Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-08-2013, 01:43 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
Jenny's Avatar
 
City: Ponte Vedra Beach, Fl
Country: US
Vessel Name: Jenny
Vessel Model: Bristol Trawler
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 30
Varnish for exterior

My 42" trawler needs her cabin doors revarnished.

They are a little to light for my taste. Should I take em down to bare wood or use a tinted varnish and go over existing?
__________________
Advertisement

Jenny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 04:16 PM   #2
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Poly, oil based, epoxy .... All work well But exterior work needs the most UV protection you can find.
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 04:37 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
City: EC FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 171
Bristol Finish - 2 part exterior varnish

Bristol Finish works very well here in the FL sunshine. Iíve gotten as many as 5 to 6 years on my one piece of exterior teak - the cap rail.

Take note though that if the varnished wood moves, Bristol will crack and once water gets under it, itís wood scraper time. You only need to redo the damaged area - it can be faired in.

I know that all (most?) wood finishes are susceptible to this, but Bristol seems a little bit harder and cracks a little earlier than some of the Interlux exterior varnishes.

Mike
Sceptic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 06:02 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
MVNoPlans's Avatar
 
City: Olympia
Country: USA
Vessel Name: No Plans
Vessel Model: 1965 TollyCraft Voyager
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 100
I would take it down to bare wood. Tinting the varnish gives a muddy finish over time. Mind you I don't live in the Florida sun, but I have been satisfied with Cabot Spar in Satin. Nothing lasts forever so I can't be bothered dropping the big dollars on a quart of juice when my boat is in a covered moorage.
MVNoPlans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 07:02 PM   #5
Guru
 
Capn Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 899
Jenny, we have owned two boats now with lots of teak. We have used every type of finish and varnish over the years. We finally settled on Cetol and have not regretted it one bit. You can use different bases to get different looks. We chose the natural with 3 coats and then 3 coats of gloss. Now we only have to do a maintenance coat once a year, even living in south Florida full time. My advise would be to walk the docks and see if a neighbor boat has a finish you like. Then talk to the owner about how maintenance intensive that finish is. Here are a couple of our blog posts, The Trawler Beach House: Another Update and The Trawler Beach House: Refinishing The Hatches . Chuck
__________________
Blogs
Beach House
Sea Trek
Capn Chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 07:39 PM   #6
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenny View Post
My 42" trawler needs her cabin doors revarnished.

They are a little to light for my taste. Should I take em down to bare wood or use a tinted varnish and go over existing?
The light color is probably due to bleaching of the wood through the varnish. Heat gun or chemically strip (covering the stripper with saran wrap to increase effectiveness), then sand enough to reveal the darker color.

Thin epoxy with MEK to the thickness of paint thinner, then apply to saturate the wood. This may cause some 'furring', and lightly sand with 80 grit to remove the fur and take out any surface epoxy.

My preference is to use 8 - 10 coats of Flagship varnish, but you'll hear lots of other suggestions from others. However, the preparation above should ensure a very long lasting result.

A definite no on the tinted varnish.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 07:48 PM   #7
Guru
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Vessel Name: Anastasia III
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,716
Do you know what varnish is on there now? Additional coats will darken the appearance somewhat with any varnish.
Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 05:28 PM   #8
Veteran Member
 
Jenny's Avatar
 
City: Ponte Vedra Beach, Fl
Country: US
Vessel Name: Jenny
Vessel Model: Bristol Trawler
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 30
Varnish

I don't know what is on now...

I thinkI've chosen to sand down and start over.
Jenny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 08:23 PM   #9
Guru
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Vessel Name: Anastasia III
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,716
I can highly recommend Honey Teak. I've used it for about 12 years and love it. It's a three part polyurethane. You put on some of the base coat (pigmented) then the clear coat and it's beautiful and durable. If you do it properly, you can go 2 years without touching it, more if it's in the shade. Take a look at Signature Finish and Honey Teak Products - Home It's only available direct from Tom, a great guy!
Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 08:52 PM   #10
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,166
Jenny:

I have tried them all. I have sanded down first and I have coated over old varnish. If it is colour you are after, recoating without taking the old varnish off will not change it much. New varnish will darken it slightly. If you take it down, the finer you sand after getting all the old varnish and all of the bleached wood off, the better it will look. I wouldn't stop going finer until you are sanding with 320 grit. Then choose the most expensive varnish you can find and you will get a great finish. In varnishes, you definitely get what you pay for.
I stopped switching and trying different varnishes after I discovered Epifanes.
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 08:58 PM   #11
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Country: US
Vessel Name: "Sandpiper"
Vessel Model: 2006 42' Ocean Alexander Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post
I stopped switching and trying different varnishes after I discovered Epifanes.
Me too!
__________________
Codger2

My passion for improving my boat(s) exceeds my desire to constantly cruise them.
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 10:59 AM   #12
Veteran Member
 
islandtimecruiser's Avatar
 
City: Cape Coral,Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Island Time
Vessel Model: 1990 Marine Trader DB
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capn Chuck View Post
Jenny, we have owned two boats now with lots of teak. We have used every type of finish and varnish over the years. We finally settled on Cetol and have not regretted it one bit. You can use different bases to get different looks. We chose the natural with 3 coats and then 3 coats of gloss. Now we only have to do a maintenance coat once a year, even living in south Florida full time. My advise would be to walk the docks and see if a neighbor boat has a finish you like. Then talk to the owner about how maintenance intensive that finish is. Here are a couple of our blog posts, The Trawler Beach House: Another Update and The Trawler Beach House: Refinishing The Hatches . Chuck
We just completed refinishing all of our exterior teak using Cetol as Captn Chuck described. It was an easier process than some of the other products we considered because we didn't have to sand between coats. We are very happy with the results.

