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Old 05-10-2016, 08:46 AM   #1
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Stanchion Hardware Search - Please Help!

I have a 1982 Bristol trawler, 42'. We have removed all of our stanchions and toprail, and have now refinished the cap rails. Some of the flat head machine screws we removed in the process are not reusable. I cannot find anything like them anywhere! They appear to be 5/16" diameter, but not quite; or #8 metric, but not quite. Neither of those sizes (new) will sit flush in the stanchion base plate b/c the heads are far too large, nor will they fit the threads on the tapped plate under the cap rail. The original screws are 1-1/2" long, brass or bronze. They are definitely NOT standard (at least, anymore), and custom made replacements are $7.75 each (OK) and require a 4-week lead time (not OK). Alternatively, I could have all the stanchions re-bored, the cap rail holes re-drilled, and the inside plates re-tapped. I would much rather find the darned machine screws! Where did these odd fasteners come from? More importantly, how can I get some?
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Old 05-10-2016, 08:52 AM   #2
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Fastenal or similar? https://www.fastenal.com/
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Old 05-10-2016, 09:05 AM   #3
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I have tried them, McMaster-Carr, etc. and everyone has the standard sizes--all with heads too large and threads that are a little too large in diameter as well. Is there anywhere to get original fasteners used by Bristol?
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Old 05-10-2016, 09:21 AM   #4
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Try Jamestown Distributers but I'm with RT on this. Go into the store not the website and talk with the countermen face to face at Fastenal. FYI, I've been a satisfied customer of theirs for over a decade and have never waited more than 4 days for anything, regardless how rare.
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Old 05-10-2016, 09:40 AM   #5
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OK, I will do both of those. Thank you.
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Old 05-10-2016, 10:01 AM   #6
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Have you tried talking to your local Hamilton Marine?
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Old 05-10-2016, 10:27 AM   #7
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What is the exact diameter? How many threads per inch?
This is really strange. I have an antique brass bed that is put together with 1/4- 24 tpi machine screws. This is no longer a standard size but it used to be.

I'll be interested to know what you figure out.
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Old 05-10-2016, 11:45 AM   #8
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Yes, Hamilton Marine was one of my many stops. They weren't much help, offering the same standard 5/16" x 1-1/2" with the large head and suggesting that I re-bore and re-tap everything.
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Old 05-10-2016, 12:11 PM   #9
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No fun , but I would bite the bullet and re drill and re tap to a common US size.

These will need to be re bedded every so often so make the future EZ on your self.
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Old 05-10-2016, 12:11 PM   #10
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The diameter is 0.311" and the diameter of the head is 0.437". There are 18 threads per inch. But a 5/16-18 is too large to fit into the hole through the cap rail or the nut in the fiberglass below.
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Old 05-10-2016, 12:18 PM   #11
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FF, thanks for the suggestion. I am thinking it may be the way to go, but I have never done it. Is it easy enough for a newbie to do it?
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Old 05-10-2016, 01:03 PM   #12
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Once you determine the correct thread diameter and pitch (this should be easy with a thread gauge and bolt sizer), Chuck the bolts in a drill and hold up against a grinder to reduce the head size to something that will work.

5/16ths has a major diameter of .3125 so that must be it. Standard Pitch's range from 18 to 24 to 32.
As mentioned, you might need to run a tap though there..
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Old 05-10-2016, 05:35 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seasidemom View Post
FF, thanks for the suggestion. I am thinking it may be the way to go, but I have never done it. Is it easy enough for a newbie to do it?
Why don't you ask the people at Hamilton who suggested it in the first place? Lot of expertise in that organization.
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Old 05-11-2016, 06:58 AM   #14
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The only hard part of drilling a SS part is holding it as its drilled.

A drill press is nice , but a 3/8 slow speed hand drill with the part held in a vice works just fine.

Pressure and a sharp (new?) drill bit is a help, even a drill bit held in a hand brace will work if you can be above the work and lean hard on the brace.

Tapping holes requires a drill bit that fits the MINOR diameter of the threads .

Look up what is required for a 75% fit and simply purchase that drill when you purchase the tap you will use.

It may be a 32 size or a number or letter drill bit.

Oil helps the tap process as does removing the tap every so often.

After the first couple you will be an expert.

Dont forget to clean the oil before using some sealing goop.

I prefer Dolphinite as its the easiest to take down and clean for the next rebedding exercise..
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Old 05-11-2016, 08:06 AM   #15
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Thank you so much for all the information. I appreciate the generosity on this forum!
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Old 05-11-2016, 11:24 AM   #16
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Sure it's not an M8 x 1.25 or M8 x 1 thread ?
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Old 05-11-2016, 11:59 AM   #17
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Greetings,
Ms. ssm. I cannot see any vessel manufacturer using a fitting that was not a standard size (SAE or metric). Before you go to the trouble and frustration of re-tapping everything, you must confirm the existing bolt size regardless of what any "counter person" thinks it may be. Forget about the head size for the time being. It's the thread configuration and the potential of re-tapping that will cause headaches. There HAS to be something that readily fits.

If, as you say, the nut portion in the hull is just that, a nut and not a solid plate, attempts at re-tapping could be a quick journey to hell IF the nut starts spinning halfway through a re-tap to a different thread.

Take several bolts into a good fastener center as suggested and have at it.
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Old 05-11-2016, 12:08 PM   #18
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What about going to a pan head screw that would cover the hole in the stantion base. If you can find one with the correct thread size, I would not be concerned about having the screw flush. As far as bedding, I love using butyl tape. It stretches if the stantion has any give to it and is removable if you need to rebed (probably will not ever be needed with butyl). You do have to tighten it several times as the butyl squeezes out, but it is worth it.
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Old 05-11-2016, 03:32 PM   #19
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No one would use screw threads that do not exist, why would a builder raise their costs? This sounds very strange that the thread size is unique to this boat.
Tapping new threads, if the original thread is a close match will be easy. Oil the tap, you go like 1/2 to 1/4 turns, and you back off to clear the chips..

If it is just a tapped support plate AND NO LOOSE NUTS.
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Old 05-12-2016, 06:29 AM   #20
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Ms. ssm. I cannot see any vessel manufacturer using a fitting that was not a standard size (SAE or metric). B

Many Bristol 42 were sold for "owner completion".

A factory finished boat will be mostly OTS material from the local distributor , a home brew may have anything!
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