Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-17-2016, 06:32 PM   #21
Guru
 
City: Seaford Va on Poquoson River, VA
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Old Glory
Vessel Model: 1970 Egg Harbor 37 extended salon model
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. 717. Sorry I have to kindly disagree with your bamboo statement. "Bamboo, no grain issue." A bamboo skewer DOES have grain that runs end to end likewise commercial dowel material. One can witness the bamboo grain when one breaks off the skewer. The broken end looks like paint brush bristles.

I do agree they are very strong and hard and the fibers are densely packed parallel to the length. Home made dowels or plugs cut with a plug cutter do have grain running in the opposite direction (right angles to the length).
I know what your saying, but my practical experience showed me they grab and do not tear out. Not being wood, they are a grass, somehow their fibers hold screws. I used them plenty. I was even able to fill up a half inch hole in a plank to hold bronze wood screws, and when cranking down, it pulled the large piece of wood tight and the power drill was stopped. That was on a low down mahogany spray - splash rail into mahogany planks.

My feeling is the screw threads hold because bamboo fibers stick together better than wood fibers, screw thread may be cutting the fibers rather than wedging-splitting the fibers. Wood fiber end grain your wedging in a screw which splits wood fivers apart. Then the screw is loose.

I made plenty of plugs with proper grain orientation to repair stripped holes over the years.
The bamboo worked as well and is a lot easier on me.

It was a big surprise to me how well the bamboo worked.
__________________
Advertisement

sdowney717 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 07:00 PM   #22
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,994
Greetings,
Mr. 717. Hard to argue with experience. Point taken.
__________________

__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 07:03 PM   #23
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Here's method #16:


Drill the hole out for a threaded insert, then use a machine screw.


rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 07:46 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
City: Ft Lauderdale
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 120' Custom, Cat 3512's, 1750 HP ea.
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 159
A variation of the dowel arrangement, I carry bags of various sizes of wood furniture dowels. Furniture dowels are usually either fluted or spiral grooved hardwood so readily accept glue and are available in most common sizes for quick repairs.
BerettaRacer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 09:14 PM   #25
Guru
 
City: Venice Louisiana
Country: United States
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,097
Did your repair work ??? I rest my case.
kulas44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2016, 06:10 PM   #26
Guru
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 675
Lightly pack screw hole with lead wool, then reinsert screw.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2016, 06:16 PM   #27
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: Saint Augustine, Fl.
Country: Port of St Augustine ,FL
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,940
Whats lead wool?
Sailor of Fortune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2016, 09:03 PM   #28
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor of Fortune View Post
Whats lead wool?
It comes from a sheep which acts as a flock leader.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2016, 09:12 PM   #29
Guru
 
boatpoker's Avatar
 
City: Port Credit
Country: Ontario
Vessel Name: DIRT FREE
Vessel Model: Benford Fantail 38
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,011
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
It comes from a sheep which acts as a flock leader.
__________________
If you can live with the consequences, go for it - wg
Y'am what I y'am an' thats' all that y'am - Popeye
As God is my witness, I thought turkey's could fly. Mr.C
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2016, 09:13 PM   #30
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,994
Lead Wool 5 pounds - SLATE ROOF WAREHOUSE
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2016, 10:52 AM   #31
Guru
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 675
Analog of steel or brass wool. Usually sells in 5# chunks at big box stores for $5-6/#. Roofers and historic resto contractors use it a good bit like a caulk. Handy stuff. A little goes a long way for most uses.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2016, 12:51 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
bilge53's Avatar
 
City: Oriental, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V Major Award
Vessel Model: Senator 35 w/single Lehman
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 420
It is used to manufacture heavy weight sweaters and socks.
bilge53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 09:49 AM   #33
Guru
 
DHeckrotte's Avatar
 
City: Philadelphia, PA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Revel
Vessel Model: 1984 Fu Hwa 39
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 824
Boy! That's what a site like this is good for! I knew of lead wool as specified in 1920's architectural publications like 'The White Pine Series' and the first couple editions of 'Architectural Graphic Standards'. Practiced architecture for decades and never saw the stuff even mentioned.

