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Old 08-21-2011, 08:45 AM   #21
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RE: Teak Deck Removal

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SeaHorse II wrote:
My boat has recessed deck fills and pumpouts, away from the deck traffic.

*

To the left of the ER air intake, is the waste tank fitting. (double vented) & to the right is the fuel fill.
*Excellnt solution.
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Old 08-22-2011, 09:32 AM   #22
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RE: Teak Deck Removal

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Tony B wrote:Exactly how difficult and how time consuming is removing a teak deck and re-coring the deck and replacing with fiberglass?
*Regardless of what you might hear otherwise, to do it right is a major job.* A few years ago we watched a fellow on our dock replace the teak decking on his 36' (or maybe 38') Island Gypsy.* He did not have to do any core work, he was just removing the teak.

The teak planking on most boats adds stiffness ot the deck (not strength, stiffness, there's a difference) and the builders will most likely take this into account when determining the thickness of the fiberglass-wood-fiberglass sandwich that most subdecks consist of.* So removing the teak planking on many types of boats will reduce the stiffness of the subdeck.* If this stiffness is not restored, the deck will flex more than it should and it's conceivable that small cracks could develop in the upper fiberglass layer that could allow moisture to get down into the core.

So the proper solution is to remove the planking, prep the fiberglass surface of the subdeck, and then add layers of fiberglass matting and resin on top of the subdeck to restore the stiffness followed by whatever sort of non-skid surface you prefer.

The fellow with the Island Gypsy put four layers of glass over the subdeck of his boat after the wood was removed.* The retired marine engineer who has a boat on our dock and had a career with one of the best-known production boat companies in the US felt that four layers of glass was overkill, and that two would have done the job very nicely.* Most of the people on the Grand Banks owners forum who have removed their boat's original decking went with two layers of glass over the subdeck.

The Island Gypsy owner did an absolutely superb job.* I suspect his work is better than what the manufacturer would have done had they built the boat with a fiberglass-surfaced deck to begin with.* His deck is probably strong and stiff enough to land a plane on :-)* But it was a huge amount of work.* It took a full summer plus about half of the following summer to do it.* We talked to him shortly after he'd completed the work and his comment then was, "Had I known at the outset how much time and effort would be required I never would have done it."

As I said, he did not have to do any subdeck replacement so I have no idea how extensive a job that entails.* And while there are people who talk about all sorts of quicky solutions for removing teak planking-- from simply filling screw holes and applying non-skid to using truck-bed liner to you-name-it-- I believe-- as do the experienced shipwrights on the GB forum--- that the only true, permanent solution is to do what the Island Gypsy owner and GB owners have done, and that's to do the job properly from the outset.* Given the amount of work required, it's not something to be taken on lightly.
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Old 08-22-2011, 10:00 AM   #23
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RE: Teak Deck Removal

Thanks to everyone for your input.

Hopefully, I will find a boat with the teak deck already removed and repaired. I think that if the teak deck is the only real problem it wont be a deal breaker. If the boat has other major issues, then the deck will probably be the killer.
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Old 08-23-2011, 04:47 AM   #24
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RE: Teak Deck Removal

adds stiffness ot the deck (not strength, stiffness, there's a difference) and the builders will most likely take this into account when determining the thickness of the fiberglass-wood-fiberglass sandwich that most subdecks consist of.

Perhaps , but the teak was an OPTION so when the deck was being created there was no certainty the option would be ordered.

Only IF the dealer was able to sell the "teak deck" was the overlay added.
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:15 AM   #25
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RE: Teak Deck Removal

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Perhaps , but the teak was an OPTION so when the deck was being created there was no certainty the option would be ordered.

Only IF the dealer was able to sell the "teak deck" was the overlay added.
*That is not the story I got from a person who was looking to become a dealer in the early 80s. He tried to order a boat with fiberglass decks and it cost lots more $$ because they had to add fiberglass layers for stiffness. The teak was standard because it was cheaper than glass work.

