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Old 08-16-2014, 11:07 AM   #21
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BruceK - did I understand you, that you painted fiberglass over the bow teak etc.?
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Old 08-16-2014, 11:26 AM   #22
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Not everyone lives in the Northwest

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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
teak decks in the North and teaks decks in the tropics are a bit different when it comes to longevity...plus use and how much cleaning they need.

while anything done right/better may last longer, sometimes environmentals trumps even the best install/maintenance.

also whomever posted that not all teak decks were created equal wins a prize too!
Constant humidity with mild temperatures make a huge difference with wooden decks. Or for that matter wooden boats. Nothing like hot dry summers and wet winters to ruin anything made of wood. If you want to destroy a wood deck in California leave your boat uncovered for a summer.
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Old 08-16-2014, 12:59 PM   #23
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So like a lot of things, the "teak decks are trouble" assumption tends to be blown way out of proportion. Yes, they can be crap and are better off being replaced. But this is not nearly as prevelant as it's generally made out to be.
With respect, and bare in mind I've taken care of as many as 12 GBs at one time in a charter fleet, GB teak decks are not the same as many others. Others use thinner teak from the start. They don't use solid fiberglass sub-decks but ones made of encapsulated plywood. In many cases they were careless when they screwed down the teak decks to the sub-deck and allowed water easy access to the plywood core or even screwed right through the subdeck, etc., etc. And at the cost per board foot for teak these days, many people can not afford to lay down a new deck. Let alone have the time and skills to do it themselves.

Sure it's fairly easy to maintain once you get it in good shape. But getting to that point for some people may not be realistic for many reasons.

And I think based on what I see regularly, poorly maintained teak decks that are either passed a realistic point of no return or close to it, have become pretty common as boats have reached in many cases the age of 30 or more years old.
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Old 08-16-2014, 01:14 PM   #24
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Grand Banks have a subdeck sandwich of a layer of fiberglass on top with a marine ply core and a layer of fiberglass on the bottom. I used to think GBs had solid glass decks despite being told otherwise by the shipwrights on the GB forum. Then I took a core out of our deck to mount a new anchor foot switch. Sure enough, it's a glass-plywood-glass sandwich, just like most other boats of the same type.

What a GB does have is a solid fiberglass hull. No coring of any kind. But the decks and cabin tops are all fiberglass-ply-fiberglass structures.
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Old 08-16-2014, 01:45 PM   #25
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Hmmm... maybe my memory is failing or they changed lay outs over the years. But I remember other than the woodys I worked on the sub-floor was solid glass.

I'll have to go take a look where the foot switches are install to see if I see what you saw.
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Old 08-16-2014, 02:07 PM   #26
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Our boat is one of the very first glass GBs made. It has a wood core deck. I've seen cores out of 1980s GBs and 1990s GBs from the boats in the local GB dealership that have had hardware like foot switches, windlasses, etc. installed on them.

And I watched a shipwright drill holes through the deck of a brand new 1998 GB52 that was being commissioned next to us when we first brought our boat to Bellingham. The holes were for additional cleats The drill bit brought up wood every time although at that point I didn't realize the significance of what I was seeing. Several years later when we installed additional cleats on our aft deck, same thing.

The person who first told me that GBs have cored decks is Bob Lowe, who for years owned Oak Harbor Boatworks on Whidbey Island. That company specialized (and I guess still does) in the maintenance, repair, restoration, and customization of Grand Banks boats. Bob has worked on every type and model of GB from the woodies to the later glass boats. If there is anyone on the planet in a position to know how GB decks are constructed, it's him.

He also founded and continues to participate in the GB owners forum. If anyone has a question about any aspect of GBs, he's the one to ask.

When I said on the GB forum not long after joining that GBs have solid glass decks (this is what I'd been told by a few people) he very tactfully told me I had no idea what I was talking about, and then went on to describe in great detail how the decks and cabin tops of fiberglass GBs are constructed.

Based on the core I took out of our deck, which I still have, the upper fiberglass layer is pretty thick, and the plywood core is quite thick. The fiberglass on the bottom is about half the thickness of the glass layer on top. However, the glass layer on top is not thick enough to keep deck screws from penetrating the plywood core.

So while GB's subdeck construction may be somewhat more robust than makes like CHB and so forth, in reality, and as far as what the effect of moisture getting under the teak planking is concerned, they are basically the same.
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Old 08-16-2014, 02:36 PM   #27
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I'm guessing there is no such thing as a short answer with you.

Based on all that, and knowing who Bob is, I'm betting my memory is wrong.

But I'm still going to look.
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Old 08-16-2014, 09:10 PM   #28
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Tontoross, afraid not. At considerable expense, the teak and gunk was removed, the zillion screw holes filled, 2 layers of f/glass laid, the surface filled and faired, and then painted in non slip. The rest got the same treatment, except only one layer of f/glass, before laying fresh teak.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:10 PM   #29
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I just installed a Mahogany teak

I just installed a Mahogany deck that should have been Teak but the boat owner didn't want to pay the price of teak. Oh well he'll pay the price soon enough. I installed this deck over glassed plywood. This is on a custom sailboat so the bottom of the deck is painted. I glued the strips of Mahogany down with epoxy using dive weights and five gallon buckets filled with water to hold it in place. No fasteners penetrating the deck. What a chore. The owner is planing to keep the deck varnished. Current prices for rough teak is upwards of $25 per board ft before machining. Mahogany is is in the $5.30 per bdft range. There is a 38' ketch in the yard right now that will need a new deck, all of the balsa coring has failed and is removed waiting for foam and glass replacement. The owner would like to replace the teak. We will see if she has the money and time.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:39 PM   #30
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That's beautiful work Scary!


