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Old 12-07-2016, 09:46 AM   #1
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Teak deck and Coelan product

Like to get some reviews on using Coelan on a teak deck, anyone used it?
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:02 PM   #2
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I used Coelan in 2010

When applied it is truly wonderful in appearance. I applied it because I wanted a leak proof finish. I used a belt sander, 120 grit with the grain and removed all the previous coating. I think it was Cetol.
I had about 200 square feet of teak, composed a of fly bridge deck, covered by a full enclosed bimini and a cabin deck open to the elements. I do cover the whole boat with a Lohman cover from October to March or April.

The good news. After 6 years of use it has not leaked. And except for one corner the covering has not lifted or been penetrated. On the fly bridge, under the bimini the deck looks brand new. It has that glossy plastic coating look.

The bad news.
Its expensive.

I can be slippery when wet.

Application is very difficult in that there can be absolutely no moisture when applying it. And by no moisture I mean you have to where rags around your wrists and forehead so your sweat does not drop on the deck. The fumes are really toxic. It killed every spider on board. You better wear a respirator with an organic filter. Because you have to have the deck covered to prevent against rain and dew, the fumes will be concentrated.

But the biggest disappointment are the mold spots that appear under the coating. I think they are mold spots. They are tiny black specs. The actual coating 'breaths' so when the coating gets wet the caulking lines will fog up. When it drys they will become black again.

Aside from the little black specs. I have been pleased with the covering. There has been no water integration.
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Old 12-08-2016, 06:51 PM   #3
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GrahamDouglass did you use it on teak trim pieces or hand rails also? If so how did that work out? The reviews I saw sound good. How is it removed if needed?
Thanks!
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Old 12-09-2016, 04:38 PM   #4
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Coelan on teak deck

I just used it on the teak deck. The previous owner had used enough Cetol or other unknown varnish to turn the deck an ugly brown in parts.

The cost to remove and replace with with a fiberglass coat was upwards of $10,000 in 2010. My cost in materials was somewhere between $2000 and $3000. Only the teak decks were done. I wanted a leak proof finish. With the elasticity of the product it would never crack or shrink with the expansion and contraction of the teak in temperature extremes or flexing with the boat. The product also breaths and vents when it gets wet. You can see the caulking fog up in wet weather and then dry out.

The only problem being in Canada its that it has to be imported from the states.
I never questioned them about the black spots that appeared under the coating that was exposed to the elements. They might have a solution to that.
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Old 12-09-2016, 04:56 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grahamdouglass View Post

I can be slippery when wet.

.
Wifey B: Figure you meant "it" not "I". Not even going the "I" route. Ok, it being slippery when wet would defeat the whole idea of using it on a boat deck in my mind. You just gave that 6 casual words in the middle, like glossing over it, but don't you consider that a serious shortcoming? That's without even mentioning "black mold" which I sure hope isn't what you've got.
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Old 12-09-2016, 06:36 PM   #6
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Slippery when wet

Before editing for brevity I did contain a reference to using Walnut shells or some other grit to provide a grip. So the slip hazard can be contained. Its not 'ice slippery' but it is not as sure grip as bare teak or Interlux 'Interdeck' . I have Intedeck deck paint on my deck.
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