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Old 05-03-2013, 04:39 AM   #1
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Storm Windows

I searched through old threads regarding others opinion of reverse slanting windows in regard to water shedding.
I did find some great info, as well as some good laughs.

My boat has the "wannabe" windows, and I love the looks, the shade from the overhang, the non-reflectiveness, and how it sheds/avoids rain. Another bonus is the decreased chance of someone falling onto a window when on the foredeck.

As far as I know all other models of the same boat had conventional windows. They only made a few motor sailer versions and perhaps only this one has the wannabe windows to give extra room on the foredeck.

However - at least in my case, I still a bit concerned about knocking them out in heavy seas. Although the boat has a high bow for a 30 footer, it has a flush foredeck. This is great to shed small amounts water, although if a big wave rolled over my bow I'm sure any type of window would be knocked out. So far in waves up to 10 foot, the bow hasn't buried and I just get spray hitting the windows at a downward angle. Still, I tend to duck at the helm when a heavy spray hits.

I have thought about making up storm covers, out of 3/4" ply with a small single inner window, which I can keep onboard for emergency use. These could be fixed in place if unexpected heavy seas are encountered (preferably before the windows are knocked out). They would need to be attached them securely, quickly and safely in rough seas. Perhaps from the inside.

Has anyone seen anything like this?
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Old 05-03-2013, 04:57 AM   #2
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Aus Can,
A lot of the smaller ( 40 to 60 ft) ocean crossers have storm windows, Usually made out of lexan so that the windows are still usable.About 12 to 15 mm lexan is more than enough.
Unless you are contempating doing a Bass Strait crossing I don't think you should have to worry to much. Mind you down your way you wan't to keep a good eye on the weather.
I think it is on the Kady Krogen site they actually sell fittings for affixing storm windows. Just checked Kady Krogen web site and they are in the ships store.
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Old 05-03-2013, 05:36 AM   #3
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Lexan storm port covers are fine , but only as strong as the cabin structure there bolted to.
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:23 AM   #4
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Thanks Benn,
The KK fitting looks good; 12 fittings = $468 + cost of lexan + time. Hmm - maybe there's a few other higher piority items first.

Yes FF - I'm sure a big enough wave would just remove my cabin completely, although with the high flush bow deck, there isn't as much surface area at the front as most boats.

The main concern around here is crossing Backstairs Passage on the way to Kangaroo Island. It can be a wild bit of water at times, even when the weather is reasonable. Other times it is like glass. Often we get the swell coliding from 2 different directions and it gets ugly.

I'm heading over in about 10 days. My first offshore cruise. I'll be watching the weather and wave reports closely.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:04 AM   #5
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Wannabe windows? Lol pfft. Can't wait to see what mine is called when " they " find out I chucked in a VE commodore windscreen. Once piece, Sika her in to prefabbed rebates and wa la.

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Old 05-03-2013, 09:30 AM   #6
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Quote:
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Lexan storm port covers are fine , but only as strong as the cabin structure there bolted to.
Yes
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:15 AM   #7
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He's ready to install a nice set of wannabe windows now.
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:39 AM   #8
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AusCan,

I don't think you really have anything to worry about. My Willard has never had anything but light spray on the plastic windows. It's as though the designer knew high strength windows wouldn't be necessary.

Consider our boats. They are short w a lot of buoyancy. Big waves (so far) have lifted the bow of Willy up so quickly that no solid water comes aboard. If the weight of a boat is concentrated amidships the ends are free to rise and fall w very little resistance. This produces a motion that is sometimes refered to as "hobby horsing". The hh motion can get very tiresome after a while.

Re post #6 he would probably have been better off w/o the roof overhang.

Some breaking seas WILL come over the bow but I've seen a lot of seas and not had one aboard yet.

But on the downside the fwd slanting windows will get blown our more easily.
Something to consider is a structure on the foredeck a bit like a Portuguese bridge about 6" tall. Something to slow down the rushing water may be of benefit.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:39 AM   #9
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Yes Eric, I had plenty of hobby horsing on my first day out in 6ft+ messy swell. I guess it has its advantages over stabbing into a wave.

Hendo- I'm sure looking forward to seeing the Axe continue to take shape. Along with the VE commodore windscreen, are you considering a roo-bar as well?
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:13 PM   #10
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Yes
Certainly, without the lexan (or whatever the covers are made of) the damage (flying broken glass) could have been far worse. Better yet, don't go out in conditions where seas could board the boat. Ten foot waves at a short period can be dangerous for far bigger boats than what most of us have. If you find yourself with a sudden, unexpected onset of big seas your not going to have time to fit storm windows anyway, you will have much more important things to do. Watch the weather carefully and avoid big seas...............Arctic Traveller
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:17 PM   #11
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All the Coot's windows have bolt "holes" for attaching storm windows. Don't have storm windows, however. Not needed in my protected waters.

