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Old 11-11-2014, 07:17 PM   #21
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As you genitally scrub the part 2 around be sure you get it into all the areas covered with the part 1 so it can react with the part 1 and cause the teak to go blond
Wow, talk about needing protection!
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:26 PM   #22
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BTW, the reason to clean a teak deck with salt water is not because teak likes salt water. The reason to use salt water is if there are any bad seams, missing plugs, or whatever that can let water get down under the teak planking. From there it can migrate down past the deck screws into the wood core of the subdeck. Even most so-called fiberglass subdecks have a wood core, and salt water is less conducive to the promotion of dry rot than fresh water.

That's the only reason to use salt water. If you have a newer boat that has glued-down teack deck planks and no screws penetrating the subdeck, there is no real advantage to using salt water because if water should get down under the teak, it can't migrate down into the subdeck. Except perhaps down past deck hardware fastenings.
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:31 PM   #23
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Sandpaper removes the wood mechanicaly, teak cleaners/restorers remove the wood chemically. Either way, wood goes away and you cannot get it back. The more you use teak cleaner/restorer, the faster the deck goes away. If you insist on using a teak cleaner/restorer, every time you apply it imagine yourself giving the deck a sanding because that is exactly what you're doing.
Actually 2 part cleaner is worse than sanding. In that it eats away the pith even more than the harder wood fibers leaving the deck with a grooved surface that traps dirt, grime and promotes the growth of mold. Where as sanding knocks them both down and produces a smooth even surface.

Like it or not, at some point the deck is going to need to be sanded. And in fact if the deck has been properly built and installed it can be sanded at least a couple of times in it's life with no ill effects.
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:43 PM   #24
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BTW, the reason to clean a teak deck with salt water is not because teak likes salt water. The reason to use salt water is if there are any bad seams, missing plugs, or whatever that can let water get down under the teak planking. From there it can migrate down past the deck screws into the wood core of the subdeck. Even most so-called fiberglass subdecks have a wood core, and salt water is less conducive to the promotion of dry rot than fresh water.

That's the only reason to use salt water. If you have a newer boat that has glued-down teack deck planks and no screws penetrating the subdeck, there is no real advantage to using salt water because if water should get down under the teak, it can't migrate down into the subdeck. Except perhaps down past deck hardware fastenings.
That may all be true. Although I've never heard that before.

But the old school reason for cleaning teak with salt water is because the teak absorbs some of the minerals in the salt water and that is a big factor in getting that clean but silver grey look to the teak. Plus it works very well to stop mold from growing.
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:09 PM   #25
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Good point about the teak cleaners, Capt. Bill.

As to the salt water thing, that I learned from several sources, one being Bob Lowe on the GB owners forum who probably knows more about the care and feeding of GBs including their decks than God. But also from several of the shipwrights we've had work on our boat, including the very experienced guy who re-grooved and re-seamed our main deck back in 1999 or thereabouts.

The bit about the minerals may be true, too, however. Nobody I've talked to mentioned that aspect of using salt water, however. It was all about the potential effect on the subdeck core.

The clipper ship Cutty Sark, on display in London, had an iron-framed hull with teak planking. Most of the planking on the ship until it burned recently was original. Of course, it was also very, very thick planking, hull and deck. Not anyting like the less-than-an-inch-thick deck planking on the typical recreational boat.

If one has a boat with a teak deck and wants to keep the brown or blonde look, the best thing to do is to keep the boat covered. We have a full flying bridge cover on our boat, and since we never drive from up there the cover stays on most of the year. The teak on the flying bridge deck, while slightly silver in places, still has a lot of brown in it. We have not touched the deck since buying the boat other than a couple of small seam repairs. But the wood has not been cleaned, sanded, nothing since we acquired in in 1998. But the brown/tan color remains simply because it's not exposed to UV, dirt, and the weather.
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Old 11-12-2014, 04:40 AM   #26
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Because of the sundeck over my reardeck 80% stays brown the very back ( the hatch will age grey)

As far as sanding mine has not been sanded but I have redone the edge joints and the screw plugs

I thought it interesting I have 2 Grandbanks on my dock one keeps his teak natural aged grey the other oiled and parts spar varnished and even has the entire rail covered
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