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Old 04-24-2012, 09:40 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by GonzoF1 View Post
Can someone describe what bond breaking tape does? Do you use it IN the groove? Not sure I understand the application here.
Thank you one and all for the helpful contributions to this project.Having previously done some small patch repairs to the caulking,I think the most challenging part of the job is deepening the grooves without doing violence to the teak.

My (perhaps) simplistic view of bond breaker tape is it provides a base for the caulk pumped into the groove but allows the caulk to "float" free of the groove base,so the caulk moves with and stays attached to only the sides of the groove.

TDS responded to an email sent to an address I found via internet search. They have just one agent for all Australia,located in Perth, Western Australia, opposite side of the country from Sydney.The usual chandlers do not stock their products.They sent useful information on preparation and product usage I am happy to share if you PM me with email address.They say that unlike Deckflex and Sika caulks,their product needs no primer for teak application, provided the seams are properly prepared.
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Old 04-24-2012, 09:58 PM   #22
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Cool

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They say that unlike Deckflex and Sika caulks,their product needs no primer for teak application, provided the seams are properly prepared.
BruceK
True, but the inside of the groove needs to be wiped down with acetone just prior to appying the TDS. The acetone removes any surface traces of oil which permits a better bond between the sealant and the wood.
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Old 04-24-2012, 11:35 PM   #23
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Very glad I stumbled on this thread as I'll be getting to re-caulking seams soon. I suppose a ships supply would have the tape ?
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:07 AM   #24
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If you elect to use the 3M auto striping tape as we do, you can get it at stores that sell professional auto painting supplies.
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:28 AM   #25
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Very glad I stumbled on this thread as I'll be getting to re-caulking seams soon. I suppose a ships supply would have the tape ?
The chandlery supply chains in Australia don`t seem to stock it; in USA TDS stockists should have it and your local auto parts shop should have decorative auto pinstripe stripe tape which works (see Marin`s post).
When I searched the tape on the net,one hit was specifications for a building job authorizing using ordinary masking tape as bond breaker tape. Problem might be finding 1/4inch masking tape.
Logic suggests that once the caulk cures without bonding to the base of the channel, it never will and the tape has done its job. Logically,logic is always right,but......
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Old 07-12-2012, 12:52 PM   #26
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I need to do a make-over on our foredeck's teak. It is the only remaining original teak decking, side & cockpit decks having been removed, deck epoxy'd and new teak glue-fixed over.

But I have some screws that have lost their bungs and the last sanding went close to the tops of these. I understand screws can be removed and epoxy 'plugs' injected in their place (then capped off with bungs)...anyone with experience of doing this?

Two independent shipwrights have concluded the deck is in sufficiently good condition that replacing at least the visible screws this way, then setting up a guide and router-ing out the caulk lines before re-caulking, is the way to go.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:43 PM   #27
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But I have some screws that have lost their bungs and the last sanding went close to the tops of these. I understand screws can be removed and epoxy 'plugs' injected in their place (then capped off with bungs)...anyone with experience of doing this?.
We have done all the maintenance on our 39-year old teak deck ourselves for the 14 years we've owned the boat. The one exception is we hired a shipwright to regroove and reseam the main deck a few years after buying the boat. Everything else--- resetting and resealing deck screws, replacing plugs, repairing or replacing seams---- we do ourselves.

It's pretty easy work once you understand the techniques and have the right tools.

There have been how-to discussions on this forum in the past and there is a ton of information on the care and feeding of teak decks on the Grand Banks owners forum Grand Banks Owner's Resources since most GBs have them. You have to join the forum to access the archives I think, but it's free.

If you have specific questions on the techniques, tools, or materials feel free to PM me if you like.
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Old 04-03-2013, 09:51 PM   #28
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Yes, I'm bringing this one back to life! Lots of good information right here.

My Questions:
- I've read to not get any solvents near the teak...how do you get the solvent into and to clean the seams? with a q-tip?
- bonding tape - only on the bottom of the seams?
- deck must be dry - so being clean as well is an impossibility?
-How can I be sure the deck is dry enough? The acetone cleans the seam and the side of the teak planks?
- why do some people route? Is it only if the seam is deformed?