I doubt that you could get it into screw holes. Not even I could ever use enough to justify purchasing 5lbs.
DHeckrotte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 01:33 PM   #34
Guru
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 675
There's NO DOUBT about inserting into screw holes. Maybe you should give it a shot before opining. Use a toothpick/matchstick - whatever's handy and size appropriate. Take a bit of wool, gently work it into the hole without fully compressing, until full, reinsert screw. I've used this many times over the years, for very small up to, I guess, 1/4". Results (if there's enough sound surrounding material matrix) in a secure fastener that lasts a long time.

I actually inherited my little wood box of the stuff from my grandfather in the 70s. A little goes a long way for such use. Devised by people who had little and needed to make do.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 03:30 PM   #35
Guru
 
DHeckrotte's Avatar
 
City: Philadelphia, PA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Revel
Vessel Model: 1984 Fu Hwa 39
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 824
[There's NO DOUBT about inserting into screw holes. Maybe you should give it a shot before opining. Use a toothpick/matchstick - whatever's handy and size appropriate.] You can have NO idea how clumsy I am!

[I actually inherited my little wood box of the stuff from my grandfather in the 70s.] The best stuff comes that way.

[Devised by people who had little and needed to make do.] Lead has been around a long time. Fiberous calking has been around a long time.

I Googled, wondering how lead wool was made. Some hits: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_wool ; even the Despot says they carry it (but not at the store near me): 5 lb. Lead Wool-B13652 - The Home Depot ; A page from 1906 Popular Mechanics suggesting the stuff was new then: https://books.google.com/books?id=YN...20wool&f=false ; a seller's page: lead wool, Chemical grade lead, caulking lead -

And, it's apparently the stuff in the radiation blankets used, for instance, when you're having your teeth X-rayed.

Did not find out how it was made, though.
DHeckrotte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 05:44 PM   #36
Guru
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 675
DHeckrotte:

The lead wool was kept around for precisely the purpose of repairing screw fasteners that had worked loose as we're discussing. If the threads arent completely gone, it works (sometimes) on metal as a poor mans helicoil. Also for slip-fit plumbing joints, although the wool was an expensive way to finish the seal as opposed to lead strips. Yeah, my hillbilly forebears knew and used oakum and other fiber products as appropriate.

Unlike steel, copper, and brass wools that are essentially wire pulled through a die to "shave" two sides of the wire to forming several long planar elements, lead does not have the tensile strength for such processing. Instead, circular plates of lead are cast. These plates are then rotated on a turntable while a pointed tool (similar to metal lathe turning tools) engages the lead surface (think of a vinyl record player), creating long planar shavings. Width of tool end and depth setting produces the "gage" of the wool.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 05:55 PM   #37
Guru
 
City: Melbourne, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 915
I'll bet it's hard to find in the EU. With RoHS getting the lead out of everything, I suspect lead is hard to market over there and perhaps here in the U.S.
stubones99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 06:32 PM   #38
Guru
 
City: Melbourne, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 915
I guess that if you didn't have lead wool, bits of electronics rosin core solder would work too.
stubones99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 09:27 PM   #39
Guru
 
DHeckrotte's Avatar
 
City: Philadelphia, PA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Revel
Vessel Model: 1984 Fu Hwa 39
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 824
SBU, what kind of PE are you? I'm the only white sheep in a family full of engineers.

Interesting/fascinating info re: making lead wool. I could not quite imagine that you could draw lead as is normal for brass, steel, etc.

Getting back on track for the original post, here is a pic of my current screw hole repair effort. See more on my 'Lazarette Hatch' post.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2016-03-03 LazaretteHatch 001.jpg
Views:	39
Size:	117.4 KB
ID:	49507  
__________________

DHeckrotte is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012