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Old 06-11-2015, 02:12 AM   #101
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The drawback to leaving things like rails unfinished (as opposed to deck planks) is that it's just a matter of time before the teak will begin to crevice with the grain. Deck planks don't do this (unless provoked into it by pressure washing, heavy scrubbing with the grain, etc.) because of the way they are sawn. But in-the-round pieces like rails will weather into crevices relatively quickly depending on the climate. I've seen it happen on several boats, power and sail, on our dock over the years.

So if one wants to maximize the longevity of a smooth teak surface on things like hand, grab, and cap rails but doesn't want to finish bright, Eric is correct; better to paint the teak than leave it unprotected in the weather.

And if one decides to paint the raw teak, better to apply a coat of varnish first to seal the wood so that the paint will not penetrate down into the grain. This will make it easy to refinish the teak bright if the owner or a subsequent owners wants to go that direction in the future
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Old 06-11-2015, 02:52 AM   #102
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The drawback to leaving things like rails unfinished (as opposed to deck planks) is that it's just a matter of time before the teak will begin to crevice with the grain.
...
That time has already come. Quite a bit of sanding would be required to restore a smooth finish to my cap rails etc.

Richard
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Old 06-11-2015, 02:53 AM   #103
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Cetol Update

To everyone, many thanks who responded to my question about Cetol.

The take-home message from my post seems to be:

1. I should avoid cleaning with pressure washer as it drives water into the wood, drying can be uneven and lead to residual water under the finish, staining or mold

2. I did not apply enough coats originally (the weather turned bad, so I had to shut it down for the winter after 2 coats).

3. Preparation is key, with any coating, but Cetol may hold up longer with fewer coats.

4. I can repair the stained areas by sanding, or stripping the Cetol, using a brightener, or acetone, and then re-apply after it is thoroughly dry

5. Nice to put a gloss coat on top of the base coats (for looks).

I am so pleased to have everyones input. The weather is good again, and I will be taking Synergy out to the San Juan Islands in June. So no sanding or varnishing until I get some time on the water.

I can comment on why I chose Cetol in the first place. I tried layering a marine varnish (diluted with turpentine and oil) for the first few coats, but it turned color and lost its luster in one season. I have a house in the Kitsap Peninsula (a very rainy place) which is Cedar siding. The house has a window that is finished with varnish while the Cedar siding is finished with Cetol. Both were factory applied, to fresh wood. The Cetol is holding up beautifully after 7 years, while the varnish is crazed, flaked, pealing. I wish I had photos to post to show the difference in outcomes, under the exact same weather conditions, but that is for another day.

Like others, I have to consider the number of days I spend boating versus varnishing. Its all a tradeoff.

I will see if I can restore the stained areas and recoat.

Many, many thanks.
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Old 06-11-2015, 03:50 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Good grief. In the midst of this 90+ post long p*ssing contest has anyone else noticed that the OP (Mr. Cheech'), a newby, has not responded? I hope he has not been scared off after just 1 post...
RT Firely:
The OP is here ! I have been busy at my day (and night) job, while lurking the thread for answers and learning as much as I can. Takes a lot more to scare me off
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Old 06-11-2015, 06:34 AM   #105
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Old 09-10-2015, 11:08 AM   #106
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Sanded our bottom rail and used Cetol (assumed that's what was there before) Looked good at first but now has hazed over and obviously not adhered to the undercoat. Any way of knowing what was there before? It was in too good a condition to take down to the bare wood and start over.
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Old 09-10-2015, 11:44 AM   #107
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Teak Top Rails - To Cetol or Not Cetol

Deidra: I'm not entirely sure about your particular situation but I don't think you can resurrect it now. I'm of the opinion that it's often best to strip the old finish every few years. For my 42' vessel, stripping and sanding the cap rail would take me about 8-12 hours.

I use a heat gun and putty knife. Put the heat gun on the highest heat setting, and keep it moving over the wood or you will scorch it. I put the nozzle right on the wood with the putty knife following it. If you are scratching or gouging the wood, there's a problem! Stop and think about what's wrong. Go with the grain of the wood. Once stripped, sanding goes quickly, and in my view, less is more when it come to sanding. He goal is to remove the remaining old finish and get the "silver" off the exposed wood. Teak is soft and trying to get that last bit of black off is too difficult with an older boat. And I'm not a big fan,of chemicals as these can remove too much wood. Just leave it as the antique look.

I use 2 coats Cetol natural teak and up to 8 coats Cetol marine gloss. I'm pleased with the results on our boat.

Jim
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