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Old 02-17-2013, 11:33 AM   #21
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Varnish them first. Then if you change your mind you can paint them over the varnish. If you change your mind again, you can strip off the paint and there will be the varnish. It will just be a refinishing job.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:38 AM   #22
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I realize it's a sin to paint teak, but I'm one who likes to USE my boat rather than spend my time refinishing teak or any other wood. Recognizing how difficult it would be to remove all traces of paint from those doors, and that all traces must be removed to have the teak look good, I'd vote for painting it with a quality white paint.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:41 AM   #23
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Varnish right now 3 or 4 coats of any old varnish.

This is a base that will accept a good hi fill marine primer , and a topcoat of any marine paint.

The NEXT OWNER may be a masochist and love sitting in the slip for all season "freshing" varnish.

In the Carib , A coat a month is std.

It will be easy to strip down to varnish , with no wood or detail loss,, for the next fellow that has Varnishing as his lifes work or hobby..
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:45 AM   #24
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Hah!
I guess it's how you define hard work. Our boat is under cover so has less exposure, even so with teak rails on the main deck, bridge and the seating trim it's three days every 1-2 years with Cetol marine gloss. Scuffed area's get a little 3-M pad treatment. It helps being under covered as applying in hot sun could lead to some bubbles. For us the results are well worth the effort.
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:44 PM   #25
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But more people see them at the dock than at sea.

Ever priced teak lumber? I didn't think so.

If you knew how much it cost you would understand why people say its a crime to paint it.
Depends on where you live. This past fall we bought 35' of clear teak, had it milled to 1/2" by 2" with a 1/2 round on one edge and then sanded for $55 US total. Cheaper and more rot resistant than clear pine.

If we had to maintain all the exterior teak with clear marine finishes we would never have time to cruise.
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Old 02-17-2013, 03:39 PM   #26
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Whether I paint or varnish I'm going to coat in West with special clear hardener but I have not heard of using Cetol instead of varnish for the top coats. Any problem getting the Cetol to adhere? How long ago did you do it? Did you put the Cetol first coat on before the epoxy was fully set?
DO, Cetol is nice, and it should adhere fine to a properly applied penetrating epoxy substrate, but it is no where near as pretty as a varnished surface, IMO. Paint teak? I believe that would be the recommendation of the person who restored the artwork, below.

If you want the perfect look, do a good job of sanding, or removing all the paint using chemical stripper or heat gun and a pull scraper. Sand well, apply thinned epoxy to saturate the wood, wet sand to smooth, slop on a few coats of Interprime sealer to fill the grain, quick sand flat, then apply about 8 coats of Flagship varnish. Don't bother sanding between all coats, just the 4th and 7th. This may sound like overkill, but when you have the piece off the boat and on the bench, the difference between 3 coats of Cetol and 8 coats of varnish is about an hour and a half extra work. The difference in appearance, however, is well worth the effort.

After applying the epoxy, wait at least 3 days before applying anything else - this is important.

Just one man's opinion.

