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Old 01-07-2008, 05:05 AM   #1
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Synthetic teak overlay

My 21 year old teak decks are pretty worn up front. I'm thinking about sanding them down flat to remove the ridges, etc. and gluing something like Plasteak or Flexiteak down over the existing deck. I've seen this stuff and it looks pretty good, and maintenance free. Anyone have any experience with a project like this?

http://www.plasteak.com/
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Old 01-07-2008, 10:08 AM   #2
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Synthetic teak overlay

Keith---

At least one person on the Grand Banks owners forum has put Flexiteak on his boat in place of the worn out teak decking. You might do a search of the archives on that forum* *http://www.grandbanksowners.com*

-- Edited by Marin at 12:08, 2008-01-07
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Old 01-07-2008, 09:59 PM   #3
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Synthetic teak overlay

Keith,

My new boat has real teak in the cockpit and FlexiTeek upstairs on my little flybridge deck. I can't yet comment much because, whilst the boat is now here in Hong Kong waters, I haven't yet taken delivery of her.

The builders allowed me to have the FlexiTeek put on prior to delivery as a customer-supplied and customer-installed item.

The good news is that the material looks authentic (for now at least) and I have already seen oil marks and boot-prints disappear without any effort by me to clean it. It feels authentic under foot. It's lighter in weight than the real stuff, and should last without much maintenance. Maybe I'll give you all an update after a year!

When I say it looks authentic, it will only resemble a slightly golden oiled teak deck. I'm not planning to do much oiling of my real teak deck, so time will tell how noticeable the colour difference will be between the two.

The slightly bad news is this: If your area to be covered is of a complicated shape, then chances are your local FlexiTeek dealer will be doing a lot of cutting and shaping and welding himself and, unless he is very practiced, you might end up with some slightly shoddy bits as I did. Most people wouldn't spot the bits that I am talking about. My guy will no doubt do even better with more practice (the product is very new out here, as it probbaly is everywhere), and he has in any case agreed to improve a couple of corners and welds after I take delivery of the boat.

Especially if you require a relatively simple shape, your FlexiTeek dealer should be able to have the whole thing made up at headquarters in Norway (or Sweden?) where they no doubt do a perfect job.... depending of course on the precision of the template that the local agent has to send them.

Mark
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:19 PM   #4
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Synthetic teak overlay

Mark---


You might want to consider not doing ANY oiling to your real teak. Contrary to some peoples' belief, teak has plenty of natural oil--- it doesn't need any more from you, even after 30-plus years. What the oil that you put on will do, however, is attract and hold dirt. This will hasten the deterioration of the surface wood cells and the dirty oil finish makes a great cutting compound when you walk on the wood, which wears away wood cells.

The absolute best thing you can do for an exterior teak deck is simply keep it clean using soap and water (salt water if your boat has a cored deck). And when you wash the deck, particularly if you use a soft brush or scrub pad (used LIGHTLY), always brush across the grain, never with it unless deck hardware forces you to do this in places. We use a basic string mop on our deck.

The upside is that your wood decking will last a long, long time. The downside (at least to some people) is that you have to be wiling to live with a silver-gray deck. So if you treat your natural teak deck correctly, it will not remain the same color as your plastic planking up above.

And do NOT use teak restorers or cleaners on your teak planking. These work exactly the same as sandpaper--- they remove the upper layers of gray wood cells, exposing the brown cells below, which when exposed to the weather then turn gray. So the owner uses the teak restorer again and more wood cells disappear. The only difference between teak restorers and cleaners and sandpaper is that sandpaper removes wood mechanically where the teak restorers remove it chemically.


-- Edited by Marin at 01:20, 2008-01-08
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Old 01-08-2008, 08:21 AM   #5
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RE: Synthetic teak overlay

I got a reply from the Flexiteak distributor in Texas today... he said that it wasn't a good idea to glue their product onto an existing teak deck. They suggested pulling up the deck and then applying it to fiberglass. He mentioned $35/sf. to install, but it isn't clear yet whether this includes their removing the old decking or not.

Heck, if I have to remove the old teak, I'm just going to fiberglass over what I have and be done with it.
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:12 PM   #6
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RE: Synthetic teak overlay

Thanks Marin. I'm gonna go au naturelle for as long as I can bear it. It's already going silvery now and looks very nice in my view (slightly irridescent even), so hopefully she will stay that way for a long time.
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:03 PM   #7
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Synthetic teak overlay

Mark-- Just keep it clean. We use Lemon Joy in salt water. I've seen Lemon Joy recommended a lot because it's one of the few detergents that makes good suds in cold water. If your boat does not have a wood-cored deck under the teak planking, or if the planking is glued down, not screwed down, you can use fresh water and detergent if you like.

We try to wash our main deck once a month (our flying bridge deck is under a cover virtually year round). There is a railroad yard next to our marina, and that plus the diesel soot put into the air by boats and just the general dirt that's in the air in and near a city, gets boats very dirty very fast in our marina.

