Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-16-2013, 12:37 PM   #1
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Sealant Shelf Life

Products like 3M 5200 and 4200 keep fine until opened. Once opened, the entire tube seems to cure in just a day or two, wasting the remainder of the tube.

I seem to recall someone posting that this curing could be slowed down by refrigerating or freezing the opened tube. If you've tried this, did it work? Any other suggestions for prolonging the shelf life of an opened tube of sealant?
__________________
Advertisement

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 01:23 PM   #2
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,711
And I would very much like to know this too. I've tried everything I could think of and nothing seems to work. Noth'in like a $12 tube of the best stuff for a little dab of high tech goo. What a waste. More so the goo than the money.
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 01:58 PM   #3
Guru
 
Shoalwaters's Avatar
 
City: Rodney Bay Lagoon
Country: St. Lucia, West Indies
Vessel Name: "Dragon Lady"
Vessel Model: DeFever 41
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 681
Yes, refrigerating 5200 and similar goo works. Can't speak for freezing it - probably a bad idea. I keep opened tubes of sealant in the door of my refrigerator and they last for months. Squeeze the stuff right up to the top of the tube before screwing on the cap - don't leave an air gap in there. If you use the little screw-on tapered nozzles that come with each tube (cut to the size of hole required), don't throw them away. Unscrew and put aside for a couple of weeks, then extract the tapered sausage of cured goop with a metal hook - Voila!
__________________
Mike
If all else fails, read the instructions
If it ain't broke, don't fix it
Shoalwaters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 02:03 PM   #4
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Yep... I can also say it keeps fine in our freezer. I have a ziplok bag of three or four tubes in the door tray of the freezer at home and on the boat. Just remove the cap of cured goo and off you go.

Tom-
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 02:07 PM   #5
Guru
 
Capn Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 899
We've been keeping ours in the freezer to help preserve it for years. I don't mean it lasts for years. It will last a long time and doesn't seem to affect the caulk. Works for all kinds. Chuck
__________________
Blogs
Beach House
Sea Trek
Capn Chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 02:09 PM   #6
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Thanks. Now how long between the time you take it out of the freezer and the time is can be used?
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 02:09 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
jeffnick's Avatar
 
City: Spartanburg, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Big Duck
Vessel Model: '72 Land-N-Sea
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 425
One More Time Around: Taming the Tube - 3M 4200 and 5200 -
jeffnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 02:39 PM   #8
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,188
I've had tubes last for months by just recapping them and zipping up in a ziploc bag and putting in a drawer. I've been surprised they lasted as long as they did. Maybe it's a UV thing and being is a drawer helps?
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 03:04 PM   #9
Guru
 
Capn Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 899
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
Thanks. Now how long between the time you take it out of the freezer and the time is can be used?
About as long as it takes for the caulk to be able to come out of the tube in the caulk gun or easily squeezed from the tube. Chuck
__________________
Blogs
Beach House
Sea Trek
Capn Chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 03:36 PM   #10
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
Thanks. Now how long between the time you take it out of the freezer and the time is can be used?
Right away.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 03:45 PM   #11
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by GonzoF1 View Post
Right away.
Thanks. That will help me plan my work.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 04:32 PM   #12
Guru
 
LaBomba's Avatar
 
City: Beaverton, Ontario
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Airswift
Vessel Model: Ontario Yachts Great Lakes 33
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 818
Just a guess but I have to think that a Foodsaver vacuum sealer would work well also. No air it shouldn't cure.
__________________
Allan & Ann
Airswift
LaBomba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 05:03 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
jeffnick's Avatar
 
City: Spartanburg, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Big Duck
Vessel Model: '72 Land-N-Sea
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 425
I was told that 5200 cures by heat and moisture. Recent purchases have lasted far longer after initial use than the same tubes I used 5 years ago. I've had a recent tube take a week to begin getting tacky after application.
jeffnick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 07:29 PM   #14
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBomba View Post
Just a guess but I have to think that a Foodsaver vacuum sealer would work well also. No air it shouldn't cure.
There's no air in the tube if you screw the cap back on. It still cures. As I recall, there is a warning on the tube to use it all within 24 or 48 hours.

I'll try the freezer trick.

Jeff, I've punched holes in the side before to get some out but then the rest cures even quicker. I like your idea about the syringe. I have several of these left over from some medication my wife was using. And that will solve my problem of having some outside the boat for one person to use when inserting thru hulls and some inside for the person tightening the nuts.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 09:35 AM   #15
JAT
Guru
 
JAT's Avatar
 
Country: US
Vessel Name: Just a Tinch
Vessel Model: Gulfstar 44 MC
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 595
I found the solution to this problem was to use Sikaflex products....
JAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 11:09 AM   #16
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar


 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,505
Those products are moisture cured. Keeping them in low humidity should extend their shelf life. No matter what you do, their shelf life is limited, even unopen tubes will harded in a couple of years.
HopCar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 12:08 PM   #17
Guru
 
Brooksie's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod, MA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Island Seeker
Vessel Model: Willard 36 Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 954
Sort of on same subject.
Silicone caulking products do have a shelf life without ever being opened and if they have gone bad, they apply fine but never cure. So after having a huge mess one time, I always check the date on the tube and discard after a year.
Brooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 05:58 AM   #18
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,525
"I've had a recent tube take a week to begin getting tacky after application."

A spritz with water from a Windex style squirt bottle will start the cure and at least stop the surface from being sticky.

Moisture does the curing ,
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 09:33 AM   #19
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
A trick I was taught many years ago by a shipwright we hired occasionally is to cut the end of a finger off a thin surgical glove. Put the fingertip around the end of the tube of sealant and tape it around the nozzle with electrical tape. Then squeeze enough sealant up into fingertip to form a small ball that stretches the end of the finger and seals the nozzle opening.

This works especially well on caulking gun tubes. We've kept partially used tubes of Sikaflex, TDS, and Polyseamseal in excellent, usable condition for close to a year using this technique. We do not refrigerate the tubes, just keep them in a drawer in the forward cabin.

The sealant in the fingertip cures and seals off the rest of the tube which has no air in it. When we want to use it we remove the tape, break off the ball of cured sealant and it's like working with a brand new tube even if it's been months since we last used it.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 10:02 AM   #20
Guru
 
City: Full Time Cruising East Coast
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Meridian
Vessel Model: Krogen-42
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 755
I stick a screw into the screw-on tapered nozzle, then when it sets I just pull it out.

I like Marin's idea.
__________________

__________________
-------------------------
Terry
Meridian
KK-42097
meridian is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012