It is said to do small sections at a time, does this mean you do not need to keep a wet edge?

Our deck seams are starting to separate. Bungs are in great shape. No signs of leaking, just need new caulking.

Thanks Ya'll!!
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:21 PM   #29
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Solvent won't hurt the teak--- I clean the grooves prior to putting in bond breaking tape and then new sealant with a rag and acetone.

The bond breaking tape should only be applied to the bottom of the groove. This is to prevent the seam sealant from adhering to the bottom of the groove. If it does, the sealant will pull away from one side or the other of the groove sooner rather than later as the planks work and expand and contract with temperature and moisture. You want a bond only on the opposite sides, not on the opposite sides and the bottom.

The deck is dry when the deck is dry. It's just something you have to learn to judge.

The reason seams have to be routed or regrooved is if the planks have been sanded too much or treated with teak cleaner/restorer (which does the same thing as sandpaper only chemically) and there is not enough wood thickness left for an effective groove. So the groove needs to be cut deeper. Obviously there is a limit to how much this can be done, and when that limit is reached the deck planks must be replaced or removed. If the owner elects to remove them something else must be put in their place, usually a couple of layers of fiberglass followed by a non-skid surface.

This is why sanding, powerwashing, chemical cleaning or "restoring," scrubbing with the grain, etc. are all Very Bad Things to do to a teak deck because all of them make wood cells go away and wood that goes away never comes back.

The main objective in caring for a teak deck--- and we've brought a very bad one back from near failure and have been taking care of it now for the last 14 years--- is to a) keep it clean, b) maintain the inegrity of the seams because a failed or separated seam is how moisture gets under the planks, and c) replace missing deck screw plugs as soon as practical as this is another way moisture can get down under the planks.
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Old 04-04-2013, 01:37 AM   #30
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I was irresponsible for the thread you revived. After much research I decided my decks could not be, had them removed, did the bow section with non skid on 2 layers of glass, the rest in new teak glued over 1 layer of glass;the outer strip is screwed to provide a means to fix the inner planks. I watched the work done, the teak part was s-l-o-w. Fortunately, your decks sound repairable.
Additional to Marin`s response:
Routing the groove requires fixing and controlling the router/trimmer, can`t be done freehand, requires expertise.
The groove should be primed with the sealant makers primer.
The edges of the groove can be taped with masking tape and the groove slightly overfilled. When completely dry,sand the lot smooth.
You do short distances of sealant, in sections, so your knees don`t get stuck in wet sealant. Think of working along a side deck, doing all 5 or 6 grooves as far as you can reach, repeating and repeating.
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Old 04-04-2013, 12:32 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Besslb View Post
Yes, I'm bringing this one back to life! Lots of good information right here.

My Questions:
- I've read to not get any solvents near the teak...how do you get the solvent into and to clean the seams? with a q-tip?
- bonding tape - only on the bottom of the seams?
- deck must be dry - so being clean as well is an impossibility?
-How can I be sure the deck is dry enough? The acetone cleans the seam and the side of the teak planks?
- why do some people route? Is it only if the seam is deformed?

It is said to do small sections at a time, does this mean you do not need to keep a wet edge?

Our deck seams are starting to separate. Bungs are in great shape. No signs of leaking, just need new caulking.

Thanks Ya'll!!

I re fastened and calked the front deck and did it all my hand. I used a hook nose carpenter knife to cut out the old calking, then used a narrow screw driver to ream out the remaining old calking and teak wood to new bare wood. Clean up the groove with 80 sand paper and then acetone. I did not put any tape at the bottom of the groove as I wna the calking to bill the grove plus stick to the fiberglass and fill any space between the teak and the fiber glass deck.

I used Boat Life calking made for Teak and did in areas no larger than I could reach as calking is messy and the tape has to be taken off before the calking dries. Messy job. I used 1 blue tape as that seem to cover the teak boards between the groves. Filled the groove with calking, and pressed the calking firmly into the groove is cheap throw away putty knifes. Have plenty of throw away rubber gloves, paper towels and paint thinner. Paint thinner removes the calking before it dries. Like a said to small areas at a time when calking.