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Old 05-03-2013, 12:40 PM   #12
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I would be more concerned about the structure support than the windows. Especially if it mostly windows like shown in the picture below, also it appear the wood/support was not in the good of shape.

I have added plex a glass storm windows to the salon side windows to protect from the rain/wind, and hold in the heat as the windows are single pane. With the addition of the plex a glass we have not condensation, drafts and the boat is quieter and warmer. Many boats have rot under/around the windows, so I would check the support structure first.
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:17 PM   #13
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I'll just clarify my intentions -
Sticking to protected waters, means I dont leave the marina. The immediate area (within 50 miles) is semi-protected, meaning usually 3-10 foot swells. Occasionally, I would like to venture outside the gulf, but only when the weather is right.
Even with a great forecast and staying in the gulf, I still would want to take all precautions possible, so this is one I am considering. Like an Epirb, - hopefully it will never be required.

BTW - my present windows are laminated 1/4" glass, so no danger of broken pieces flying in the cabin.

I'll gently feel my way around for a while before deciding if this is worth persuing.
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:39 PM   #14
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Hendo- I'm sure looking forward to seeing the Axe continue to take shape. Along with the VE commodore windscreen, are you considering a roo-bar as well?
Hahaha roo bar hahahaha ahhhh man I LOLd then. Can you picture that? Hahaha too funny. Gees I needed that hahahaha. Thanks!

If I did go a roo bar id have to chuck on a set of wing mirrors and a rear view mirror as well and possibly some indicators haha

Still working out the design of putting in a windscreen. Curves are mainly the issue. Tho if it were easy I'm sure a lot more would have an automotive windscreen in it. Another thing is width and hull flex. Jury is still out on this option

Thanks again for the laugh. Sooo needed it :-D

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Old 05-04-2013, 03:56 AM   #15
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Hendo, I think the roo bar idea not so way off. It would be a good place to put your rocket launchers. (Rod holders for the uninitiated). Also to mount spotlights on, plus horn or two, maybe GPS antenna, and even ultimately your radar, if desired. Ie, roo bar = targa frame.

As to front windows...bit worried re using a curved car one, it would be a bit narrow, anyway. What about three or four, or maybe even five flat polycarbonate screens, and it's really good for at least the middle one to be opening, hinged at the top. I love our middle window being able to do that and let air through.
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:24 AM   #16
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Im tending to agree with you on that Pete.
I'll probs do 3 large windows with that centre flip tho i really like the look of the Pilothouse forward slant types!
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:34 AM   #17
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Im tending to agree with you on that Pete.
I'll probs do 3 large windows with that centre flip tho i really like the look of the Pilothouse forward slant types!
You could have both Hendo. Just split the middle window about 1/3rd way up from the bottom, hinge the top bit, and leave the bottom part fixed. It would mean a sub-frame a third way up, but I doubt that would matter, not compared to the practical advantage of that air flow option.
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:49 AM   #18
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I saw the pilothouse windows on a small ( 60' ) North Sea oil platform supply vessel. Lexan with a gasket all around the edge made of medium soft fuel hose. The cushion added to the flexibility of the unit . The Vessel,s Master said the edges would crack over time with out the gasket. They laid in a bottom mounted groove with two movable holding mounts on top. Like to have a set on my GB 49.
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:28 AM   #19
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From what I've heard Lexan or any polycarbononate shrinks & grows with temperature, so this must be allowed for in ther fit.

After considering what Ive read, I'm kinda leaning towards a temporary way to batten down the hatches rather than something that looks pretty. I'm thinking 3/4" ply covering the whole area from deck to roof, to give maximum strength. Just a small window in the middle. The 3 pieces of ply could be easily stored below deck and hopefully never used.
Just beefing up the glass alone may not increase the overall strength much if the current window frames aren't built to take the extra pressure.

Hendo - my centre window flips up for ventilation, or access if needed. Good for yelling at the anchor boy.
BTW - I had a good chuckle imagining the finished Axe with full accessories. If I had photoshop on my laptop at work here, I'd do a preview pic.
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:37 AM   #20
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Im tending to agree with you on that Pete.
I'll probs do 3 large windows with that centre flip tho i really like the look of the Pilothouse forward slant types!
Kinda like this?
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