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Old 08-04-2016, 02:54 PM   #21
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Hopcar's suggestion looks like a great Quick resolution. Ask yourself if you went to look at a boat and saw a mismatched stanchion repair, would you question how the owner addressed other issues with the boat? If you plan on removing all the welded base plates and replacing with socket type, then it makes sense. It would be a good interim repair to get you through the season,(provided you don't have to shorten the stanchion). I have found that many times the Interim Repair does not get addressed till another failure occurs. Just something to think about.
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Old 08-05-2016, 07:12 AM   #22
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Good idea to investigate all your stanchions. Remove all and hang upside down on a board with holes in it. Take to your tame TIG welder who will weld all of them from underneath. Price should be reasonable because you brought it right to his shop and mounted the work where he can work on it comfortably.
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Old 08-05-2016, 08:24 AM   #23
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GURRYMAN, Shoalwaters,
Agreed with your observations and concerns. What i see on my boat is a very long distance from the broken stanchion up to the top of the rail. Didn't get that perspective in the pictures. The first stanchion up on the rear deck was broken when we bought the boat. Same on both sides of the boat. SO what i am thinking and have resolved to determine is if the slip on base will add any stability and strength by spreading the forces out over an inch vs the 1/8" or less that will be provided in a weld. Probably more like 1/16". So that is the consideration I am giving for this type of repair. This will give me the remainder of the season to evaluate the repair. If I am not satisfied with it i can take the rails off this winter do as suggested have them ALL re-welded the same and re-install. I can match the first two stanchions on each side of the boat for now and not be so obviously repaired. Thanks for the input, certainly worth considering. Cheers
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Old 08-05-2016, 08:59 AM   #24
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If you want to increase the strength at the stanchion base, sleeve the lower part of the stanchion with larger diameter stainless steel tube. The sleeved tube could go part way up the stanchion or almost all the way to the top rail. The second and larger diameter weld at the base of each gate stanchion will provide the additional strength for your higher railing.
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Old 08-07-2016, 08:15 AM   #25
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Update for the planned repair. At this time I plan to use the slip on 316 stainless base bedded with butyl tape.
1. Looks like it will be at least as strong as original design.
2. Upon inspection of interior below deck. To remove the hardware securing the entire rail the headliner and teak support frames and accents would all have to be removed in the aft stateroom. That's not something I am prepared to do to enable removal of the entire rail.
Yes, having two stanchions look differently is not most desirable. it for me FAR out weighs the prospect of tearing out the interior of the stateroom.
As to concerns of what this kind of repair may suggest about other repairs or maintenance I will leave all of that to the extremely detailed maintenance log. I log everything down to ER checks, lamp replacements. It's an old boat but the suggestion does have merit and thanks for making the point.
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Old 08-08-2016, 05:07 AM   #26
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"Yes, having two stanchions look differently is not most desirable"

If the boat matches P&S many bases are far more suitable to clip fenders to.
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Old 08-08-2016, 08:08 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"Yes, having two stanchions look differently is not most desirable"

If the boat matches P&S many bases are far more suitable to clip fenders to.
What is P&S.?
The stanchions are hidden by the skirting around the deck anyway so if you get to see them, you were probably invited aboard. There are a lot of more interesting things to look at around here. Like the margarita mixer for example. And of course the LAVA lamps!.
Thanks again for all perspectives
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Old 08-08-2016, 08:15 AM   #28
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Fog, yes looked at that sleeve initially sleeve would challenge hardware install. Looks doable but tight. To remove the rail completely will require removing the teak supporting structure and headliner in my stateroom. Sounds simple, looks like nightmare to me. Do not intend to create another project. Still very good method of repair were it less invasive to the interior.
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Old 08-08-2016, 09:19 AM   #29
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"What is P&S.?"

Port & Starboard AKA Left & Right .

