Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-17-2013, 12:54 PM   #21
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARoss View Post
I have found that Starbrite Hull cleaner works really well on that A/C drain stain, as well as a good cleaner for our "Pamlico Mustache" on the bow from all the tannins in our water.
Starbrite Hull cleaner contains oxalic acid. I suspect the stain has just been there so long that it's permanent. It's only about thre inches long so I can live with it.
__________________
Advertisement

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 12:58 AM   #22
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar


 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,501
Ron I don't think your AC drain stain is rust so I wouldn't expect Whink to remove it.
One quick thread drift please, Ron what was the name of the resturant in Sanford that you liked? I think it was Italian.
__________________

HopCar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 06:27 AM   #23
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Hollerbach's Willow Tree Cafe'

http://www.willowtreecafe.com/

It's German food.

Two or three nights a week they have a really good two piece German band playing.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 07:08 PM   #24
JAT
Guru
 
JAT's Avatar
 
Country: US
Vessel Name: Just a Tinch
Vessel Model: Gulfstar 44 MC
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post

I looked into that Spotless Stainless stuff...gets good reviews and is based on citric acid.

I bought some at the St. Pete boat show...tried it out...it worked! I ordered two more quarts. It works as advertised.... If the rust is heavy a little rubbing at the end helps...but it is good stuff!!
JAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 08:29 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
xfedex's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: usa
Vessel Name: Fluke
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 131
Flitz has worked well for me... cleans metal and fiberglass.
WD - 40 cleans grease and handprints on stainless appliances like nobody's business.
xfedex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2013, 02:48 AM   #26
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar


 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,501
Thanks Ron. I'm going fishing up that way in a couple of weeks.
HopCar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2013, 07:57 AM   #27
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by xfedex View Post
WD - 40 cleans grease and handprints on stainless appliances like nobody's business.
Perhaps, but it leaves an oily film that will attract dust and dirt. Ordinary cleaners like spray nine or simple green will clean appliances just as well and not leave an oily film.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2013, 12:49 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
xfedex's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: usa
Vessel Name: Fluke
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 131
WD-40 is a solvent. Next to SS cleaners sold at appliance stores it out cleans =with no oily build up
xfedex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2013, 11:33 AM   #29
Guru
 
Carolena's Avatar
 
City: DC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carolena II
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32/34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 605
We've used Spotless Stainless on the sailboat, and it really does work. No issues with the teak or hull. The only tricks are that you need to keep in mind are (i) use it when it is relatively warm out (at least 70, as I recall, but works even better if it is warmer), and (ii) don't let it dry out. Our process has been to put some in a cup then paint it on with a disposable foam brush. Let it sit for 30 mins while occassionaly misting with some water in a spray bottle (good time to enjoy a beverage of choice), then rinse off with a hose. Really bad stains may take more than one application, or some rubbing. Once you are done, I suggest following up with a polish/protectant. You can use fitz as other suggested, Woody Wax (as we use) or pretty much any wax. We've suggested Spotless to friends and have heard back positive results from them, as well.
Carolena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2013, 05:26 PM   #30
Boat Bum
 
Alfton's Avatar
 
City: Kemah, Texas
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Traveling Star
Vessel Model: Pilgrim 40
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 164
I use the stuff I got at the boat show and it is great

Prism Polish - Cleans, Polishes and Protects All Metals
__________________
John Allison
Pilgrim 40 Hull #18
Kemah, Texas
Alfton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2013, 06:34 PM   #31
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,786
Prism Polish is great for restoring a badly rusted or corroded item, including glass, silver and plexiglass. A lttle goes a long way so while on the surface it's expensive but total cost of ownership is very low; we use it for all kinds of things and are only about 2/3 of the way through a jar we bought 4 (5?) years ago.

For routine maintenance item of choice is Collinite Metal Wax which removes almost all but the worst surface rust on stainless (and from fiberglass/paint/gelcoat too) and keeps it from returning for a long time. I think we had every stainless cleaning miracle product there is on the boat (we have a lot of stainless) though I have given most of it away. Have also tried Flitz when my local store was out of Collinite and it seems to be very similar. Again, a little of each goes a long way. I got turned on to Collinite by a guy who maintained a lot of fancy yachts when we spent a few weeks once at Turnberry I$le in Aventura. He gave it the boat washer-detailer's ultimate accolade "Look man, I gotta lotta boats to do I don't want to spend a bunch of time doing the metal if I don't have to."

If you really want to keep 'em clean and shiny a long time, after cleaning, apply a sealer like Rejex or something like Collinite Fleetwax. A detailer did that to my boat once and for the following year involving alot of ocean and brackish cruising all I did was wash off with water and wipe.

You Pamlico/Neuse River/ICW mustache guys should get your hull cleaned and sealed with Rejex sometime. Then just hose off the hull after a trip, at most a very soft brush and water. Will last a year, usually two depending how much you use the boat. And the hull will look great too if it is cleaned correctly first.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 12:43 AM   #32
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: Somewhere
Country: , Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer sedan 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,868
Do NOT use steel wool or you will have a real mess.

