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Old 10-13-2016, 04:29 PM   #1
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Replacing tempered glass cost DIY

I have been pricing a piece 36" by 28" by 1/4" thick with rounded corners for one of my forward windows.
Prices are all over the place, from $79 to $300!

Cheapest place is Goodman Glass in Hampton Va, local to me.

Anyone know of a cheaper source? So far that is where I am going to get this.

I am making the central forward window hinged so it can open, so I made a teak frame to hold this new piece of glass.
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Old 10-13-2016, 05:03 PM   #2
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Why not laminated safety glass? That's what's in my boat.
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Old 10-13-2016, 05:47 PM   #3
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I have 3 forward windows. The 2 on each side are OEM tempered. The center window was laminated, so I suppose a PO replaced the center with laminated.
Tempered is stronger. Price for tempered is $9 more.
I broke the laminated piece getting it out, when I removed and resealed the tempered glass, it did not break. And the laminated on the edge had developed bubbles. Goodman glass says if laminated glass is not sealed on the edges it will do that.

I have a variety of laminated and tempered on the side windows. The OEM glass in the rear doors is tempered.
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Old 10-15-2016, 11:03 AM   #4
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Album of the window frame I am making
https://goo.gl/photos/hULcFYnvU5rX1UmB6

I obtained the teak from a 1968 Egg Harbor 37 being crushed at the marina. These are 1" thick teak boards had been used in the rear deck.
I did some resawing, shaping, sanding.
I drilled 2 holes in each corner of the frame and glued in 1/4" by 2.5" SS threaded rod.
The glue I used is PL Premium, some mixed with teak sanding dust. And it sticks well to the teak.

It has a 1" overlap all around. The top SS hinge, I will put a piece of PVC fabric to keep out the rain. I will also put some fuzzy stick on door seal on the boat's frame to help keep out water.

Outside will be painted, inside will be bright clear sealed. I plan to leave the brown look, no bleaching to yellow, which is a better match for the interior woodwork.

At the top in the frame will be mounted a wiper motor, so It will lift up with the window.

Only a tablesaw I used and various sanders. These are front side views, the backside is rabbeted to fit into the original boat window frame.

This center window was much larger than the 2 side windows, so wont be missing a few inches of viewable area taken up by the wood in this glass frame. It is sitting on the broken laminated glass I took out, so was good to use as a template.
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Old 10-15-2016, 11:29 AM   #5
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Any decent glass shop can make up - have made up for you - tempered or laminated glass. Various thicknesses and tints are available. Not terribly expensive.

I'll be doing the glass in front of my helm; it's laminated and foggy around the perimeter due to chronic leaks. I'll also be replacing the previously-replaced-with-tinted-acrylic sliding side window.

I've used Glenside Glass, near Philly, for years. Mirrors, tempered glass, insulated glass. Glenside Glass (No, I do not own stock...)
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Old 10-15-2016, 12:23 PM   #6
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Laminated for windshields, even best for sides; tempered will shatter to a million pieces while laminated may survive a direct hit. Think storms and accidents where something hits your windows. Try dropping a tempered juice glass on the tiled floor of your kitchen - shards will hit all 4 walls. There is no place for tempered on my boat.

Run a bead of paint around the perimeter of the glass when you install it or just replace it again when you repaint your windows sometime in the future.
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Old 10-15-2016, 12:52 PM   #7
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We replaced the 6 salon windows with 3/8 laminated safty glass which is what we took out. We replaced withllaminate safty as we have tried to replace as original and since the eagle is a long range coastal we wanted the windows coastal rated. They are tinted dark bronze to reduce the sun light and privacy. The hardest part was removing the teak frames. True Pacific northwesteners have an aversion to bright sun light.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:38 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by DHeckrotte View Post
Any decent glass shop can make up - have made up for you - tempered or laminated glass. Various thicknesses and tints are available. Not terribly expensive.

I'll be doing the glass in front of my helm; it's laminated and foggy around the perimeter due to chronic leaks. I'll also be replacing the previously-replaced-with-tinted-acrylic sliding side window.

I've used Glenside Glass, near Philly, for years. Mirrors, tempered glass, insulated glass. Glenside Glass (No, I do not own stock...)
Exactly why I don't like laminated glass, the edges get foggy and bubbles form. Whether that is preventable, dont know. Every piece of laminated glass I have seen with some age on has done that.

