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Old 10-10-2014, 10:48 AM   #21
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For diesel engines, API has a separate rating system. The current category is CJ-4 for 2007 and newer diesels. CI-4 was introduced in 2002 for diesels that have exhaust gas recirculation) and can be used in 2002 to 2006 diesel engines. The previous CH-4 (introduced in 1998) can be used in 2002 and older diesels. Previous API classifications CG-4 (1995) and CF-4 (1990) are now considered obsolete. CF-2 (1994) is the API classification for two-stroke diesels.
API also gives oils an "Energy Conserving" rating if the oil meets certain criteria for reducing friction and oil consumption, and improving fuel economy. Most 5W-20 and 5_30 oils meet this classification.
Motor oils that meet the API SN rating are equivalent to oils that meet the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee (ILSAC) GF-5 specifications, which some European and Asian auto makers require. SN rated motor oils typically meet the previous GF-4 standards.
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:55 AM   #22
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the oil argument will never end because there are no controlled experiments in boats, however I subscribe to the modern additives targeted on wear reduction for modern tight engines using modern fuel. I don't see how wear reduction additives can be a bad thing.
I wont go as far as synthetic oil however. As I said in older engines IMO virtually any detergent oil would likely never show any difference.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:11 PM   #23
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Capthead wrote via his link;
"SAE 30 or 40 would probably become so stiff at sub-zero temperatures the engine might not crank fast enough to start."

That's the bottom line. That's the reason for MV so if your engine cranks fine at the lowest temp you'll encounter you don't need MV oil. And our trawler engines snug in their engine compartments don't get that cold.
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Old 10-10-2014, 01:04 PM   #24
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I have already posted a thread on my oil. I use synthetic and it's a multi of course. I run cooler and I have much less smoke and oil sheen at start up.

I have had people tell me I don't know what I'm talking about in reference to less sheen and smoke. I also think they didn't believe the temp gauges show a 5 degree drop in temp. I'm fantasizing that.

The oil debate is in a close tie to the anchor debate. Neck and neck. No clear winner yet.
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Old 10-10-2014, 02:50 PM   #25
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Capthead,
When you say you use MV "of course" do you mean you wouldn't use straight weight synthetic if it was available? It isn't because there is no such thing. Synthetic meets the MV rating requirements w/o any viscosity improvers because it's stable enough. And that's another benefit of syn oil. Your syn oil is better in the same way Dino oil is as it dosn't have any viscosity improvers. Syn oils that have wide viscosity ratings like 5W40 probably do though.

I'm not convinced syn has lower friction due to anything beyond a lower viscosity and I remain convinced it's not cost effective. But I'll never say it's not better.
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Old 10-10-2014, 05:45 PM   #26
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Is my anchor better than your oil??
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Old 10-10-2014, 07:48 PM   #27
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Anchor ...... Wazatt?
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:00 PM   #28
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American Diesel is adamant about using single grade 30 or 40. They are the experts on these engines and I am not about to disagree with them.

For the OP, The Trawler Beach House has an excellent series of tutorials regarding the care and feeding of the Lehman 120. Really helped me the first time I changed my oil.

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Old 10-10-2014, 09:06 PM   #29
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I try not to exceed 2000 RPM in my gasoline-powered Ford vehicle and 1400 RPM with my boat's JD4045 diesel before reaching operating temperature. Perhaps this explains my sister's statement that I drive like a "grandmother."
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:40 PM   #30
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I have a diesel truck and the GB with twin Ford Lehman natural Aspiration engines. I've constantly viewed the truck as a test platform for the boat. As such I went through about ten years of testing additives and then I switched to oils.

The boat's hour meters had failed and been replaced a few times so your guess is as good as mine on engine hours. Keeping in mind my boat came from Boston to Los Angeles via the ditch it has hours. Lots of hours.

Everyone in 1994 told me "you can't put synthetic in an old engine"
DON'T PUT SYNTHETIC HIGH DETERGENT OIL IN AN OLD ENGINE!!!

I said, watch me.

I changed one engine to synthetic the other was Rotella fossil. Started them both. Major difference in smoke and sheen and thats immediately. after a trip to Catalina and back I changed the Rotella to Delvac1 and I haven't regretted the change ever since.

It's much more expensive and my next change might be a different brand of synthetic if I can't find Delvac1 reasonable.

One last note.

I replaced the engine in my Jimmy at 616,000 miles. I had a complete engine build, balanced, ceramic coated pistons, longer duration cam, etc plus a newer year block. I drove that on fossil for 16,000 miles and switched to Delvac1 synthetic. I was never real happy with it and I was burning oil more than I expected for a new engine.

Finally after many years and about 60,000 miles I changed to fossil oil. The first 3000 miles I went through three quarts. Changed it to fossil again. This is that change now and my engine has finally seated in. I'm not burning oil and I went up 1.2 MPG as well. I'm going to go one more fossil change then I'll switch back to Delvac 1.

