker, many (I mean MANY sinking, swamping, or near misses) are caused by below the waterline intakes that (even WITH valves) are not shut, when the boat is not in use. This is a FATAL mistake made by a majority of boat owners who routinely leave underwater valves open. This is not just a idle topic, but valves that are not used regularly often get seized up, and need large efforts (or shipyard haulhouts) to make them right (loosening up or replacing)

If you do have the valves installed, use them. Use them regularly. They make flushing easier, and allow you to use the valve to force the pink stuff in the right direction. The only thing to remember, is to open the valves once you are done, to let the water drain out, so nothing freezes in the valve. Just make sure you close them, so critters dont crawl in and make a nest. That's a 'itch' to clean out next spring.

Cappy,

I was thinking a sea chest was a single hull penetration that multiple systems fed off of. On my boat, each system that needs sea water has it's own thru-hull...each of which has its own valve. I am closing them as I winterize.

I'm confused by one thing you wrote. Are you saying they should be opened or closed for the winter?


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Old 12-17-2014, 04:41 PM   #22
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The valves should be opened, to drain out whatever is it that portion of the hose. Then, once drained, closed back up. The last couple feet of hose from the valve to the strainers are hard to get the sea water out. Usually there is a dip or a U in the hose. When putting the pink stuff into the strainer it is hard to get it to flow backwards to the throughull with certainty. By opening the valve (then shutting it for the winter) you ensure the bronze valve body is free of ANY possible unprotected water. I mention shutting them, because I have heard of several times that wasps or hornets made a mud nest inside the opening, and once launched that gets sucked into the hose fittings. A pain to have to pull apart every one until you find the culprit. Also, make sure you buy a small can of Lubriplate waterpump grease. Not only good for the impeller, but good to use to put some grease on the ball of the thruhulls from the outside. Also, lubriplate is just generally good to have aboard for general preventative use.
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Old 12-17-2014, 06:06 PM   #23
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Cappy - it sounds like you are talking about valves open if hauled for the winter. I think MikeM is wintering in the slip like we do, which means valves closed to keep the ocean out, not critters.
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Old 12-17-2014, 09:00 PM   #24
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Cappy - it sounds like you are talking about valves open if hauled for the winter. I think MikeM is wintering in the slip like we do, which means valves closed to keep the ocean out, not critters.

Yes you are right. Finished up tonight. The advice I got on this forum really helped. And I learned a lot in the process of doing it.


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Old 12-17-2014, 09:00 PM   #25
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Let's talk about seacocks and whether you should leave them open or closed after winterization. Both ball valve seacocks and tapered plug seacocks have a cavity that if left full of sea water could freeze and damage the valve.

So if the boat is on the hard- absolutely, positively, no question- leave all seacocks open so the cavity will drain and it won't freeze.

But if the boat is kept in the water, then it is a bit more problematical. You probably want to keep your seacocks closed, just as a good precaution against hoses popping off or whatever that might sink your boat if they are left open.

If you are in moderate climates where the water doesn't freeze around your boat or you have a bubbler that keeps it ice free, then you can probably close he seacock and not worry about the cavity freezing.

But if you are in harsher climates, say north of the Chesapeake, the water can freeze deeply- 6" or more, and even a bubbler won't keep it ice free in an extended power outage.

In this case, most ball and plug valves have a little 1/8" NPT plug that can be removed when the valve is closed to drain the cavity. Whether you leave the plug off or not during the winter is another question. Tapered plug valves particularly can leak and let sea water refill the cavity. So I would leave the plug off in that case. Ball valves with Teflon seats seal very well and if you know that your valve is in good shape and seals tight I would put the plug back in. But leaving it off until spring is safest.

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Old 12-18-2014, 10:14 AM   #26
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An additional note of caution...
Mainship had a technical bulletin affecting multiple models from 2002 - 2009
"SERVICE BULLETINLetters sent to owners 11/27/07 & 1/3/08: Mainship has made metallurgical analysis of Marine Hardware brand ball valves, which were installed by on their vessels between 2001 through 2007. Preliminary information is that corrosion may affect the stem or handle of the ball valve, which means that the handle may turn without actually opening and closing the ball valve as intended in the event of maintenance or an emergency."

I experienced a problem the first year winterizing my 2008 Mainship34 HT Trawler. The stop on one of the seacock valve handles had corroded and did not provide a positive stop at the correct ball position - the result was a slow weep of raw water into the ball cavity after draining via the valve drain plug. It was only after hauling and removing the valve that the problem was identified. At the time I was not aware of the bulletin or the BoatUS Consumer complaint database. The fix was an easy one - replace the handle but the lesson learned was to always confirm the ball cavity has been drained and to check the Boat US complaint database for potential problems.
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Old 12-18-2014, 09:50 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolena View Post
Cappy - it sounds like you are talking about valves open if hauled for the winter. I think MikeM is wintering in the slip like we do, which means valves closed to keep the ocean out, not critters.
Yes, I missed the wintering over part. I was responding as if this was hauled out on the hard for the winter. Sorry for the confusion.

Regarding the valves, look at the valve type. There are two (that I know of) that have an integral flush spigot (for lack of a better word) to hook a hose to to inject antifreeze into the hose right next to the valve. This was the entire hose is protected from freeze damage. The sea valve is left in the closed position. Hopefully you have one of the types that has a flush valve built in. I am contemplating swapping my sea valve for one of these next year. Here's one that can be installed immediately after the sea valve. http://www.westmarine.com/buy/groco-...4EZBoCxl_w_wcB
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