Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-03-2015, 09:39 PM   #41
Guru
 
City: Venice Louisiana
Country: United States
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,097
Accepted best practice for "blanking" a thru hull is to calculate the required scarf area for 1/2 the thickness of the hull and grind out that much inside and out. Relaminate using woven "glass cloth, then sand fill and fair. Epoxy only !!!
__________________
Advertisement

kulas44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2015, 10:54 PM   #42
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,379
Don't know if this is the accepted way or not, Bruce, but I found it on the internet so it must be true.

__________________

angus99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2015, 11:57 PM   #43
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar


 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,489
Forklift, Here is what the Groco backing block looks like. They come with threaded inserts so no bolts go through the hull.
__________________
Parks Masterson
www.hopkins-carter.com
HopCar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 07:32 AM   #44
Guru
 
Forkliftt's Avatar
 
City: Biloxi Mississippi
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Patricia Louise II
Vessel Model: 1983 42' Present Sundeck
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,433
That's it!! PM sent


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
✌️
__________________
Steve Point Cadet/ Biloxi, Mississippi USA
*Present 42 twin 135 Lehmans
Forkliftt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 07:44 AM   #45
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,853
Quote:
Originally Posted by angus99 View Post
Don't know if this is the accepted way or not, Bruce, but I found it on the internet so....... ]
it is one of many....

goes to show some if not many of the pros use poly or vinylesters resin believing it is strong enough and actually better for repairs as it has many of the same characteristics of the hull where epoxy doesn't and therefore less prone to stressing and failure.

the video then explains "his theory" on how to lay patches which others will strongly dispute with just as little "scientific evidence" as this guy as to which way is truly better.

so...the "Accepted way"?.....can't really say as like many boat repair "options"....it is just one of many ways of doing it. Some recommend never removing thruhulls....just render them in op and as leak proof as possible....not my way..but one of the many.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 05:28 PM   #46
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,379
Found what appear to be SS elbows on two bronze below-the-waterline seacocks for sink drains. Lots of powder growing out of the joints and some rust stains on the hull below. All the other transition fittings on the boat appear to be heavy bronze. I'll probably try to pull these two seacock/through-hull assemblies this weekend and decide if I have time to replace all 14 on the boat.

angus99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 07:01 PM   #47
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,552
Quote:
Originally Posted by angus99 View Post
Don't know if this is the accepted way or not, Bruce, but I found it on the internet so it must be true.
Thanks, much appreciated, wish my f/g work was as neat and organized. It`s similar to the osmosis repairs I had done on my boat, they used a dished grinder pad to cut away, filling the dish same way with enlarging concentric circles, finishing with epoxy putty. The guy said due to depth some blisters need grinding right through with forming up on the inside, fortunately not required on my boat, but it will be if we delete the washdown thru hull supply.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 07:24 PM   #48
Guru
 
City: Venice Louisiana
Country: United States
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,097
I agree with the vid in almost every aspect and pretty much that is how I do it. I like to grind inside and out with a 12 to 1 scarf ratio. I ONLY use a 5 to 1 epoxy for this type of repair, and no CSM, only cloth. The opinion of most current and in the know real professionalls is that the polyester resin that your boat was built with had a "waxing" additive (PVA) that allowed it to cure, without which it would remain in a raw state. Poly or even vinyl ester doesnt stick well to cured polyester fiberglass. Epoxy has the best adhesion of any known and easily available product. This whole thing is a time consuming and labor intensive exorcise, with about $20 worth of materials. Dont scimp, use the good $hit.
kulas44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 08:29 PM   #49
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,853
Laminating resin contains no wax. The last coat needs wax added or some other air inhibiting covering.

While epoxy is used a lot....yet vinylester is used by many pros too with very professional results. Some repairs are better off due to the characteristics mating the rest of the shell. The discussion results in adhesion over the scared area is more than necessary for the intended repair.


http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...ct.do?pid=2082


TotalBoat Polyester Laminating Resin is used as a first coat for base coat applications. Without wax, this resin remains tacky to hold fiberglass fabric in place on vertical surfaces. Needs no sanding between coats. Laminating resin is excellent for saturating fiberglass fabrics. MEKP Hardener included.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2015, 09:50 PM   #50
Guru
 