At least that is the story I got.
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:50 AM   #26
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RE: Teak Deck Removal

On my '86 Krogen, there is perfectly good non-skid molded into the deck under the teak. Then they screwed the teak down with 1000's of screws. Gotta replace about 100 annually due to the deck wear and the bungs fall out at about 1/16" thickness.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:49 PM   #27
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Woodsong: I'm very interested in your technique of cutting out the whole deck and replacing, rather than taking up the old teak, removing screws, cleaning off black mastic, sanding back, re-glassing sub-deck and then gluing new deck over: your way makes more sense ! Once cut out, how did you go about installing a new deck and what was your finished decking material? I'm needing to 're-do' the foredeck on my 52'-er.
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Old 07-15-2012, 07:09 PM   #28
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I just finished my foredeck. I removed the deck hardware and teak myself, which was fairly easy as the fasteners were square drive screws that the epoxy came out of quite easily. I salvaged over 95% of the teak, but don't know what I'll do with it yet. The rest was completed by a contractor.

For those who just want numbers: contractor ended up at $173/sq ft, to a very well faired finish. Included in that was 2.5 hours labour ($113) and $60 per sq ft in materials.

Because we could not support the deck from underneath due to a complicated headliner on ply then 3-4" gap to the lower glass layer of the deck, we did it in strips about 3' wide across the full width of the deck. Doing it in sections like this increased the labour, but avoided a lot of work to remove and replace the headliner. Had I wanted to store a dinghy up front then removing headliner and using the airspace to put some support bearers would have made sense. If I were ever to do this to another one of these OA's, I might go that route.

The top layer of glass was cut and the wet/rotten balsa core removed. The lower glass was faired to be quite smooth and then two layers of 1/4" marine ply bonded down with overlapping seams. The deck is cambered so the result was reasonably stiff. Then topped off by about 3/16 of new glass. The end result was a deck restored to original 7/8" thickness (excluding the original teak which was 1/2").

But no teak back on top: awlgrip with glass beads to give an excellent non-slip finish instead.

Were I doing it again I might have add a 3rd layer of 1/4" marine ply where the teak had been. ie just leave water channels at the side.
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:40 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquabelle View Post
Woodsong: I'm very interested in your technique of cutting out the whole deck and replacing, rather than taking up the old teak, removing screws, cleaning off black mastic, sanding back, re-glassing sub-deck and then gluing new deck over: your way makes more sense ! Once cut out, how did you go about installing a new deck and what was your finished decking material? I'm needing to 're-do' the foredeck on my 52'-er.
I did the same for my flybridge soft spot. Area repaired was 7 feet by 3 1/2 feet.

The teak was slow going till I gave up and used a 1/2 inch drill with a 3/4 hole saw no mandrel to drill around the bungs. The teak then pulled up easy and the black stuff came up easy to..what didn't easily sanded. The screws then were easy to deal with...if the head was good, the 1/2 inch drill was used, if the screw head was filled with goop or repair goop...vice grips easily spun it out. The whole bridge deck with cutting out the seats only took a couple days once I discovered the hole saw method.

For the soft spot a circular saw was used to cut the top skin and down through the block core, pulled out all the teak blocks...because the roof beams were so close...I used 1/2 inch marine 7ply as the core with just with splotches of thickened epoxy to tack it down, epoxied the top skin back on and faired in the cuts. Whole top deck got a layer of 6oz cloth, 18 oz roving and topped with 6oz cloth. Paint and non-skid but ultimately will have a light grey outdoor carpet cover the whole area to hide the occasional imperfection, provide traction and a bit of insulation.

Top pic finished repair prior to painting, bottom pic exploratory surgery...
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Old 07-16-2012, 04:35 PM   #30
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OK, here are a couple of quick photos:

Paint sequence was, after fairing/primer:

Awlgrip Stark White around edges, up to toe rail etc. You can see a line across from the base of the Portuguese bridge door. I've yet to buff the gelcoat above, then the line will be less obvious.

Then Awlgrip MoonDust with glass beads sprinkled on via 'salt shaker'. Two coats -second one gets the non-slip finish really even. Third coat of paint to seal tops of beads.

Masked off around cleats, avoid having non-slip chafe mooring lines.
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Old 10-06-2012, 10:04 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I did the same for my flybridge soft spot. Area repaired was 7 feet by 3 1/2 feet.

The teak was slow going till I gave up and used a 1/2 inch drill with a 3/4 hole saw no mandrel to drill around the bungs. The teak then pulled up easy and the black stuff came up easy to..what didn't easily sanded. The screws then were easy to deal with...if the head was good, the 1/2 inch drill was used, if the screw head was filled with goop or repair goop...vice grips easily spun it out. The whole bridge deck with cutting out the seats only took a couple days once I discovered the hole saw method.