BTW, I'm using Delvac 15W 40 I think. I have to check.
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:33 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Arch View Post
American Diesel is adamant about using single grade 30 or 40. They are the experts on these engines and I am not about to disagree with them.



Arch
Yeah well, they also advocate adding Marvel Mystery Oil to your fuel and that's a crock. So sorry, apparently they don't know it all.
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Old 10-10-2014, 10:39 PM   #32
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I agree Cap,
You can put syn oil in a 37 Plymouth as long as it's not sludged up but I don't think you'll notice any engine improvement. Synthetic oil is superior .. no doubt about it.

As far as I know the only advantage to synthetic lube oil is the ability to maintain a good film of oil at very high temperatures. Like in a turbocharger or a racing engine. Dino oil gets the job done fine on NA engines commonly found in trawler boats. They don't present a challenge to dino oil and as far as I know synthetic oil offers no cost effective advantage.

If you can please submit an objective (a truly independent source) report that shows there is a significant and cost effective advantage (excluding lower fuel burn) to using syn lube in old or modern low temp low performance engines and I'll seriously consider using it myself.

Can't deny that American Diesel has a lot of experience but I'd look to the engine manufacturer (in this case Ford) for that kind of information. But Ford didn't make a marine engine and the marine engine operates under different conditions than truck engines. So the above is flawed. However for old engines that are no longer being manufactured one could look at another brand of engine that was extremely similar to (in this case) the Ford Lehman. Perkins. 6-354. Just about the same in all respects except the name. And the Perkins engine is a marine engine. If you do I'll bet they recommend exactly what Arch talked about in his post.
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Old 10-11-2014, 01:01 AM   #33
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Boat is a 1981 34' Marine Trader with a Lehman Ford 120. I'll be changing my oil this week for the first time and was wondering about the best oil to use. What type and weight of oil do you use? I know the manual says 30 weight for my weather conditions but that was written in 1981. Oil has change over the years. Looks like the PO used Shell 10w40 the last time. Do you use the same oil in the fuel-injector pump, as you do in the engine, or 30 weight? As always thanks for helping out!


Both my Diesel mechanic and my surveyor stated to stick specifically with Chevron Delo SAE 30. What is the advantage for me to go with something different? A few dollars saved by purchasing from Walmart?

Yes, you use the same oil in your injector pump.... when draining my injector pump (can be very messy), I have had excellent results with a dust pan, specifically one with a channel down the handle and a paper cup...... Good luck!

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Old 10-11-2014, 07:44 AM   #34
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what do all the "oil experts" make out of this ONLY reference to oil use in MY owners manual for my 120L????
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:50 AM   #35
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You have an old engine, and good luck finding 20W20 on the Walmart shelf.

Be sure to answer them honestly at the checkout when they ask "Did you find everything you were looking for today?"

I always do; which makes for an uncomfortable silence.
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Old 10-11-2014, 10:27 AM   #36
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You have an old engine, and good luck finding 20W20 on the Walmart shelf.
I think you are reading the chart wrong. The way I read it is 10W30 will hold for most boating conditions.
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Old 10-11-2014, 11:04 AM   #37
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I remember 20W20 but don't recall what it was. Before MV many (to most) people used 30wt in the summer and 20wt in the winter. But a lot also used 20wt on low mileage engines and 30wt on high mileage engines. In those days that would be cars w over 60,000 miles accumulated.
Scott's manual clearly says to use 20wt except over 90 degrees. And when that manual was written most Lehmans probably ran at much higher loads.

I looked around and it seems 20W20 was sorta like 10W30. The difference has to do w the pour point and depressants that made it closer to 30wt at higher temps but better suited to winter as well. From what I read it sounds like it had some rudimentary viscosity improvers in the additive package.
And it seems Conoco Phillips may offer the oil now.
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Old 10-11-2014, 11:28 AM   #38
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Oh I'm pretty sure I'm reading the chart right. 20W20 did and still does exist. Very common spec for British cars if a similar vintage.

The SAE system has a fairly high range of viscosity represented by the weight number which was originally a drip number from 100 years ago.

Thank goodness for ISO ratings.

But I agree 10W30 would be fine.
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Old 10-11-2014, 11:32 AM   #39
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Oh I'm pretty sure I'm reading the chart right. 20W20 did and still does exist.
But not at Walmart....
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Old 10-11-2014, 11:34 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Arch View Post
American Diesel is adamant about using single grade 30 or 40. They are the experts on these engines and I am not about to disagree with them.

For the OP, The Trawler Beach House has an excellent series of tutorials regarding the care and feeding of the Lehman 120. Really helped me the first time I changed my oil.

Arch

Agree on Trawler Beach House. Here is the link....

The Trawler Beach House: Ford Lehman Diesel Oil And Filter Change
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