I had a tempered side window shatter all by itself. It was from 1970.
I slid the window and it shattered. Those windows have white plastic flat handles secured with brass bolts into holes drilled in the glass. My guess was the bolt set off the cracking event. Maybe they should have a tiny rubber grommet in the glass hole.

My 2 side front windows are tempered and have some scratches. They have a hard life over 45 years so far they are ok.
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:00 PM   #9
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Y'all are right about tempered glass exploding into shards. Safe shards, but what a mess! Here's a fireplace door I made. Had the glass made by Glenside. Made the hinges and hardware myself. Getting the hinges to align proved a little more difficult and exciting than I'd expected. Made the screens and re-made the grate, too. Modified a trash-picked commercial kitchen oven door into the ash-tray. Did not make the andirons.
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Old 10-15-2016, 06:14 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
Laminated for windshields, even best for sides; tempered will shatter to a million pieces while laminated may survive a direct hit. Think storms and accidents where something hits your windows. Try dropping a tempered juice glass on the tiled floor of your kitchen - shards will hit all 4 walls. There is no place for tempered on my boat.

Run a bead of paint around the perimeter of the glass when you install it or just replace it again when you repaint your windows sometime in the future.


Brings up a point that I experienced about three years ago.
I was going to let it go but I now I won't - bandwagon effect maybe.

My boat was hit. My stbd. side windows were hit by a sailboat. Blew out one mullion entirely, broke a second mullion loose from the frame and damaged the frame top and bottom.
My real point is that although two windows were a maze of cracks and splits they stayed in place enough that I was able to duct tape it all together, both sides of the glass, so it was useable. It was difficult to see through in any measure but the taped up glass held for another two weeks as we made our way home.
Had it been tempered there would have been nothing to tape.
I realize the tempered is stronger by quite a bit but if broken it will turn into tiny pebbles.

Your choice of course and hopefully my experience is never yours but there is a reason for the safety glass.
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Old 10-19-2016, 08:46 AM   #11
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try Danny's

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdowney717 View Post
I have been pricing a piece 36" by 28" by 1/4" thick with rounded corners for one of my forward windows.
Prices are all over the place, from $79 to $300!

Cheapest place is Goodman Glass in Hampton Va, local to me.

Anyone know of a cheaper source? So far that is where I am going to get this.

I am making the central forward window hinged so it can open, so I made a teak frame to hold this new piece of glass.
I am rebidding all my forward windows on my OA 456. I broke a laminated window, about 30 by 30 after removing it. Danny's remade one, while I waited, for $120. I now realize it was high, but quick.

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Old 10-19-2016, 10:43 AM   #12
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Try getting quotes without the rounded corners. That makes it custom size. Easy to square off the corners in the frame.
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Old 10-20-2016, 03:23 PM   #13
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I want the radiused corners as it will better match the look of the other forward windows.
I ordered window yesterday, total cost includes tax $85 at Goodman Glass.
I will have it early next week.

Goodman will do laminated glass in their shop. I read you can have tempered glass with the plastic lamination.
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Old 10-28-2016, 01:20 PM   #14
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That Goodman Glass has a hard time relaying instructions to the glass shop!
I clearly showed with a pattern and dimensions the corner radius.
The first glass come in with a chip, so they rejected it.
The second glass comes in with a huge radius cut, so was rejected.
When talking to the counter person, he said my instructions confused the people at the glass shop.
However, I think the counter guy is kinda slow, I could tell when ordering the glass. He was supposed to email them my dimensions and I think he did not, so they called him and he told them a 2.125 " radius corners.

Thing is my drawing, has a circle diameter of 2.125" corners.
A diameter of a circle is not a radius of a circle. We discussed this when I ordered the glass. And I was very very very clear on the drawing and also said all 4 corners to match identically each other.

So if you use these people, be prepared for a difficult time if the glass is anything but straight lines.
I just called today and glass will supposedly be in next wednesday.
The glass cut with the wrong radius I can have for free. What to do with it, maybe make a table...
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Old 10-28-2016, 01:48 PM   #15
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Sdowney,

I had to replace two of the five front windows I re-bedded last week. One laminated and one tempered. The tempered exploded in my hand. It replaced it with laminated. I used Danny's in Tabb and got replacements while I waited. I made a template for the tempered glass which was irregularly shaped. The window fit first time like it was made for it.

