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Old 12-12-2012, 08:33 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
There is a reason the Navy, which loves to put paint or coatings on anything, kept the huge teak decks on their battleships natural.
Well... the Navy actually PAINTED the teak over during war time. Teak wasn't used for it's strength or beauty, it was for it's insulation properties. They never oiled it, and holy stoned it during peacetime to keep it nice looking.

To each his own on the subject of oiling. I chose to.
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Old 12-12-2012, 08:39 PM   #22
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What we were advised to do with regards to washing our teak deck by the people mentioned in my earlier post was to use salt water and Lemon Joy. Lemon Joy because it suds up nicely in cold water, and salt water because if there is a separated seam, which can sometimes be very hard to detect, salt water will be leaking down under the planks, not fresh water.

When the question is asked on the GB forum, "What if my boat is in fresh water?" the answer always given is "Make your own salt water. The wood's not gonna care where the salt comes from."
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Old 12-12-2012, 08:56 PM   #23
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The wood decks on battleships and such were primarily for insulation against heat as SomeSailor wrote. Some ships, certain cruisers in the example I read, could not be deployed to the South Pacific because their uncovered steel decks made it unbearably hot in the spaces under the decks.

Another factor was basic tradition. Naval ships were "supposed" to have wood decks so they put at least a vestige of them on the battleships. But insulation was the big driver.

The wood decks on carriers were for two reasons. One, a heavy armored steel fight deck that high on the ship would create stability issues. So using a light steel deck covered with wood provided the strength required without the weight.

The other reason, and this applied to the battleships as well, is that it was thought that repairs to a battle-damaged wood flight deck surface would be much easier and faster to make than repairs to a bent and twisted steel deck. So covering the flight deck with wood would "protect" the steel deck underneath, at least to a degree. Whether that theory proved true during the war is probably debatable.
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Old 12-12-2012, 09:10 PM   #24
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I've spend many a day walking on the steel decks of aircraft carriers (23 years) and you're 100% correct. Repairing a wooden deck was easier than steel away from port, but armored decks soon became necessary.

To this day there is lots of wood aboard aircraft carriers. The Navy loves it's tradition.
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Old 12-12-2012, 09:16 PM   #25
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The USS Midway, launched shortly before the end of WWII and too big to transit the Panama Canal, has a steel deck. Was she the first US carrier to be so constructed?

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Old 12-12-2012, 09:30 PM   #26
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Well, I guess my old man, his brother and all of their buddies must have been hallucinating under the South Pacific sun. No match for the Internet those old fogies.

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Old 12-12-2012, 09:40 PM   #27
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Yep. Midway was a cool old gal.

Little known fact: She could transit the canal if needed. Everything up until the Nimitz Class ships were built with lay-down masts and fold-up decks and catwalks if she had to get through the canal.

It wasn't like flipping a switch, but they could be cut free and pulled up. The mast could also be laid down if transiting low bridges was necessary. The hinge points are welded solid, but still you can see it would be done if necessary.
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Old 12-12-2012, 09:50 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
Well, I guess my old man, his brother and all of their buddies must have been hallucinating under the South Pacific sun.
I've never seen them anything but natural myself, but I was told it was because the teak stood out against the sea. Hence the paint.

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