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Old 04-18-2016, 10:15 AM   #21
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The joint needs to be mechanically drawn together; not dowels. "Glue" is just that; it is not intended to fill the joint unless in a structural design and prepared for that purpose.
Clamps. I thought that would be obvious. By the time one made room for nuts and washers and plugs to cover bolt heads, there wouldn't be much wood thickness left to hold together.
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Old 04-18-2016, 11:22 AM   #22
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I wonder if you could do what the flooring folks do. Use some teak sanding/sawdust and mix it in some clear epoxy and fill the gap with it.
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Old 04-18-2016, 11:44 AM   #23
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Greetings,
Mr. w. Well, whatever you do you WILL have to clean out that joint, soooo....Pop the bung(s) on the top (overlying) piece and take the screw(s) out. It/they don't appear to be doing anything at this point anyway AND it will facilitate a blade running along the whole mating surface. I suggest running a hacksaw blade through the slot and cutting out whatever is currently in there already to the level of your fiberglass.

Now would be a good time to fill the screw holes that go into your gunwale top as you're going to put those previously removed screws back in and re-bung. A whole thread on TF, somewhere....ahem..."discussing" the "best" method.

OK, Area prepped and ready to go with whatever you decide. IF you decide epoxy/glue of some sort, fill the crack, put as many clamps as you can fit in, put in those screws before the epoxy kicks off, clean up your dribbles and have a brewski. IF you decide to go the all caulk route, caulk, put in the screw(s), clean up the dribbles and have a brewski. OR you could do a combination of both and...yup...


Remember to mask all non-active areas and put down some drop sheet.
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Old 04-18-2016, 12:04 PM   #24
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Going to be hard to clamp that, not much to hold on to. As others state, the joint must be cleaned out of all old glues etc, then the gap filled with thickened epoxy, you can use teak dust or micro-balloons for thickening. When clean, paint a thin coat of epoxy first, let set for a bit before filling the rest with the thick stuff, get a better bond that way. Tough part will be closing the gap, as the screws probably wont do it unless its real springy. You might try weight, lead bars or whatever to bring it down. Clamps are best of course but may be tough. If you have a guard below that could be used with a pipe clamp, that might help. Or if you have a deck opening near by that could be used with a clamp and board over the top as leverage to pull it down enough to hold it with more weight. Some ingenuity may be called for.
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Old 04-18-2016, 05:10 PM   #25
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Since there is nothing to clamp to, you're not going to get under it to add a plate and the joint has not lifted (at least from what I can see in the pictures anyway) clean the joint out to about 1/4" deep or so, fill with epoxy or 5200, repeat if necessary, let set well, sand, varnish and move on.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:37 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Capt.Bill11 View Post
Since there is nothing to clamp to, you're not going to get under it to add a plate and the joint has not lifted (at least from what I can see in the pictures anyway) clean the joint out to about 1/4" deep or so, fill with epoxy or 5200, repeat if necessary, let set well, sand, varnish and move on.
Yup!
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Old 04-19-2016, 07:04 AM   #27
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Clean the joint with a Japanese type saw use "West Systems" to glue sections and brass screw for a mechanical hold .
Over size drill the hole so they can be plugged with dowel .
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Old 04-19-2016, 07:08 AM   #28
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Old 04-19-2016, 07:14 AM   #29
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It sucks to work with but a PL style glue would also work .

Gorilla Glue is the expen$ive version.

PL advantage is it "foams" -expands to fill the joint , so its easier to get 100% 2 surface contact.

A long wooden clamp would hold for curing , and adding a plate , glued on, would not be hard as PL sticks to metal and wood.

Get rubber gloves as it stains fingers "forever".
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Old 04-19-2016, 12:12 PM   #30
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Use bronze or stainless fasteners, not brass.
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Old 04-19-2016, 02:01 PM   #31
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Epoxy and all the other super glues won't allow movement. This is a flexable joint and flexible sealers must be used.

There are basically two kinds. Those that adhere and those that don't. What one uses depends on how much movement there will be. If small enough movement then adhering sealer will do. Perhaps a sealer-adhesive. But in this case metal fasteners are holding the parts together so adhesion is not needed. Whatever you put in there just needs to keep the water out. Dolphinite would be fine but probably would ooze out on a hot day or even a warm day and there would be "ooze" everywhere.

I'd find something like Dolphinite that is much like peanut butter and fill the joint w it. Then put something over the outside seam that will always be dry to touch. The two seam fillers must be compatible w each other.

This should be kinda like caulking a hull plank seam. Put something on the inside of the seam (like oakum) to keep the water out of the hull and something on the outside to keep the oakum in and isolate the oakum so it won't fall out, get torn out or come in contact w other boats (rubber duckies) fenders or even human hands.

My joints on the cap rail are close enough that there is little movement. So I use an adhesive sealant ... Sika-Flex 291.
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Old 04-20-2016, 08:14 AM   #32
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Remove the old fasteners. Saw the faying surfaces of the joint clean. Mask everything within distance of dribble; it's gonna' be awful! Work neat epoxy into the joint and the splits and follow up with thickened epoxy. Clamp with ballast; perhaps you can span across the joint with a chunk of 2x6 supported on the adjacent deck and load the whole thing more heavily and safely. Let cure. Replace the fastenings; where they were in too-thin parts of the scarpf, use Teak dowels epoxied in. (The scarphs on the toe rails of our 1970 LeComte North East 38 were doweled at the feather ends and the normal bunged bronze bolts passed through the middle.) Replace the screws/bolts and bung. The only reasons to repair this non-structural joint is to keep water from lifting the varnish and to prevent rot from starting within the joint where the wood would always be wet.
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Old 04-22-2016, 11:25 AM   #33
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Thanks for the suggestions. I will send pics when finished.
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Old 05-30-2016, 10:49 AM   #34
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What epoxy for a repair like this? I need to fix a scarf joint that was torn apart when it struck an object while docking. I definitely will be using a couple of screws to draw the sections back together, but am unsure of which adhesive to buy.
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Old 05-30-2016, 12:08 PM   #35
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What epoxy for a repair like this? I need to fix a scarf joint that was torn apart when it struck an object while docking. I definitely will be using a couple of screws to draw the sections back together, but am unsure of which adhesive to buy.
West, Fast Tex, Devcon, etc. will work. Anything that dries clear or slightly yellow. If it stays a bit flexible that's even better.
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