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Old 03-17-2019, 04:24 PM   #1
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Teak

Looking at a Trader (1982) that is being sold by original owner. It has Teak Decks and they all appear to be in great shape and all polished/shined.

Just wanting opinions on possible rot.

Thanks
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Old 03-17-2019, 04:56 PM   #2
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If it does not currently have water in the deck core it will eventually get it. Unfortunately when they installed teak decking back in the day, they screwed it in hundreds of places. Water will work itís way into the coring. Water can get into the coring even without all of the hundreds of deck screws. But if you like the boat and are handy it can be fixed, just a question of time and back muscles...
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Old 03-17-2019, 05:05 PM   #3
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Thanks. Can you give more info on what you mean by "core" and back muscles for repair when needed? I guess I am saying what can be done to prevent if not already a problem and what needs to be done if there is a problem.

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Old 03-17-2019, 05:11 PM   #4
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Underneath that teak is a tar like substance on top of a thin layer of Fiberglas which is then on top of a whole bunch of 8x8 squares of plywood (core). Each bung hole you see has a screw sticking down into that wood. Then, wherever there is a through the deck fitting (fuel, water, waste) is another place for water to get into and either soak that core and/or find its way to leak onto the tips of your fuel tanks or behind and under them.

Thus ďcoreĒ, more issues than suggested and all the back muscles it takes to either rip it all up or pay to do soó- in a nutshell
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Old 03-17-2019, 05:19 PM   #5
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Well, I have teak decks on my sundeck which is well protected but the caulking finally bit the dust. So over the winter I stripped out the old caulking, sanded the grooves and then sanded the varnish off the teak. Waiting on warmer weather to put in the new caulk but I probably have 80+ hours on my hands and knees so far. That is what I meant about back muscles. The coring I was referring to is the wood between the top fiberglass and the bottom fiberglass. The teak decks are screwed through the top fiberglass and into the coring. Over time water can work itís way down into the coring and the core will rot and loose itís strength. The water can get in by going down along the screws or more likely by the caulking going bad. To repair the core you need to remove the teak, cut out the top fiberglass, tear out the rotted core, replace the core and then replace the top fiberglass and refinish the deck by either glassing and painting or putting on new teak since you probably destroyed the old teak getting it off. It isnít had technically just a lot of labor, on your hands and knees, there go those back muscles again. I havd back issues as you may have figured out, maybe your back isnít an issue. Personally I wish my sundeck did not have teak decks. They are beautiful but a PITA as far as maintenance. Good luck with whatever way you go.
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Old 03-17-2019, 05:40 PM   #6
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Let`s not condemn the decks before examination.They are reported as looking good,that`s unusual,so start there.
Are they original? Maybe the boat was kept under cover.They would have been screwed onto the "real" deck, are there teak plugs over screws? If the decks have been renewed,they will be mostly glued,with screws used just at margins,or around hatches etc.
If you see missing plugs, visible screw heads ground down by vigorous sanding of the teak, degraded caulk,it needs work.
My 1981 boat has a foam deck core,it needed very little attention when my decks were renovated. See if you can determine what the core is. If it is rotting wood, the job gets bigger.
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Old 03-17-2019, 05:46 PM   #7
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Are the decks in great shape because the boat was kept under cover it's entire life? If so you may be good to go for several more years. A survey will find any problems for sure.
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Old 03-17-2019, 05:56 PM   #8
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Thanks, I will use all that info in evaluation.
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Old 03-17-2019, 06:08 PM   #9
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I am not condemning the decks outright, but letís get real he is looking at a 1982 Marine Trader. The boat is 37 years old. Marine Traders, depending on the yard they were built in, are notorious for bad deck core. Some are better than others depending on the yard, but I donít think there are any records as to what yard they were built in. As to a survey finding all the problems, not likely. Any survey will miss stuff no matter how good the surveyor is. My current boat is a prime example, I had a highly regarded surveyor do the survey and there were things that he and I both missed. Such is life when you buy an older boat. Just be prepared for rotten deck core, rusting fuel tanks, soft stringers and electrical problems. Depending on how good you are at fixing boats these are not insurmountable problems, just be aware going in. My boat does not have teak decks on the bow and sides thankfully but still has had rotten deck core due to bad installation of the windlass and deck fittings. I am now in the process of repairing the poor previous deck repairs. Not much will dissuade me from buying the boat I want because I love working on boats. But at my age now and with misc health issues, I donít want to get into recoring stringers, but decks are pretty easy to do. My point is to know what you are getting into and stay within your abilities and pocket book when you buy a boat.
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Old 03-17-2019, 06:35 PM   #10
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Teak? Eek! It is beautiful but a long-term maintenance burden. Wood belongs to the interior.
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Old 03-17-2019, 08:14 PM   #11
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Teak? Eek! It is beautiful but a long-term maintenance burden. Wood belongs to the interior.
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Old 03-18-2019, 06:29 AM   #12
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"Unfortunately when they installed teak decking back in the day, they screwed it in hundreds of places."

Don't be fooled by all the plugs that should have screws under.

Ask the folks that have pried the teak covering off the deck how many screws were actually used.
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:04 AM   #13
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I have a 1983 trawler and the decks are in good shape. I have re caulked several areas. It's not too bad of a job if you take small bites.
I leave it natural, and we don't scrub the decks.
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Old 03-18-2019, 08:09 AM   #14
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As part of upgrading Magic we removed the teak decks from the cockpit forward. Hereís the new look. Also note the new ss hand rails.
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:30 PM   #15
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I have a 1983 trawler and the decks are in good shape. I have re caulked several areas. It's not too bad of a job if you take small bites.
I leave it natural, and we don't scrub the decks.
I let the N46 BIG rail cap go natural. I got so much grief from other boater and folks who walked by, after a bit over a year, I had it refinished. It was not inexpensive. I should have considered crowd funding. LOL
I thought the natural cap made it look more salty.
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Old 03-18-2019, 08:26 PM   #16
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Its easy to tell if there is water damage. Make sure the broker does not get there before you so that you are right there when the door is open. Mildew/mould smell tells the tale. Look for discoloured or damaged interior teak around windows and PARTICULARLY under the decks. Lie on a bunk and look under the deck for any signs of water damage or mould. If you don't see any (I would not take odds on it being clear) then turn a hose on the decks and go see the rest of the boat. Look at the deck as it dries, any leaking seams will still be wet and any bungs that have failed will still be wet too. If it has lived its life in a shed, expect extensive rebidding of railings, windows, anything mounted on the outside. Any leaks will show up after leaving it out in the rain for a few days.
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Old 03-19-2019, 06:38 AM   #17
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"I thought the natural cap made it look more salty."

A friend discovered big box store deck products would look great from 5 ft away, not reflective but good enough for him.
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Old 03-25-2019, 01:01 PM   #18
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nice

Hi, that is realy nice. how did you do this? I am looking to buy a grand banks Europe so very interested in the upgrades you do and see as needed.
thx
David
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