About three times a year we "scrub" the deck. Which means we use a "doodlebug" aka 3M woven plastic pad VERY LIGHTLY on the teak, always across the grain, and with the same salt water- Lemon Joy solution. This gets up stuff the string mop doesn't have the "bite" to get, but it's very easy on the wood as long as you don't press hard. This treatment puts a tiny bit of brown back in the wood in places but it's gone in a week. We don't do it for the color, just to get the most stubborn dirt up periodically. Our deck is now 35 years old, and while it's not anywhere near perfect, it's surprisingly good for being that old and having been subjected to the California sun and the abuses of several previous owners before we trucked the boat north nine and a half years ago. (Hard to believe we've had the boat that long.....)
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Old 01-10-2008, 03:31 AM   #8
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Synthetic teak overlay

"if I have to remove the old teak, I'm just going to fiberglass over what I have and be done with it."


IF the deck is GRP all you will have to do is fill the old screw holes, epoxy , not Bondo.

To create a "no skid" mark the area with heavy pencil,, keeping waterways , deck fills ect clear.

Purchase coarse cotton screening , and after ironing the cotton smooth trace the pattern onto the cotton.

Roll a 2 part paint onto the entire area , thinly.The pattern will show thru.

Then lay the cotton down within the marked pattern , and roll another coat of 2 part paint on.

The cotton will absorb the paint . and if done right (low skill) the no skid will look similar to a Boston Whaler interior deck.

This is inexpensive and easy to repair if damaged , the sand in paint method sucks as its hard to get even , and sanding sand to repair is slow.

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Old 01-14-2008, 09:40 AM   #9
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RE: Synthetic teak overlay

I've not tried it, but it sounds pretty interesting.* It was suggested that Epsom Salts be sprinkled on the wet paint.* When the paint dries, the ES can be melted with water, leaving a non skid surface with the advantage of not being difficult to prepare (sand down) for a repeat coat.

If anyone tries it (I suggest a small test panel first), I'd like to get your opinion.

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Old 01-15-2008, 03:07 AM   #10
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Synthetic teak overlay

The problem is usually cost.

To get a nice uniform surface a wet coat of paint is rolled on and at least an inch of dry sand gently poured on. After 2 days for the paint to dry , the sand is brushed or washed off, & nice uniform surface left.

Most of the sprinkle on boat stuff is ground wallnut or similar shells.

EZ to sand off , but hard to get nice and uniform.

I have seen folks use this , the edges of walkways were more heavily covered , and the center less.

Works better for bare feet , any pattern looks "on purpose."

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Old 09-25-2016, 11:28 AM   #11
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Just curious...anybody put synthetic teak on their decks?
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Old 09-25-2016, 12:20 PM   #12
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Synthetic teak overlay

My dock mate has an old Tolly that he just had the fake teak put on. Originally, the deck was non-skid fiberglass. Too soon to see how it wears but it looks good. Of course, now the rest of the boat looks terrible in comparison.
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Old 09-25-2016, 01:31 PM   #13
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This world is synthetic enough.

What's wrong w painted decks.
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Old 09-25-2016, 01:37 PM   #14
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This world is synthetic enough
Your boat made of wood? Touche!
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Old 09-25-2016, 02:03 PM   #15
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What's wrong w painted decks.
Also looking into that, but not relevant to this thread.
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Old 09-25-2016, 02:51 PM   #16
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A friend with a West Bay 58 has synthetic teak in the whole of the aft cockpit and on the swim grid. It looks good, but is far too hot to walk on barefoot in the sunshine. This is in the South Coast of BC, where temps don't rise to the heights many of you see in warmer climates.
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:22 PM   #17
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A friend with a West Bay 58 has synthetic teak in the whole of the aft cockpit and on the swim grid. It looks good, but is far too hot to walk on barefoot in the sunshine. This is in the South Coast of BC, where temps don't rise to the heights many of you see in warmer climates.
Nearly three years ago our patio had many samples of synthetic and real teak for us to test. Heat and grip were the real challenges. We just couldn't get comfortable with any of the synthetics.
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:43 PM   #18
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A friend with a West Bay 58 has synthetic teak in the whole of the aft cockpit and on the swim grid. It looks good, but is far too hot to walk on barefoot in the sunshine. This is in the South Coast of BC, where temps don't rise to the heights many of you see in warmer climates.
Good point...further reading; Hot Decks - Inside Practical Sailor Blog Article
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Old 09-25-2016, 03:52 PM   #19
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Just curious...anybody put synthetic teak on their decks?
Take a look at our website in the signature.
We added DIY syn teak decks and really like them.
Photos and how to...contacts etc
FRP decks were hard to keep looking good
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Old 09-25-2016, 04:02 PM   #20
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Nearly three years ago our patio had many samples of synthetic and real teak for us to test. Heat and grip were the real challenges. We just couldn't get comfortable with any of the synthetics.
New whiz-bang (more expensive I'm sure) stuff coming out:

FLEXITEEK 2G - Flexiteek
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