OnlineMetals.com has SS tubing with a variety of ID and OD that might be used to beef up a stanchion.
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Old 08-31-2016, 11:32 AM   #30
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UPDATE. Well the old adage for carpenters and the like, "measure twice cut once" comes to mind here. I procured all the necessary materials summoned some courage from the cowardly Lion and dove in! Well not too deep, somehow I misread the calipers I was using to measure the OD of the rail tubing. What i read was 0.872. 7/8 rail base would measure 0.875 so.. perfect slide it on. Well not so fast. the base would not slide on nor could i "make it fit". SO of course I had taken the calipers back home, what would I need them for during the install? The following week I returned with them to prove the rail base was undersized. Well it was not. The rail had grown to 0.992 That will not fit inside a hole that is only .875 least not this time. Maybe i should get new glasses. I contacted the supplier where I ordered the Rail bases and got 1" bases on the way. Thank goodness for retail suppliers who want to retain my bussiness! It was totally my fault for being half blind and partially dumb. Please do not debate or refute the last part. Ego could not stand it right now. Maybe later when I am finished with the repairs.
Labor Day Weekend is upon us! Safe Holiday for those who participate. See you on the water!
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Old 08-31-2016, 12:49 PM   #31
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Dave! You're the PITA who ordered the wrong size bases! Is Victor taking care of you?
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Old 08-31-2016, 01:32 PM   #32
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It was me! It was me! SOMEONE has to be that guy. The sun was in my eye. Honest it was. Maybe it was the rain. Can't remember, eyes and memory going bad.
Haven't heard from him yet probably be on my door step when I get home. Won't get back to the project until after the holiday weekend anyway. The other items are installed and fit perfectly. Guess there was only one size... fits most, you know.
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Old 08-31-2016, 03:03 PM   #33
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Maybe it was the margarita maker!

As to the stanchion, I'm a bit late to the party, but wanted to share a similar experience. We had a stanchion base break in the exact same way when a boat rafted to us hit it when a large wake came through the anchorage (we've gotten much larger fenders since then). Our stanchion wasn't a perfect 90 degrees, like yours, so the sleeve/base option was out. Like your boat, removing the whole rail (this was the bow) would have been a major project, at least as to reaching the bolts for at least one or two of the stanchions. We ultimately had a friend bring his welder down to the dock to reweld the base. It didn't come out perfect, and required some grinding and polishing, but it really isn't noticable if you are not looking for it. Unfortunately for us, I also had to do some fiberglass repair. All is now done, except for the gelcoat, which I'll finish when the weather cools down a bit this fall. Best of luck and have a great long weekend!

EDIT - we also bedded with the butyl tape. I had some from a big box store that we tried on a prior repair on our sailboat and it was horrible. I subsequently ordered some from Compass Marine (RC/MaineSail) and his stuff is the real deal. We used it to rebed every fitting on our sailboat, and have been using it exclusively as we work through rebedding things on the current boat (including some window frames). No leaks, easy to work with, and never hardens. the only downside is that you will find it oozing out for a few weeks after the install (particularly when it gets hot), but it is easy to remove so no big deal.
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Old 08-31-2016, 04:32 PM   #34
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Can I get a link to find that good butyl tape? Many thanks
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Old 08-31-2016, 04:51 PM   #35
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Not sure if HopCar carries it, but if not, you can order it here. Two rolls was enough to do our entire sailboat, and we still have most of a roll leftover. Luckily, it doesn't go bad with age. ***Buy Bed-It Butyl Tape*** Photo Gallery by Compass Marine How To at pbase.com
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Old 08-31-2016, 05:16 PM   #36
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Thanks so much!
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:18 PM   #37
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I haven't got the tape. I've heard that Maine Sail sells the best. I'm still a 5200 guy but I'd stock the tape if I could figure out who makes it.
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:24 AM   #38
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GMARR that's where I got it.
Compass Marine.
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:32 AM   #39
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I've been waiting to order some and since I close on my new to me boat tonight, I finally placed the order since some leaks are in the project list!!!!
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:35 AM   #40
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Cool, Good luck with the repairs. You get what looks like a lifetime supply of the tape for less than 50 bucks. I haven't used it yet but others who use it rate it well.
Dave.
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