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Old 04-23-2012, 02:23 AM   #1
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Removing teak deck, Island Gypsy

In light of the other IG teak decking thread, I took these photos this evening while wandering around the Seaview North yard in Bellingham.

I have in the past mentioned a fellow on our dock who replaced the teak decking on his Island Gypsy himself, did it right, and did a superb job. After removing the teak and prepping the subdeck he applied four layers of glass, then prepped that surface, and applied a non-skid surface. I have stated that not only does his deck look as good or better than what the factory would have done, it's strong enough to land a plane on.

On most boats removing the teak decking reduces the stiffness--- but not the strength--- of the subdeck. So it's proper practice to replace the teak decking with usually two layers of glass on top of the subdeck to restore the stiffness. This guy installed four layers.

Anyway, this fellow, like us, is a refugee from F dock which is being replaced. The port found slips for all of us around the marina so I haven't seen his boat since last fall. But I noticed he was in the yard for bottom paint. So I climbed the ladder and took a shot of his deck. It took him a summer and a half of steady work to do the whole job, and while he told me afterwards that if he'd known beforehand how much work it was going to be he never would have done it, the end result is terrific I think. (The dirt's probably soot from the recent major fire in the marina--- his deck job is immaculate.)

The third shot is of interest to us. The swimstep on his boat is basically the same as ours in terms of its construction and bracing. But he is carrying a 10' Bullfrog--- a pretty heavy dinghy--- on it. Granted, the motor is carried on a separate mount. But we intend to buy a Bullfrog when we eventually get the time to take longer cruises (month to several months) up north. We had figured to tow it, but it's interesting to see one being carried successfully on a swimstep.
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Old 04-23-2012, 05:54 AM   #2
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On most boats removing the teak decking reduces the stiffness--- but not the strength-

Perhaps , but the teak was usually an "extra" not part of the decks initial structural design .

GRP is not stiff , unless it is thick , which means heavy.

A foam core bonded to the old sub surface , with GRP would truely stiffen the boat.

Perhaps worth the effort if the REST of the boat could handle offshore.

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Old 04-23-2012, 01:40 PM   #3
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I wonder how much strain the mast and boom takes off the swim step.

It could be significant.

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Old 04-23-2012, 01:45 PM   #4
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I wonder how much strain the mast and boom takes off the swim step.

It could be significant.

SD
In a static situation I would have to agree...but to keep the weight off in vertical acceleration would mean having it hang so lightly it may rattle and flop around in those snap hooks.

I'm toying with the exact same setup.
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Old 04-23-2012, 01:48 PM   #5
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I hope adding 3-4 layers of thick glass/roving are all it takes to stiffen up the dek after the teak comes off...that's where I am now with starting to glass my flybridge deck and main this summer.
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Old 04-23-2012, 02:17 PM   #6
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I wonder how much strain the mast and boom takes off the swim step.

It could be significant.

SD
While it may look like it in the photo the boom fall is not attached to the Bullfrog unless he's deploying or retrieving it.

We deploy and retrieve our Livingston the same way but do not leave the fall attached to the dinghy unless we're on a longer cruise and are too lazy to re-stow it after every use of the dinghy. But a Livingston is a pretty flexible boat so using the fall to "take weight" off the swim step would just bend the hell out of the side of the Livingston.

We do run a short length of Dacron (little to no stretch) from a deck cleat to the motor safety wire attach ring in the transom of the dingy to remove the "bounce" of the dinghy on the swimstep, however. This is very effective. It's a 39-year old swimstep and we want to make life as easy on it as we can.
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Old 04-23-2012, 02:20 PM   #7
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I hope adding 3-4 layers of thick glass/roving are all it takes to stiffen up the dek after the teak comes off...that's where I am now with starting to glass my flybridge deck and main this summer.
According to the former chief engineer of Uniflite who has his boat on our dock and who helped this fellow "engineer" his teak deck replacement, four layers of glass was way overkill. He said that two would have been sufficient for this particular boat. (Boats with less substantial subdecks may need more, however). But the IG owner wanted four and that 's what he did. Like I said, you could probably land a plane on his deck now.
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Old 04-23-2012, 03:25 PM   #8
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I hope adding 3-4 layers of thick glass/roving are all it takes to stiffen up the dek after the teak comes off...that's where I am now with starting to glass my flybridge deck and main this summer.
When I re did the flybridge on my old Mainship 34, I layed 1 layer of 1 1/2 ounce mat and polyester resin on top of new plywood core, then 1 layer of roving, then 2 more layers of the mat. No problem at all with stiffness, It was much thicker than what the factory had done.
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Old 04-23-2012, 04:31 PM   #9
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Thanks guys....my deck beams are only like 18 inches apart.. so when I took the teak off, there wasn't really any movement except where the glass skins on top/bottom of core and resin had separated from all the teak wood block(s) core.

So I figured... if I pour epoxy in a lot of the enlarged holes where the teak was screwed down, replaced the 3'x7' area of separated wood blocks with a plywood core and then put 2 layers of 18 oz roving/1 layer 6 oz cloth over the whole bridge...I'd be good to go.
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Old 04-23-2012, 05:54 PM   #10
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The fiberglass guys who "advised" me on my core rebuild said NOT to use roving directly on the plywood. Use 1 1/2 ounce mat first, then the roving.
Maybe that's not an absolute, but I wanted to mention that.
They also advocate prepping the plywood by painting with polyester resin thinned 25% with acetone. The acetone slows the cure so it can penetrate the plywood.
Then the resin/mat/whatever will stick better.
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Old 12-01-2012, 06:29 AM   #11
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<http://www.redrockstore.com/resin.htm>
Become familiar with the terms of the various resins. The acetone will not slow the cure at all. It will evaporate about the time that you apply the resin. I would use a coating of epoxy not the standard vinylester and at the same time lay one layer of matting on the epoxy. Than do the rest of your applications. Make sure you sand with 60 grit before you continue with the next coating.
Yes, I have worked for a number of years with boats and fiberglass.
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