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Old 11-18-2016, 06:07 PM   #1
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Saloon Headliner Repalcement

For several reasons (general grunge, new wiring, etc.) I removed the original headliner in the saloon. Now I’m in the planning phase for restoration.

The attached pics show the stripped cabin ceiling. You can see the plywood “bows” that laterally cross the overhead. They are approx 1 ¼” deep.

My plan is to overlay the lateral bows with ¼” (?) or so finished teak, mahogany – in other words, presentable wood. In addition, I will add a centerline base to match the depth of the bows. This will later accommodate an overhead grab rail that extends fore to aft in the saloon.

After building/overlaying the bows and new centerline piece, I intend to fabricated infill upholstered panels to cover the overhead spaces. I wind up with several 24-30” wide by 50” spaces between the bows. These are intended to accept the upholstered panels, anchored with 3M dual lock on blocks built to the elevation of the finished bows minus 1/4” or so. Puck LEDs will finish it off.

The goal is to create a bit of “old school” showing the structure while, at the same time, sparing me the tedious chore of ripping out the overhead to install my next great idea that requires wiring or whatever to transit the saloon overhead. I should mention that I am one of those that has a flybridge. Having removable ceiling panels seems like a good solution.

Last – what material to use for the backing? The foam backed vinyl or whatever seems like the way to go. The problem is that there is a 3-4” camber from centerline to side. The automotive stuff I’ve looked at is either a heat and bend to fit or else rigid.

Appreciate any suggestions.
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Old 11-18-2016, 07:20 PM   #2
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PVC board for the upholstered panels.

You might consider adding some insulation up there while it's open.

There are also other options for mounting the panels besides Velcro.

Panel Clips | Panel Mounting | Removable Fixings | Easy Fasteners

http://www.sugatsune.com/panel-clips...-fastmount.pdf
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Old 11-18-2016, 07:23 PM   #3
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I'm very interested in your project since my boat needs the same treatment. Would you mind giving some updates as the project progresses?

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Old 11-19-2016, 10:04 AM   #4
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Bill - thanks, didn't know systems like that existed. Going to study it.

I will, Ken. This is going to be more like a process than an event.
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Old 11-19-2016, 10:34 AM   #5
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I think it's beautiful as is! If I knew mine looked like that I'd strip it in a minute.
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Old 11-19-2016, 10:39 AM   #6
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I think it's beautiful as is! If I knew mine looked like that I'd strip it in a minute.
There is something to be said for the bare fiberglass and balsa core look.
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Old 11-19-2016, 01:12 PM   #7
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There is something to be said for the bare fiberglass and balsa core look.
Easy to make mods and route wire.
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Old 11-19-2016, 01:17 PM   #8
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Easy to make mods and route wire.
True. But I'm not sure I'd want to look at it 24/7.
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Old 11-20-2016, 10:52 AM   #9
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Well, the sky's the limit for your design! Considerations include adequate mounting for handholds, though not all of us are tall enough to think of 'em as useful.

I don't mind the appearance of exposed fasteners, but there are choices. Exposed screw-and-grommet is far from the only answer. My taste would run toward fasteners recessed into holes in the trim, the way they'd look if you did not bung 'em.

Any system that uses removable panels needs to be easy enough so that the panel does not become soiled with handling. The panel edges should not be at risk from prying; a Velcro system would require care in detailing although the 'look' is nice and clean.

Easy to imagine a system that is installed starting on one edge and progresses across the overhead. The last panel or trim would have the only visible fasteners and even they could be concealed above a cornice or valence. Basically a tongue-and-groove system; the intermediate fasteners would not have to be high-tech because they'd be concealed by the next panel or trim. Disadvantage is always having to start disassembly at one edge and work to where you needed to.

It's possible that the boat vibrates a bit while under way; also possible that temperature and humidity varies. These changes cause things to move around and the fastening system needs to cope. The usual solution is lots of fasteners. Another is to make the panels bow so that fastening opposite ends/edges pushes the bowed middle up into place.

Have fun! Share pics! Really, your taste and your penchant for hard work will govern.
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Old 11-20-2016, 11:08 AM   #10
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If you want to add some inexpensive insulation between the bows, try bubble wrap. The ceilings of my trawler have bubble wrap between the headliner and the fiberglass. I wasn't impressed until seeing the difference going South in January and this summer with highs in the upper 90s. Mutiple layers of the small bubble variety should offer the best insular value. Should be very easy to work with and silent unlike some foam insulation board if it moves around.

Ted
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Old 11-20-2016, 11:15 AM   #11
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After having done a number of over head panel jobs, I can say if you use 2" Velcro around the panels or one of the panel mounting system you'll have no issues with panels coming down.

Pulling panels fown with Velcro is no big deal. Just use a metal spatula to get under the edge of the panel and slide it along breaking the Velco bond as you go. They come down quick and easy.

The nice think about using a snap in place panel system is the alignment of the panels can never change like it can sometimes with Velcto.

Using either system there are of course no exposed fasteners.
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Old 11-20-2016, 11:19 AM   #12
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If you want to add some inexpensive insulation between the bows, try bubble wrap. The ceilings of my trawler have bubble wrap between the headliner and the fiberglass. I wasn't impressed until seeing the difference going South in January and this summer with highs in the upper 90s. Mutiple layers of the small bubble variety should offer the best insular value. Should be very easy to work with and silent unlike some foam insulation board if it moves around.

Ted
Bubble wrap works well.

Another soft option is 3M Thinsulate.

3Mâ„¢ Thinsulateâ„¢ Insulation
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