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
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Old 08-17-2014, 03:22 AM   #31
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teak decks leak

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I just installed a Mahogany deck that should have been Teak but the boat owner didn't want to pay the price of teak. Oh well he'll pay the price soon enough. I installed this deck over glassed plywood. This is on a custom sailboat so the bottom of the deck is painted. I glued the strips of Mahogany down with epoxy using dive wights and five gallon buckets filled with water to hold it in place. No fasteners penetrating the deck. What a chore. The owner is planing to keep the deck varnished. Current prices for rough teak is upwards of $25 per board ft before machining. Mahogany is is in the $5.30 per bdft range.


You have got to be kidding me! A mahogany deck that he is going to varnish? Talk about throwing good money after bad. Hope his insurance is up to date for the slip and fall soon to come.
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:20 AM   #32
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What can I say

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You have got to be kidding me! A mahogany deck that he is going to varnish? Talk about throwing good money after bad. Hope his insurance is up to date for the slip and fall soon to come.
Some people take advice, some don't. There's a saying I believe by Will Rodgers( Some people learn from a book, others from observation, the rest of use have to pee on the electric fence for ourselves) Several people including myself advised against using Mahogany. The sticker shock of teak strip made the decision for him. There is about a weeks labor milling Mahogany, straightening rails, building pads for hardware, refitting hardware laying out and laying the the 2" strip in epoxy, sanding and fairing the deck and coating with penetrating epoxy. There will be another couple of days caulking and at least 8 hours spread over 10 days applying varnish. If he fails to maintain that deck it will all fail and that deck will have to be chipped off and the deck ground to start over. Sometimes you have to your head down and give the man what he asked for.
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Old 08-17-2014, 02:16 PM   #33
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Not sure I see the problem with a varnished mahogany deck other than it will be slippery. Chris Craft, Hacker Craft, Gar Wood, etc. all used mahogany decks on their boats. In fact more often than not the entire boat was made of mahogany.

I don't think a varnished deck is the smartest solution for a cruising or sailboat deck where you have to walk around on the decks a lot. But good deck shoes can cope with a wet, varnished deck pretty well, or so I've been told by the people we've met who have varnished decks. Bare feet can cope even better.

Growing up in Hawaii, I went out sometimes on a friend's 40' sloop and it had a varnished mahogany deck (the whole boat was made of mahogany). It wasn't a problem in terms of traction, and in the rough water in Hawaii the decks were always wet. But we always went barefoot.

Keeping the varnish in good shape in that climate was a whole other deal, but that wasn't my problem.

I took the first photo several years ago. This boat has since sold but is still on our dock. The family that now owns it uses it regularly. The varnish is pretty shot, particularly on the foredeck. But it's been that way for some six or seven years now and the wood and deck seams seem to be holding up just fine so far. Obviously if the owners let it continue this way the wood will eventually start to have problems.

I took the second photo at a Chris Craft rendezvous in the south Sound. This boat lives in a boathouse which reduces maintenance greatly. At the time I talked to them, the owners used it regularly for cruises in the Sound.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:23 AM   #34
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If you say so. But based on my experience with varnished mahogany decks on a Riva Venetian water taxi, I'll pass on varnished decks. Of any kind of wood.
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Old 08-18-2014, 09:46 AM   #35
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To my mind , none of the decks described are Teak Decks, they are teak overlays of some sort.

On a real Teak Deck the teak IS the deck, not a form of trim applique to a deck of some sort.

Heavier and more expensive to install, but the value goes to the owners over the decades , as they can be maintained and rot far less than plywood.

I know of a number of folks that scraped up the teal paint hob , and laid down glass to end the leaks.
Two folks put down a core and glassed over to be able to operate offshore.

So far I know of no one that installed a REAL TEAK deck on a rebuild.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:05 AM   #36
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To my mind , none of the decks described are Teak Decks, they are teak overlays of some sort.

On a real Teak Deck the teak IS the deck, not a form of trim applique to a deck of some sort.

Heavier and more expensive to install, but the value goes to the owners over the decades , as they can be maintained and rot far less than plywood.

I know of a number of folks that scraped up the teal paint hob , and laid down glass to end the leaks.
Two folks put down a core and glassed over to be able to operate offshore.

So far I know of no one that installed a REAL TEAK deck on a rebuild.
You mean you don't know anybody who has taken their fiberglass boat and rebuilt it as a woody? Imagine that.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:26 AM   #37
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Talk about reverse engineering

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You mean you don't know anybody who has taken their fiberglass boat and rebuilt it as a woody? Imagine that.
Real teak decks leak. Imagine stoning real teak deck and caulking with oakum and hot tar or pitch every few months. I hear rhe boss now when she sees little blobs of tar on the light carpet, opps did I say carpet.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:48 AM   #38
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Now here are some teak decks...real teak decks. Kindda nice to have a crew for maintenance. Me, I will forgo the teak decks, I want a mechanically inclined engine room dwarf, midget, little person or what ever the most politically correct term of the week is.

Battleship USS Missouri, Mighty Mo BB-63, Holystoning


Also....
Teak Deck of the Battleship Missouri docked at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
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Old 08-19-2014, 12:59 AM   #39
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I want a mechanically inclined engine room dwarf, midget, little person or what ever the most politically correct term of the week is.
I agree. I've always said you could make good money with a crew of trained Little People as mechanics and technicians.
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Old 08-19-2014, 04:05 AM   #40
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I used a product called Www.grizzlygrio.com It comes in a bunch of colors and has worked well for the last five years. I went right over the teak decks and it came out very nice.
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