For the soft spot a circular saw was used to cut the top skin and down through the block core, pulled out all the teak blocks...because the roof beams were so close...I used 1/2 inch marine 7ply as the core with just with splotches of thickened epoxy to tack it down, epoxied the top skin back on and faired in the cuts. Whole top deck got a layer of 6oz cloth, 18 oz roving and topped with 6oz cloth. Paint and non-skid but ultimately will have a light grey outdoor carpet cover the whole area to hide the occasional imperfection, provide traction and a bit of insulation.

Top pic finished repair prior to painting, bottom pic exploratory surgery...

How did the carpeting past of the project turn out? My flybridge deck is solid, following a re-do by the PO but a little bumpy the way the "non-skid" was applied. I have been thinking about covering it all with exterior carpet. I see lots of Searay-type boats, as well as pontoon and deck boats, with exposed carpeting, and of course it's an additional maintenance item, but what I have now ain't great-looking. Has anyone else done this? Regrets?
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:31 AM   #32
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How did the carpeting past of the project turn out? My flybridge deck is solid, following a re-do by the PO but a little bumpy the way the "non-skid" was applied. I have been thinking about covering it all with exterior carpet. I see lots of Searay-type boats, as well as pontoon and deck boats, with exposed carpeting, and of course it's an additional maintenance item, but what I have now ain't great-looking. Has anyone else done this? Regrets?
$75 clearance outdoor carpet at Lowes, great nonskid, bought enough for dash under front/rear salon windows and flybridge.....even enough for interior and stair treads if I want to make it simple and don't want expensive throw rugs. Can be edged for $1.00/foot.
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:37 AM   #33
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I have three small areas ( 1-2' size ) that are soft however my maintenance guy said once he starts they will extend in size. He also said that it could take up to 8-10wks to repair. This for me will be placing it in the Marina yard shed or erecting a shelter like Chip built and doing it on my property. I am contemplating looking at building a quonset sometime in the future on my property for maintenance work and storage anyway. I have however a couple of dilemmas, one the weather and two when to actually do this. If I get it done during the off season the yard shed becomes expensive not to mention the labor and material. If I do it during boating season ( short up my way ) I lose time on the water. My maintenance guy said that if I needed a Survey done and I had it done before and after repairs it probably wouldn't increase the figure by much but the long-term contentment and preventative measures would be worth it. Maybe I'll wait until I retire in 5 or so years and do it myself during the off season.

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Old 10-06-2012, 12:09 PM   #34
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$75 clearance outdoor carpet at Lowes, great nonskid, bought enough for dash under front/rear salon windows and flybridge.....even enough for interior and stair treads if I want to make it simple and don't want expensive throw rugs. Can be edged for $1.00/foot.
If you used a polyurethane paint on the deck, keep an eye on the finish. The carpet can trap and hold moisture. This can (most likely will) cause blistering or de-lamination of the painted surface. This is one of the downsides of urethane paints.
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:15 PM   #35
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If you used a polyurethane paint on the deck, keep an eye on the finish. The carpet can trap and hold moisture. This can (most likely will) cause blistering or de-lamination of the painted surface. This is one of the downsides of urethane paints.
Thanks...the stuff is pretty thin and dries fast (no backing) which is why I wanted it...
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Old 10-07-2012, 06:30 AM   #36
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and re-coring the deck and replacing with fiberglass?

A far easier and stronger job is done by simply cleaning the teak off and grinding the old top surface to glass.

Then a core material can be installed , usually with thickened Epoxy troweled , and weight placed on the core material.

When the entire deck is core covered the top GRP layers are added .This can be cheaper vynelester

This gives a far stiffer and stronger (and insulated) deck with no huge weight increase of enough layers of glass to restore stiffness.
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Old 10-03-2014, 09:36 PM   #37
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Removing Teak Decks on Grand Banks 42'

Anyone take the Decks Off a Grand Banks 42? Anyone know of anyone in Mass/R/I who does it professionally??? Would appreciate any advice on the job!
Thanks,
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Old 10-03-2014, 10:43 PM   #38
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Pose your question on the Grand Banks owner forum ( www.grandbanksowners.com ). Some of the GB forum members have done this, and the founder of the forum, Bob Lowe, for years ran Oak Harbor Boatworks, a yard in this area that specializes in the maintenance, repair, upgrading, and customization of Grand Banks boats. He probably knows more about what's involved in this task than most other people out there.
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