Bronze wool would work although it appears to be hard to find now compared to a bunch of years ago at least.
C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 02:10 AM   #33
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,564
Quote:
Originally Posted by C lectric View Post
Do NOT use steel wool or you will have a real mess.

Bronze wool would work although it appears to be hard to find now compared to a bunch of years ago at least.
Could depend on the grade used.
I had success with Autosol polish and 000 grade steel wool on very neglected aluminum/aluminium strips, I think it worked on stainless tubing too.
0000 grade is used to clean and polish french polished antique furniture, so it should be ok for stainless steel.
I`m sure the coarse grades, like for pots and pans,would be a disaster.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 09:28 AM   #34
Veteran Member
 
Soundwiz's Avatar
 
City: Austin
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Spanish Moon
Vessel Model: Roughwater 44' Pilot House
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 53
Diluted muriatic acid does a great job of cleaning rust spots off Gel coat. It's also great for cleaning barnacles out of intake sea strainers, and filters without fogging up the plastic canisters.

Dopp
Soundwiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 10:30 AM   #35
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Could depend on the grade used.
I had success with Autosol polish and 000 grade steel wool on very neglected aluminum/aluminium strips, I think it worked on stainless tubing too.
0000 grade is used to clean and polish french polished antique furniture, so it should be ok for stainless steel.
I`m sure the coarse grades, like for pots and pans,would be a disaster.
Any grade of steel wool will leave small particles of steel behind. When these particles of steel get wet, they will rust. Now you have an even bigger problem.

Steel wool is fine for furniture making and finishing as long as a water based finish is not used. If you use steel wool on furniture and then apply a water based finish, you will have rust just as you will if you use it on your boat.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 10:40 AM   #36
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar


 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,501
I agree with Ron on this one. Steel wool should never be brought aboard a boat. Tiny bits of it get on the fiberglass and you have little rust spots everywhere. It's just not worth it. Bronze wool works well and any good marine store should have it in stock.
HopCar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 11:16 AM   #37
Veteran Member
 
sailtones's Avatar
 
City: Tivat
Country: Montenegro
Vessel Name: Nostra Signora
Vessel Model: Marine Trader CHB 34DC
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 89
Having worked on yachts that require both the ss and the brass to be always shining to the highest gleam, I can say that any light abrasive polish on the market will do the job. However, there is one more important element, it's grease, elbow grease on a regular basis. Only way to keep it clean, is to keep it clean.
Having said that, you can use the acidic type of product on rust streaked stainless or dull/green brass, but be super careful with the varnish, paint work or anything else that might come in contact with it.
If you want to use a acid based product, dont mess around, just mix up a solution of oxalic acid and water. Again, be careful with everything around that it may come is contact with!!
But although it will get the rust off no problem, it will not polish. Then its back to the light abrasive polish, soft cloth and elbow grease to make it shine!
__________________
Tony
sailtones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 11:24 PM   #38
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: Somewhere
Country: , Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer sedan 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,868
Although it has now been covered on this one I'll not leave it.
Do NOT use steel wool.
It is not ok almost anywhere on a boat.

Ron & Hop Car are dead on.

Steel wool will leave tiny bits all over the place including the decks. You may not be able to see them. When seawater, or any water, hits the specks they will rust and stain whatever the contact.

I learned this many years ago although I was lucky, it was at someone elses expense.
He was not happy.

There are lots of good suggestions here. Personally I'd start with a polish such as Flitz or a good chrome polish which do not use acids. Even a good wax, particularily the cleaner waxes, will do a good job.
If that isn't doing the job then try a stronger cleaner but only after trying the least nasty products.
Old tooth brushes work well for confined areas. I've got a situation where I'm going to buy an inexpensive electric tooth brush and try that. The old tooth brush is working but is SLOW, to slow.

If you have a lot to do a buffing wheel on a drill will help but even just applying a good dose of a cleaner or wax and then use a rag pulling on both ends and sawing back and forth can speed the process on larger pieces.
C lectric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2013, 11:49 PM   #39
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,564
Ron,Hopcar, C lectric, I respect you guys know your stuff, but I really did not see any aftermath from using the steel wool. Maybe I`m unobservant, maybe it`s because I did a final thorough Autosol polish, using cloth. And maybe I won`t do it again, just in case.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 09:05 AM   #40
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by C lectric View Post
........... Old tooth brushes work well for confined areas. I've got a situation where I'm going to buy an inexpensive electric tooth brush and try that. The old tooth brush is working but is SLOW, to slow.............
The beauty of the Spotless Stainless product is that it works without any mechanical action on your part. No toothbrushes, etc. I wouldn't think of using it on rails and bimini top supports, but as I posted above, if you have phillips screw heads with rust in the recess, or other intricate areas where rubbing or buffing is difficult, this is a greart product to use in these areas.
__________________

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012