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Old 10-28-2016, 02:02 PM   #16
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Sdowney,

I had to replace two of the five front windows I re-bedded last week. One laminated and one tempered. The tempered exploded in my hand. It replaced it with laminated. I used Danny's in Tabb and got replacements while I waited. I made a template for the tempered glass which was irregularly shaped. The window fit first time like it was made for it.

Gordon
Yes, thanks, at the time I had a sense they would screw up the corners.

Danny's is $110 and Goodmans is $79, so will wait again and see if they can deliver. At some point you have to give up and go to someone who can deliver.

I had a tempered window explode on the boat years ago, sounded like a gun going off, a real shock. But that was one of 18 pieces of glass windows that never have exploded, most of the glass is 45 years old. I don't even recall doing anything to the glass. I may have slid it shut.

Consider all your car windows except the windshield are all tempered glass. They almost never break. I have been told, tempered glass is much more likely to crack from blows on its edges, versus it's faces. My sliding windows have pull handles. And the glass has holes which has brass screws holding the handles, so maybe the rubber grommets are gone. I really should check all the handles. The screws might fracture the edge when pulling the handles.
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Old 10-28-2016, 02:09 PM   #17
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I suspect either choice, tempered or laminated, is adequate for the job. I don't see myself getting into mountainous, breaking seas with this boat.
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Old 10-28-2016, 02:44 PM   #18
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The other option I might do is let Goodman make it from laminated in their shop which is $9 cheaper than tempered, if they can not make the glass according to my pattern.
Make it in their own shop means more direct control of the shape I suppose...
Every laminated glass in my experience develops hazy edges with bubbles.
Goodman says they can seal the edge so it won't.

I have been in a few bad seas in the Chesapeake Bay with breaking waves over the bow that hit the windows hard. This is not a boat I take into the ocean.
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Old 10-28-2016, 03:39 PM   #19
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Chemically toughened glass can bend and not break.
Anyone know about this type?
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Old 10-28-2016, 07:34 PM   #20
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Chemically toughened glass can bend and not break.
Anyone know about this type?
Like a lot of things the discussion is a long but interesting one.

All Glass strengthening relies on a similar principle - glass (like concrete) is strong in compression and weak in tension so in order to strengthen one creates a surface layer that is under tension (similar to pre-stressed concrete).
In order for the piece to break you have to first overcome the surface tension before it will break - but when it does many characterize it as an
explosion" - it is in fact a release of that energy that is build into the part.
The weak point in Strengthened glass (any - chemically, tempered, etc) is the edge so you have to be careful when mounting - any point loading has the potential to cause a break. Best practice is to make sure there is clearance all around - use shims if necessary when mounting to center the piece and fill the void with a flexible sealant.

Generally chemically strengthening - which is a surface treatment - is best used on thin sheets. Heat strengthened (tempered) glass can be used on thicker pieces. Generally speaking chemically strengthened pieces are high volume production and the process doesn't lend itself to one-of-a-kind specials.
Cell phones, tablets, some flat panel display (PC, TV's) also have strengthened cover glass.

Ever hear about Gorilla Glass (TM) that's Corning Inc's chemically strengthened glass for cell phone, tablet, display, etc applications.
This came out of an effort back in the 1960's to produce chemically strengthened automotive glass - a market failure at that time but the basic process is back for above uses and it's creaping back in into the hi end auto market.

I spent a career working for Corning Glass and actually made hi performance aircraft windows (B1-Bomber) from chemically strengthened glass back in the 70's and tempered windows for the space shuttle...as well as many other interesting products & projects.

Here are a few links for addn'l info for those interested

Glass Fabrication Technologies

Chemical Strengthening vs. Heat Strengthening of Glass Substrates

How Tough is Gorilla Glass

A Day Made of Glass 1 & 2 - pretty interesting stuff - this is all possible today not furturistic sci-fi stuff.

No doubt more than you expected - be careful what you ask

Edit: Laminating doesn't add significant strength but it does prevent pieces (shards) of glass form becoming projectiles and causing injuries - hence the use of laminated glass in auto windshields (and the frequent breakage /repair / replacement of windshields)
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