Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-07-2016, 12:01 PM   #1
Guru
 
City: Hampton, va
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Didi Mau
Vessel Model: 2003 Ocean Alexander 456
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 599
Roll and tipping

A friend told me of a painter, name unknown, who painted a friend's entire boat using a roll and tip method. He claims the finished job looked as good as any spray job, and cost a fraction of the spray price. The painters were in the Lauderdale area.

Does anyone know of painters like this in the Lauderdale area?

Thanks
Gordon
__________________
Advertisement

Gordon J is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 01:03 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
bnoft's Avatar
 
City: Lottsburg, Va
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Amazing Grace
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 52 Sedan
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 179
My son was telling me about someone he has used (for a customer) in that area. He said the result was as good as a spray job. He is with HMY in the Miami office, if interested give that office a call. Not shilling for him but as we are in VA I did not pay attention to the name. PM me if interested, I can give you his cell.
__________________

bnoft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 01:39 PM   #3
Guru
 
TDunn's Avatar
 
City: Maine Coast
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nunes Brothers Raised Deck Cruiser
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 670
The cost of a paint job is mostly in the preparation. The actual paint application is a small part of a job. A roll and tip paint job might cost a bit less than a spray job because the equipment and space charges will be less. Spraying paint requires a spray booth and personal safety gear for the painter (external air supply, etc.). There is also considerably more masking to do for spraying versus roll and tip. A roll and tip job can be done anywhere with only masking tape for masking. Equipment is a roller pan, rollers and tipping brushes. That said, most of the labor is in the sanding, filling and fairing, priming and sanding before the actual top coat goes on.
TDunn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 02:22 PM   #4
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: East Greenwich, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bella
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,876
While a roll and tip paint job can look very good, the ones I have seen are 4' jobs. A good spray job done in an enclosure with proper prep will look good at 1'


David
djmarchand is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 02:44 PM   #5
Guru
 
City: kemah
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 997
If you are a foot away from my boat, you're too close.
what_barnacles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 04:23 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
bshanafelt's Avatar
 
City: Seattle, WA
Vessel Name: Isobel K
Vessel Model: 37' Custom Pilothouse
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 288
Here is a link to the archive on the topic:

Painting topsides

My experience with roll and tipping is mentioned in post #27. The paint job is now closing in on 8 or 9 seasons and still looks fab.
bshanafelt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2016, 04:46 PM   #7
Guru
 
City: Hampton, va
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Didi Mau
Vessel Model: 2003 Ocean Alexander 456
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 599
Yes I would appreciate a quick reply with this phone number name, and I will give him a call. thanks again

Gordon
Gordon J is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 08:51 AM   #8
Veteran Member
 
Panacea's Avatar
 
City: Islamorada, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Panacea
Vessel Model: Marine Builders, Voyager 70
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 88
Sure, yeah a proper roll and tip brush application "can" look as good as a spray job, but rarely is. The downside of applying by brush is you need to sand between coats and typically 3 or 4 or even more coats are necessary. When spraying, these coats can be applied in the same day. When sanding, you will achieve one coat a day. So almost an entire week for the topcoat. A skilled painter can charge $80+/hr, so I fail to see where the savings are. As stated before, all the work is in sanding, filling, and fairing the surface. I'm not even sure why they call it "painting" a boat. They should call it "prepping".

A buddy of mine anchors out in the bay to shoot topcoat if conditions allow it. Cheaper than hauling and renting a tent in a yard! I'm in the process of bringing back a GS36 MK2 and I'll be doing the same.
Panacea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 09:18 AM   #9
Guru
 
ulysses's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Shores, Ala.
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ulysses
Vessel Model: Romsdal 1963
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 876
Anchoring out and spraying would seem to be a major pollution concern.
ulysses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 09:49 AM   #10
Veteran Member
 
Panacea's Avatar
 
City: Islamorada, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Panacea
Vessel Model: Marine Builders, Voyager 70
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
Anchoring out and spraying would seem to be a major pollution concern.
Hah. You absolutely positively have to be kidding me.
Panacea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 09:51 AM   #11
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
Anchoring out and spraying would seem to be a major pollution concern.
Yes it would.

It's hard to imagine how someone could spray paint a boat while it's in the water and have it look like a professional job. Maybe if it was anchored in a pond or something.

I can see a small touch up but it would be easier in a slip than anchored out somewhere.


That's another one for my upcoming book "101 Stupid Boating Tricks".
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 10:00 AM   #12
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,868
Why would a peaceful anchorage be any worse than a slip?


No dipshi* to start washing the boat next to you while you are trying to paint like my last day painting.


If the conditions are right...other than pollution...why not?


In fact, most anchorages would be preferable to my slip with wind and wave/wake action.


I have often thought of doing the same thing...just doing it in bite size pieces....and no I don't think it will be a perfect job but neither is my rolling and tipping.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 10:03 AM   #13
Veteran Member
 
Panacea's Avatar
 
City: Islamorada, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Panacea
Vessel Model: Marine Builders, Voyager 70
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesK View Post
Yes it would.

It's hard to imagine how someone could spray paint a boat while it's in the water and have it look like a professional job. Maybe if it was anchored in a pond or something.

I can see a small touch up but it would be easier in a slip than anchored out somewhere.


That's another one for my upcoming book "101 Stupid Boating Tricks".


Easy to imagine once you see the results. Works great for everything topside. In a slip or anchored it makes no difference, at all.
Panacea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 10:46 AM   #14
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,725
When we were in New Zealand we saw this done regularly. All the prep is done at the dock. The boat is taken out when the weather is right, a final wipe down and on goes the paint. No over spray on adjoining boats and/or dust to deal with. SOP where we were.
Larry M is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 11:22 AM   #15
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,868
Overspray probably kills more profit margin than anything...thus an anchorage always sounded better to me.


My favorite was when the USCG in Charleston years ago was spray painting red buoys just upwind from the Nat. Guards's nice, pretty yellow green emergency vehicles. The Nat Guard got all huffy about having kinda pink looking vehicles...geeez. Made the USCG repaint them.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 02:52 PM   #16
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
I have rolled and tipped the whole boat several times. However I do a section area at a time each year. Two years ago while out did the entire hull from water line to the rub rail. Took 3 quart of gloss top paint. The secret to roll and tip is the prep and primer coating which is the real protection, and the thin top coat is to, make it shine and pretty.

Also the texture thickness of the top coat should be the same as finger nail polish so it comes on smooth and flattens. The top coat is just enough to cover. If first time get a female to do the tipping as most at least have an idea. The roll is just to get enough paint on the hull to cover the area. The tipping most important is to spead evenly and feather so it blends.

If there are runs streaks just sand down and re paint the area. Do over.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 07:20 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: NONE
Vessel Model: NONE
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 435
Several of the boats beside me were roll & tip painted by the local pro, I would bet my boat that "no one" no matter how close they looked could tell it was not sprayed. Expensive though, 35 to 40K for a 50 footer in average condition.
__________________

Capt Kangeroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012