The art restoration equivalent of painting teak:
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Old 02-17-2013, 03:44 PM   #27
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Unless you can get every speck of paint out of the wood grain I would recommend painting them. If you varnish over wood that has been painted and still has paint way down in the grain it will look really bad. Based on what I see in your photo I would paint them. I think you will be very disappointed if you varnish the door if the way it looks in the photo is as "stripped" as you can get it.
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Old 02-17-2013, 04:04 PM   #28
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Daddyo - One step I left out was to clean with TSP after all the scraping and sanding, prior to the epoxy. The Smith's epoxy went on with 24 hours between coats. It's a very thin two-part mixture, and really penetrates the wood. Provides a nice barrier coat to water intrusion. The Cetol then was applied, again with 24 hours between coats. Adhesion was fine, and each coat looked better than the last. We did it last summer, but haven't had the boat out in the elements yet. The Cetol will give a fine look, but not a mirror-finish like a varnish would. It's also easier to touch up, a quick sanding and then brush on the spot with more Cetol. I wanted nice, rich looking teak, but not a mirror finish I would be a slave to. I'm happy with it.
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Old 02-17-2013, 06:15 PM   #29
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Nothing looks worse than "almost there" when stripping/sanding previously painted brightwork. I know the costs involved but, I stand by my observations that almost good brightwork just plain sucks.
Sorry if I offended any yacht club commodores.
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Old 02-17-2013, 06:58 PM   #30
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Well it turns out I didn't have the choice. Some paint and discoloration was just too deep to get out So epoxy and paint it is. First coat of epoxy is on and yeah it looks like almost good brightwork.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:54 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daddyo View Post
Well it turns out I didn't have the choice. Some paint and discoloration was just too deep to get out So epoxy and paint it is. First coat of epoxy is on and yeah it looks like almost good brightwork.
Daddy's, if this is in time, you might still be able to cetol the cockpit door, as in my previous post. It will then look nearly as good as varnish, but it is more forgiving of imperfect paint removal....and, as others mentioned, a helluva lot more forgiving when it comes to re-coating. Just a thought. If it sucks, then not hard to paint over like the pilot doors, but I think you might enjoy one "almost varnished" door..?
I know I do.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:55 PM   #32
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.. turns out I didn't have the choice. Some paint and discoloration was just too deep to get out...
I would have liked to take my painted transom back to teak, but knew it would not be a success. Someone else`s shortcut can be permanent.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:40 PM   #33
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This is why if one decides to paint raw or stripped teak instead of finishing it bright the wood should be sealed with CPES or even varnish before being painted. Then if it's decided later by the owner or the next owner to refinish the wood bright, the paint will not have been able to get down into the grain and the wood can be taken back to raw and a good-looking bright finish applied.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:34 AM   #34
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This is why if one decides to paint raw or stripped teak instead of finishing it bright the wood should be sealed with CPES or even varnish before being painted. Then if it's decided later by the owner or the next owner to refinish the wood bright, the paint will not have been able to get down into the grain and the wood can be taken back to raw and a good-looking bright finish applied.
This is what I have always done in the past for two reasons. One, it leaves the door open for the next owner to varnish. Two, thinned epoxy or varnish is an excellent primer/sealer for the oily teak.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:36 AM   #35
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Daddy's, if this is in time, you might still be able to cetol the cockpit door, as in my previous post. It will then look nearly as good as varnish, but it is more forgiving of imperfect paint removal....and, as others mentioned, a helluva lot more forgiving when it comes to re-coating. Just a thought. If it sucks, then not hard to paint over like the pilot doors, but I think you might enjoy one "almost varnished" door..?
I know I do.
Thanks but I do not have a cockpit door. Three doors all leading to the side decks.
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:37 AM   #36
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DO, Cetol is nice, and it should adhere fine to a properly applied penetrating epoxy substrate, but it is no where near as pretty as a varnished surface, IMO. Paint teak? I believe that would be the recommendation of the person who restored the artwork, below.

If you want the perfect look, do a good job of sanding, or removing all the paint using chemical stripper or heat gun and a pull scraper. Sand well, apply thinned epoxy to saturate the wood, wet sand to smooth, slop on a few coats of Interprime sealer to fill the grain, quick sand flat, then apply about 8 coats of Flagship varnish. Don't bother sanding between all coats, just the 4th and 7th. This may sound like overkill, but when you have the piece off the boat and on the bench, the difference between 3 coats of Cetol and 8 coats of varnish is about an hour and a half extra work. The difference in appearance, however, is well worth the effort.

After applying the epoxy, wait at least 3 days before applying anything else - this is important.

Just one man's opinion.

The art restoration equivalent of painting teak:
Awesome!!
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:43 AM   #37
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Ron, rwidman wrote that it's a crime to paint teak because it costs so much.
he's right BUT ...

I feel it has mostly to do w how beautiful it is when well finished clear.
I'm always amazed how my teak cap rail can look so old and forgotten only to quickly become stunningly beautiful. The wood is just too beautiful to cover up.

Like many/most others I think the problem that makes teak so troublesome is it's oil. The natural oil in the wood. If you've ever sanded teak the oil is very apparent as the "sand dust" sticks together somewhat as though it had oil in it (haha) and the wood itself is a bit greasy feeling like some plastic. For this reason I've decided to use oil based products on teak and quit fighting the un-winnable battle between oily teak and un-oily finishes. My primers are made up of heavy oil products like linseed oil, tung oil, pine tar, and also kerosene and turpentine to help keep the water from getting under the top coat. It's been very successful on a piece of plywood on my fore deck for several years. And I've been using only the oils on my teak cap rail for about 5 years so a full blown test is in order.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:05 AM   #38
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Paint teak? I believe that would be the recommendation of the person who restored the artwork, below.

The art restoration equivalent of painting teak:
Don't be shy! Tell us what you really think! (I love this!)
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:14 AM   #39
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Thanks but I do not have a cockpit door. Three doors all leading to the side decks.



If multi coats of epoxy/varnish is applied it might cover the remaining paint. Teak has alot of grain and some imperfection, so it should not be admired from nose length. Beside no body is going to be as critical as you.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:16 AM   #40
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[QUOTE=Delfin;135386]DO, Cetol is nice, and it should adhere fine to a properly applied penetrating epoxy substrate, but it is no where near as pretty as a varnished surface, IMO.

I agree but I will admit to hiring my varnish jobs out. I have neither the patience or the expertise to apply varnish properly.
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