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Old 09-01-2015, 12:53 PM   #1
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wall covering

I have a typical 80's boat with some interior wood damage from window leaks. I have the leak fixed now, but I'm trying to decide what to do about the repair on the interior panels. I have the typical wood veneer walls. Was looking for suggestions on what to use for wall covering. Paint? Wood veneer? Or something else. Pictures would be appreciated. My boat is a 44 ' 3 cabin my
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Old 09-01-2015, 01:52 PM   #2
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Greetings,
Mr. 30. I would recommend veneer to maintain the appearance. When I look at boats on YW, interior shots that show non "standard" wall finishes raise a red flag in my eyes. Hmmmm.....Leaky windows is what immediately comes to mind. It may well be that the sources of the leaks have been repaired but just that one "flag" would preclude me from pursuing that particular vessel any farther.
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Old 09-01-2015, 02:01 PM   #3
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Yes leaky. windows. my windows are aluminum but it seems the factory Sealer had given up. they are re sealed now with No leaks but I will have to admit the whole boat with teak wood veneer seems kind of boring to me at this point. I do not know what the newer style boat used at this point, possibly the same things
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Old 09-01-2015, 02:36 PM   #4
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I don't have a solution, but I do have that exact same issue. I'd love to redo the veneer, but it will take a lot of nerve to peel that piece off and try to replace.

Perhaps someone has a link to a How-To page?
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Old 09-01-2015, 02:38 PM   #5
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The easiest to maintain (as the windows will leak again) is to paint the area below them.

Then install a few vertical cleats and secure 1/4 or 3/8 thick 1 1/2 wide wooden strips.

Use screws with finishing washers , so the new ceiling can be re varnished when required.

Looks nautical .Teak or Mahogany are OK but birch or ash will brighten a dark boat.
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Old 09-01-2015, 03:01 PM   #6
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There is a place in ft Lauderdale that has 101 different styles of Veneers, I guess I would have to take a sample to try and match. but I think I would still need someone to install it. I wonder who does that sort of work, can someone who does wallpaper installed veneer?
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Old 09-01-2015, 03:15 PM   #7
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I wonder who does that sort of work, can someone who does wallpaper installed veneer?
Not normally, no. If you're in Ft. Lauderdale I can give the name and number of a first rate ships carpenter who could do the job. Then you will need to find some one to apply the finish if you can't.
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Old 09-01-2015, 05:09 PM   #8
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Greetings,
Mr. c. No need to remove the old veneer. As long as the substrate (old veneer and underlaying wood) is solid, flat and dry, simply glue the new veneer over the old. You WILL end up, somewhere along the bulkhead, with a 1/16th" seam where the new overlaps the old.
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Old 09-01-2015, 06:12 PM   #9
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Not normally, no. If you're in Ft. Lauderdale I can give the name and number of a first rate ships carpenter who could do the job. Then you will need to find some one to apply the finish if you can't.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:32 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by motion30 View Post
I have a typical 80's boat with some interior wood damage from window leaks. I have the leak fixed now, but I'm trying to decide what to do about the repair on the interior panels. I have the typical wood veneer walls. Was looking for suggestions on what to use for wall covering. Paint? Wood veneer? Or something else. Pictures would be appreciated. My boat is a 44 ' 3 cabin my
I have been told that our wallcovering in a 1984 Marine Trader LaBelle is original. It is ugly gold high quality fabric. Underneath is ugly dark brown wood. HMMMM.

Any info on actual original wall covering in these Taiwan built boats? I'm really close to stripping the wallpaper and covering with commercial grade vinyl to make the space bright and cheerful.
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Old 05-16-2016, 12:48 PM   #11
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I've done a fair amount of veneer repair, re-veneering and veneering on boats and furniture. It's really not all that difficult to renew even badly delaminated panels. (Furniture is a different problem since the glues are most often not waterproof; it requires working over water-soluble glues with new water-containing glues - you're likely to damage the old bond adjacent to your new work.) I think that glues in marine plywood are likely to be urea-formaldehyde and while the stuff is pretty good, it gives up with repeated wetting/swelling and drying/shrinking of the veneers. You can glue to uncleaned surfaces of this glue with epoxy.

The face veneers are usually quite thin, and usually more rot-resistant than the core veneers. If the face veneer is intact but the core is rotten, you can remove the panel and repair from behind. If you're lucky, you can dribble epoxy into the delaminated edge and then clamp to a flat surface. You very gently cut rotten core veneers from behind and replace them. Work on a flat surface. Clamp your new work to that flat surface with a plastic no-stick sheet; epoxy will always find a way through the veneer. Then refinish the whole panel. Additionally, I coat the edges and the back of the panel with epoxy so that the inevitable next leak does no damage. See a bunch of pics in my album 'Repairing Veneer'.
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Old 05-16-2016, 02:07 PM   #12
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Take a look at this post re: interior panels
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