If find the seam that need replacing wet down the deck, and the last wet caulking areas to dry are the area that the calking is not holding. Mark them with blue tape, start taking out the old calking, let dry for several days in the sun. the Eagle deck shrinks about 1/8 to inch in the summer so each year. So each year I wet the deck down to find the seams, and take out the old calking and replace. Like a wood boat the teak wood will swell and make the deck water tight.

If there are any bungs/plugs popping up/out the fastener needs to be replaced also before the deck is re calked.
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Old 04-04-2013, 04:15 PM   #32
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If you are going to reseam a teak deck there is only one sealant on the planet worth using and that is TDS (Teak Deck Systems). Everything else, particularly Lifecaulk in our experience, is absolute crap by comparison in terms of longevity and integrity.

TDS is what manufacturers like Grand Banks, Fleming, Delta, and all sorts of high-end yacht builders have been using since the stuff was introduced some years ago.
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Old 04-04-2013, 04:40 PM   #33
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There are numerous videos on youtube about reseaming teak decks by a variety of people using a variety of methods. Here is one from Teak Deck Systems.

Teak Decking Systems: How to Reseam a Teak Deck - YouTube
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:21 AM   #34
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Having been through this recently and learned my lesson, just let me say, pay very careful attention to Marin!
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Old 04-10-2013, 12:30 PM   #35
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If you are going to reseam a teak deck there is only one sealant on the planet worth using and that is TDS (Teak Deck Systems). Everything else, particularly Lifecaulk in our experience, is absolute crap by comparison in terms of longevity and integrity.

TDS is what manufacturers like Grand Banks, Fleming, Delta, and all sorts of high-end yacht builders have been using since the stuff was introduced some years ago.
Well, the so call Boat Life CRAB has lasted going on 14 years. Just make sure is the TEAK calking as regular caulking does not last very long.
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Old 04-10-2013, 12:49 PM   #36
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You're the first person I know of who's had success with Lifecaulk. The shipwrights we worked with us on our deck all had given up on it years earlier. And the one time we did use it on deck for seam work it failed within a few months. And yes, we used the "teak seam" product. Terrible product in our experience and opinion.

TDS, which was not on the market when we had our main deck re-grooved and re-seamed, is vastly superior to everything else currently available, at least in the US. I wish TDS had been available when we did our whole deck. All the re-seaming work I've done since has been with TDS and what a difference it makes. Lifecalk is a joke compared to this stuff.

Fortunately our main deck re-seam was done with a fairly good product so most of it has held up okay over the last 12 years. But some sections, particularly the aft deck which was re-seamed when the weather was turning, have had to have some re-seaming over the last few years so I've gotten pretty good at the process. But without a really good seam compound it's all wasted effort.
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Old 09-15-2013, 05:57 PM   #37
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If you sand your decks after caulking, you are probably using up at least 10 years of your deck's very finite life. Just cut the top off the caulk with a razor, a sharpened chisel or any other flat sharp implement. That will leave the top of the caulk smooth and flush with the teak and will extend your deck's life.

The little blade of a Swiss Army knife is excellent for reefing out the old sealant. I used a Fein tool to saw off the tops of the new teak bungs, or, if out in an anchorage, one of those flexible Japanese cabinet saws. Then a dab of sandpaper to make the bungs smooth.

The most pleasant way to do decks is to do small areas at a time while at anchor. Send the crew off in the dinghy to fish or crab or whatever while you put on some quiet music, pour a Guinness and get down on the deck and attack the part you have determined needs the most attention. By the time your crew returns, you have cleaned up, pulled the tape and finished the Guinness. Next day you slice the top off your new seams and start all over on the next-worst-most-likely-to-leak-next patch... Its quite painless (if you remember to wear knee pads) and the Guinness works very well as a muscle relaxant.
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Old 09-16-2013, 05:30 AM   #38
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A Guinness man, excellent! As a matter of interest what is your boat?
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Old 09-16-2013, 11:42 AM   #39
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It was a Grand Banks 32 but we are currently boatless, in the hunt for another boat.
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Old 09-16-2013, 11:44 AM   #40
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...probably without teak decks...
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