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Old 04-23-2014, 07:17 AM   #1
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Salon Ceiling

I need to install some overhead racks (rod holders, nothing heavy) in the ceiling of my 2009 Mainship 34t. Anyone have any idea what type of hardware to use to anchor them (I'm envisioning a worst case scenario where I punch screws through the floor of the fly bridge). Here are the holders:

4-rod fishing rod storage rack, 1 pr - Whitecap 60612

Mounted to these:

Fishing Rod Storage Mounting Brackets - Whitecap 60609

Any advice would be helpful. I also want to make sure I don't start a tear in the head liner that grows on me.
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Old 04-23-2014, 10:00 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Bsterk View Post
I need to install some overhead racks (rod holders, nothing heavy) in the ceiling of my 2009 Mainship 34t. Anyone have any idea what type of hardware to use to anchor them (I'm envisioning a worst case scenario where I punch screws through the floor of the fly bridge). Here are the holders:

4-rod fishing rod storage rack, 1 pr - Whitecap 60612

Mounted to these:

Fishing Rod Storage Mounting Brackets - Whitecap 60609

Any advice would be helpful. I also want to make sure I don't start a tear in the head liner that grows on me.
Can you feel/see ribs above your headliner? If so perhaps you can mount them to those. Although the ribs may be so thin that you can use those mounting blocks. You just mount the rod holders right to the ribs.
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Old 04-23-2014, 12:35 PM   #3
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Can you feel/see ribs above your headliner? If so perhaps you can mount them to those. Although the ribs may be so thin that you can use those mounting blocks. You just mount the rod holders right to the ribs.
I can not see any ribs (Head liner in salon) but I will feel the ceiling next time I am at the boat. Any ideas on the construction type Mainship used for the salon ceiling/bridge floor (cored, if so how much wood is in there)? If I use the mounting brackets I can probably get away with embedding my screws 1/2". Also, what type of screws, wood I am assuming? unless it is solid glass, in which case does the screw type change?
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Old 04-23-2014, 02:17 PM   #4
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It's not a Mainship, but mine are attached with appropriately sized SS wood screws. I would drill a small test hole with a collared bit to stop the hole at 1/2 to 3/4 inch. I had one come loose underway and in my haste to secure it, I used a screw that was too long. Duh! What a bonehead move. Nothing a little 5200 and paint couldn't fix.





If you look at the bottom surface of the rod mounts, you'll see a leather strap snapped across the bottom of each section to keep the rods in place. I added these to catch a rod that has jumped from its perch. They make a huge difference.
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Old 04-23-2014, 04:57 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Bsterk View Post
I can not see any ribs (Head liner in salon) but I will feel the ceiling next time I am at the boat. Any ideas on the construction type Mainship used for the salon ceiling/bridge floor (cored, if so how much wood is in there)? If I use the mounting brackets I can probably get away with embedding my screws 1/2". Also, what type of screws, wood I am assuming? unless it is solid glass, in which case does the screw type change?
Is the headliner suspended fabric with an air space behind it like in a car or solid fabric covered panels? Wood screws will work.

Technically drilling, tapping and using a machine screw is a better way to go in solid glass but in this case wood screws would work just fine.
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Old 04-24-2014, 07:31 AM   #6
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Be sure you know what you are driiling into. It could spoil your whole day to run a 1/8" twist-drill into a Morse cable, electrical conduit or water line.

Sorry Capt Bill, but I prefer to use self-tapping screws in fiberglass because they are parallel-sided. Drill the correct diameter hole and they cut their own threads. Wood scews are tapered and will tend to bind in fiberglass before they tighten down.

Avoid running short self-tapping screws into thin fiberglass. Consider epoxying in thickening pieces (say 2" x 2") above or below and screwing into the combined thickness. Nothing wrong with thru-bolting provided the bolt is bedded in sealant and the bolthead is not unsightly - consider csk head bolts/machine screws.
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Old 04-24-2014, 08:17 AM   #7
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Shoal waters gives good advice. Also drill an oversized hole in the fixture to be mounted, that way the screw can pull it tight.
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Old 04-24-2014, 10:46 AM   #8
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Sorry Capt Bill, but I prefer to use self-tapping screws in fiberglass because they are parallel-sided.
Actually those are what I use the vast majority of the time. Even in wood. :-)
So I guess I should have used the correct term for them instead of just generically saying "wood screw".
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Old 04-24-2014, 02:20 PM   #9
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Salon Ceiling

Great recs, but how can I investigate water/electrical in the ceiling? I can make an assumption based on where my feeds come from, where they terminate and where my chase is, but like you said, it could make for a long day if I discover something up there that isn't screw friendly.

The through bolt seems excessive for a rod holder, but it does guarantee I don't have a rack come down on my head should I wind up at the lower helm trying to get through a nasty blow (all my planning attempts to eliminate these situations, but the unavoidable is inevitable). Still, I may try screwing and see how much meat I can get. If it feels flimsy I can always go back and through bolt or add some blocking as suggested.
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Old 04-24-2014, 05:23 PM   #10
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Great recs, but how can I investigate water/electrical in the ceiling?

NO PROBLEM. Not many boats run water thru the overhead so that has seldom been a problem.

Back in the day (1970 era) I was an outfitter when boats were sold empty , no stove , no reefer , no autopilot not even a HW heater.

To get the outfitting jobs I worked with importers fixing the new boats up so the could be sold.
Teak decks was an add on option and would be stuck on boats if the owner wanted the the look.

The teak was usually pre assembled and simply stuck down with screws in big sections.

Sometimes screws went thru the wiring so a lamp in the head or fan on the overhead would not function.

Electricians at the time had devices that would chase AC power behind a wall,

My solution was to figure which DC circuit was dead , and use a modified bell (the bell removed) to create pulsating DC.

The electricians gadget was happy with this, so it was easy to locate the wire break.

The hard part was getting rid of the owner or boat sales folks before drilling a hole in the overhead to repair the wiring.

They ALWAYS wanted to know how I knew just wear to drill,no way would I instruct them.


To locate wiring on your overhead the AC wire finding device is still about $15 at Home Cheapo.

And a bell with vibrator can still be found in many hardware stored.

Good hunting.
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Old 04-24-2014, 08:16 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsterk View Post
Great recs, but how can I investigate water/electrical in the ceiling? I can make an assumption based on where my feeds come from, where they terminate and where my chase is, but like you said, it could make for a long day if I discover something up there that isn't screw friendly.

The through bolt seems excessive for a rod holder, but it does guarantee I don't have a rack come down on my head should I wind up at the lower helm trying to get through a nasty blow (all my planning attempts to eliminate these situations, but the unavoidable is inevitable). Still, I may try screwing and see how much meat I can get. If it feels flimsy I can always go back and through bolt or add some blocking as suggested.
Go slow with a hand tool to see/feel what's in there. Most likely all water lines are run from below the floorboards in the ER and lazarette. Nearby lighting fixtures will have wires in the neighborhood...easy to feel around to ensure you're clear of them.

If the wood screw fails, you can always thru-bolt at a later date. Just don't do it in a hurry like I did on the fly. Odds are pretty good you won't F it up. And if you do, then you've learned something new about your boat!! It's all good.
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