Steve and Gina Smith
M/V Island Time
Cape Coral, Fl
islandtimecruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 01:40 PM   #13
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sceptic View Post
Bristol Finish works very well here in the FL sunshine. Iíve gotten as many as 5 to 6 years on my one piece of exterior teak - the cap rail.

Take note though that if the varnished wood moves, Bristol will crack and once water gets under it, itís wood scraper time. You only need to redo the damaged area - it can be faired in.

I know that all (most?) wood finishes are susceptible to this, but Bristol seems a little bit harder and cracks a little earlier than some of the Interlux exterior varnishes.

Mike
Yep, Capt. Mike's post is correct in all respects. We are in the Florida Sun. The last time I refinished with Bristol was August 2007. I will sand it a little and put on a few more coats this year. It is available in clear and a darker teak type color. We use the darker. It will go right over varnish if the varnish is sound. There would be no need to strip the varnish.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 01:50 PM   #14
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Islandtimecruiser,

Cetol is an oil based product and I would think it should require sanding between coats. Not so? How dry does it get before you re-coat?

People very vary rarely apply clear coat finishes to their boats in Alaska but they put Cetol on just about everything else including houses, fences, signs and much else. Many worship the stuff. There is cans of 4, 5 or 6 different kinds of the Cetol stuff in the hardware store in Craig Alaska .... mant different kinds. I've never used it but what is it that's different about Cetol. Just seems like hype to me but I've seen many Cetol finished stuff that looks good (except for the orange color that I hear is now avoidable) in the product line. It does seem to hold up well in the Alaskan weather.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 03:19 PM   #15
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
We've been using Bristol since it first came on the market in the very early 2000s as a three-part finish (base, catalyst, and retarder). Found it vastly superior to what we'd tried before and to all the stuff the boaters around us were using which included all manner of varnishes, Cetol, etc.

After a few years they eliminated the retarder and it's been a two- part product since. It can be tricky to apply, particularly to vertical surfaces, because it is very thin. But we learned-- by trial and error--- the right application technique and today would not even consider any other brightwork finish.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 06:37 PM   #16
Veteran Member
 
City: Palm Coast, Florida
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 73
We also have been using Bristol, we finished all removal prices today and we are waiting for a window without wind so we can do the door frames and cap rail. After 3 years we found the finish was "peeling" in some areas. We thought we might be able repair and apply up to 78 coats on the repair areas. What actually happened was that we could not find solid adhesion even where the Bristol looked good. We ended up stripping it all and will start over. This time we will apply Smiths CPES before applying the Bristol. Have read several other blogs where Bristol users have experienced same problem. Some think it's do to flexing. The doors jams appear fine but the cap rail really peeled off in small sheets.
Flatsflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 10:37 AM   #17
Guru
 
Scary's Avatar
 
City: Walnut Grove Ca
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cary'D Away
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 884
Epifanes. I've had good results as well. West Marine's best varnish is Epifanes, a buck or two cheaper.
Scary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 02:33 PM   #18
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flatsflyer View Post
The doors jams appear fine but the cap rail really peeled off in small sheets.
We've never experienced that, either with Bristol on raw wood or over older varnish that was in good shape.

One thing Bristol is absolutely intolerant of is any oil whatsoever in the wood it's being applied to. Even a long-distant oil finish that appears to be gone can prevent Bristol from adhering properly. So if wood has had any kind of oil finish on it in the past it has to be totally removed before applying Bristol. As a matter of course we wipe down any wood we are going to apply Bristol to with acetone prior to the application of the first coat of Bristol.

At least that's what we used to do.

A few years ago we switched to applying a few coats of CPES to raw wood prior to applying Bristol, and we put the first coat of Bristol on while the last coat of CPES is still a bit tacky. This is a technique highly recommended by some of the shipwrights/retired yard owners on the GB owners forum. We resisted it for a number of years because using the CPES first does darken the wood a bit. But we decided that superior finish adhesion was more important than a slightly lighter wood appearance.

If Bristol is going to be put on over a fully-cured (older) varnish finish that is in good condition, there is no value in applying CPES first as it won't gain you anything.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 04:21 PM   #19
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Oil based varnish dosn't last as long if you compare it to perfectly applied high tech stuff but lots and lots of people have trouble w it. Perhaps over 20 years an average job of applying and touching up oil based varnish will produce a finish that will be very acceptable to almost everyone w less effort, time and money spent.

New products are coming on the market all the time and there's more than enough guys that think new things are almost always better. I use AGM batteries and most of my anchors are way different than what I knew as a young man. Dripless propeller shaft seals don't drip but who needs a dripless seal? That's another place where I'm going to go back to the time tested product. Wanting to be looked up to by lesser and average people who use lesser and average things is at least connected to the ego but we're attracted to newer stuff that just plain works better also like Marin's anchor and his Bristol finish. I have far higher tech stuff that works better too but it dosn't look to me like there's any clear best way to go on varnish. I'll stay w oil base.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 07:09 PM   #20
Veteran Member
 
City: Palm Coast, Florida
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 73
I bought two Bristol kits in early 01/13. In the process now of applying. Tried to call Bristol tody, phones have been disconnected. Investigated further and was told the compnay is closed and in the process of being sold. Could not find out if the new buyer will keep factory in Melbourne,Fl. or move it someplace else.
__________________

Flatsflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012