City: Venice Louisiana
Country: United States
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,097
That is correct, but, the last coat is always waxed. Non of the esters has the adhesion properties of even the lowest grade of epoxy. I will concede that poly is easier to work with and even the least skilled person can use it, somewhat successfully. Its kinda like the difference between rivets and welding, anyone can rivet but not everyone can weld, it takes practice and skill. both work but given the choice I would take welded everytime.
kulas44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 01:02 AM   #51
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
If you forget the wax you can cover it with plastic wrap and tape it off good. It will stop the air from getting to it and allow it to cure. Basically it does the same thing the wax does. Seals out the air.
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 07:51 AM   #52
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,734
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
it is one of many....

goes to show some if not many of the pros use poly or vinylesters resin believing it is strong enough and actually better for repairs as it has many of the same characteristics of the hull where epoxy doesn't and therefore less prone to stressing and failure.

the video then explains "his theory" on how to lay patches which others will strongly dispute with just as little "scientific evidence" as this guy as to which way is truly better.

so...the "Accepted way"?.....can't really say as like many boat repair "options"....it is just one of many ways of doing it. Some recommend never removing thruhulls....just render them in op and as leak proof as possible....not my way..but one of the many.
I removed and glassed over 4 thru hulls, and replaced the remaining 2.
I use polyester resin for the reasons above, and I lay out the patches in a similar manner. That is how I was taught. It seems to have worked for me.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 10:16 AM   #53
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,512
Any secondary bonding , weather in a new green hull after 3 days or an old 1960s boat REQUIRES 85% of the surface to be ground to clean glass.

Thats the USCG rules when working / building a sub: T boat , so it should be fine for anyone.

Using wax to block air from the last layer of resin went out with resin infusion.

Regardless of cost or allergies EPOXY is the best for repair and modifications , leave the waxed polly resin and Bondo on the shelf.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 11:13 PM   #54
Guru
 
HopCar's Avatar


 
City: Miami Florida
Vessel Name: Possum
Vessel Model: Ellis 28
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,489
It is my belief that you build boats with polyester but you fix them with epoxy.
When you're repairing a boat you are essentially glueing new bits to the boat. I've never seen polyester glue.
__________________
Parks Masterson
www.hopkins-carter.com
HopCar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 08:00 PM   #55
Guru
 
Forkliftt's Avatar
 
City: Biloxi Mississippi
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Patricia Louise II
Vessel Model: 1983 42' Present Sundeck
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,433
My through hull/ POS seacock are out! I went with the advice of kulas44 and as promised, grinding the mushroom head off which heated old glue and bing bang boom. Look at the backing board " glued" down with silicone. Geez.
New parts are already ordered and will be here soon.
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTrawler Forum1423443519.669464.jpg
Views:	72
Size:	33.5 KB
ID:	37203Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTrawler Forum1423443547.286963.jpg
Views:	99
Size:	35.4 KB
ID:	37204Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTrawler Forum1423443564.288398.jpg
Views:	73
Size:	51.9 KB
ID:	37205Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTrawler Forum1423443581.557020.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	53.4 KB
ID:	37206Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByTrawler Forum1423443599.041603.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	56.3 KB
ID:	37207


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
✌️
__________________
Steve Point Cadet/ Biloxi, Mississippi USA
*Present 42 twin 135 Lehmans
Forkliftt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 08:13 PM   #56
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,994
Greetings,
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 08:57 PM   #57
Guru
 
Forkliftt's Avatar
 
City: Biloxi Mississippi
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Patricia Louise II
Vessel Model: 1983 42' Present Sundeck
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,433
RT- that's EXACTLY how I felt❗️❗️❗️


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
✌️
__________________
Steve Point Cadet/ Biloxi, Mississippi USA
*Present 42 twin 135 Lehmans
Forkliftt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 09:07 PM   #58
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,994
I knew that...
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 10:33 PM   #59
Guru
 
City: Venice Louisiana
Country: United States
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,097
I will be first to tell you that I am an a$$. But, I have been there and done that, got the Tshirt when it comes to boats, especially fiberglass boats. If I say "this is how the best yards do it" or "this is accepted best practice" well,,,, it is. I wont apologize if you did it like the locals do and it worked for you. I also will not bask in glory when , or if, you report that the repair is 3 years later a dismall failure. However, I will advice you again on the "best practice" way to do it. Just sayin
kulas44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 10:47 PM   #60
Guru
 
Forkliftt's Avatar
 
City: Biloxi Mississippi
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Patricia Louise II
Vessel Model: 1983 42' Present Sundeck
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,433
Roger that. Well noted😊


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
✌️
__________________

__________________
Steve Point Cadet/ Biloxi, Mississippi USA
*Present 42 twin 135 Lehmans
Forkliftt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012