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Old 10-02-2013, 03:46 PM   #21
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Thanks John Baker,
I'da never thunk and it's a great idea. My only reservation is young men's feet all over the place and it's not their boat. but my biggest problem is fixing the oil leak before the cleaning.

I remember working at Uniflite it was said that a boat experiences a lot of wear and abuse just getting built.

On the other hand I do step on things that worker ants probably would'nt.
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Old 10-02-2013, 04:06 PM   #22
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Two tips that I used on my old boat, who's perkins 4-236 were pretty bad about slobbering.

1. Try using aluminum turkey pans under your engines. I could fit three under each engine. You can flex or bend them to get them in place then straighten them back out after they are in.

2. When painting your engines wrap hoses, wire bundles etc. in foil. Way easier than masking tape.

3. Use a shop vac to suck the oily water and gunk out of the bildge.
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Old 10-02-2013, 04:17 PM   #23
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(Doug-- sent PM on shop vacs in bilges)
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:45 PM   #24
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On the wiring, replace any banjo strings (too short but they j u s t get there) and watch for splices. I can do splices on jet aircraft wiring, but I spent 20 years fixing jet fighter-bombers radar and missile firing systems. The splices I have encountered out in the free world are very shaky, brittle, poorly done and will lead to problems. Buy a good set of crimpers, everyone tries to use those automotive things that are basically junk.

On the engine drippage, I thought you might try some kitty litter under there. Every few weeks scoop it out and replace it. The stuff will absorb oil like a sponge. We used it alot for hydraulic spills. It has floral scents, what more could you ask?

The flexible pan is much neater, I just thought I'd throw that in.
Also, Dawn dish washing liquid really does cut grease. Simple green is acid, I believe, wear gloves if you use it.
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Old 10-02-2013, 06:24 PM   #25
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I use kitty litter for absorbing material off the boat but not on. If something like that plugged a bilge pump it could contribute to a very bad day.

Bilge/engine room storage should be minimal and limited to essentials neatly and "securely" stowed for the reason stated above. If it can float it will float directly to your pump inlet. I'm very anal about things like that, suppose we all have pet peeves.

I use TSP for bilge cleaning if standard laundry detergent lightly agitated with a brush will not cut it.
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Old 10-02-2013, 06:35 PM   #26
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I use kitty litter for absorbing material off the boat but not on. If something like that plugged a bilge pump it could contribute to a very bad day.

Bilge/engine room storage should be minimal and limited to essentials neatly and "securely" stowed for the reason stated above. If it can float it will float directly to your pump inlet. I'm very anal about things like that, suppose we all have pet peeves.

I use TSP for bilge cleaning if standard laundry detergent lightly agitated with a brush will not cut it.
Never occurred to me, that's why I should go back to lurking.
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Old 10-02-2013, 07:35 PM   #27
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Never occurred to me, that's why I should go back to lurking.
I wouldn't do that, there should be at least a half dozen people along any minute that disagree with me
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Old 10-02-2013, 07:56 PM   #28
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I wouldn't do that, there should be at least a half dozen people along any minute that disagree with me
I just failed to consider the bilge pumps and screens because I never cleaned one. I'll learn more by reading than I will by writing on here.

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Old 10-02-2013, 08:02 PM   #29
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Greetings,
EVENTUALLY I'll get a bunch of this stuff for neatening up wire runs...Flexible Wire Loom For Cable Management
" I'll learn more by reading than I will by writing on here." Au contraire Mr. Bluto. EVERY comment has the potential for generating feedback. See, now you'll not use kitty litter in your bilge.
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Old 10-02-2013, 08:14 PM   #30
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Mr. Tom's ER is a REAL Holy Place. Clean, tidy and well appointed from what little I saw.

Mr. Tom's first mate gets her miniature arms under the engine every couple of cruises to change the diapers. The tray under Dr Perky holds three puppy pads. I've also been known to vacuum while down there.
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Old 10-02-2013, 08:19 PM   #31
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Greetings,
EVENTUALLY I'll get a bunch of this stuff for neatening up wire runs...Flexible Wire Loom For Cable Management
" I'll learn more by reading than I will by writing on here." Au contraire Mr. Bluto. EVERY comment has the potential for generating feedback. See, now you'll not use kitty litter in your bilge.
If I used sump pumps that could digest trash, then I could deploy the kitty litter... I'd just need 20 of them.
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Old 10-02-2013, 11:36 PM   #32
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The oil absorbing pads are great. I use them in my ER floor throughout as I do all my normal maintenance. Last week I dripped a few drops of oil on the floor under me. No worries the pads clean it all up. Under the engine I lay them down and if there is any drips of any nature they take care of it. I am getting ready to replace them and the ER will be lined white again. This way if anything drips I know about it fairly quickly. I am going to replace both oil pan gaskets next month. The oil pads are about .50 a piece so for about 10-15.00 you can line your ER. If you were just covering under the engine most engines only need two to three pads.
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Old 10-03-2013, 06:57 AM   #33
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I think I'm going to look for some kind of trays and put pads on them because the space under my oil pan is very obstructed. Kitty litter is like clay/sand. Just messier than I want to use. I'm messy enough already.
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Old 10-03-2013, 09:33 AM   #34
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Baker mentioned earlier that you may look at cutting down a plastic bin of some kind. That's a pretty good tip. Maybe one of the big, but shallow, ones that are designed to slide under a bed. In your case, you may want to look at the idea of gluing some blocks to the inner hull under your motor to make a place to set them. You might also consider rerouting your waste line that runs under there, but since shit doesn't run uphill, that may pose a challenge.
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:21 AM   #35
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In your case, you may want to look at the idea of gluing some blocks to the inner hull under your motor to make a place to set them. You might also consider rerouting your waste line that runs under there, but since shit doesn't run uphill, that may pose a challenge.


Yeah, waste line replacement/modernizing is on my list. Once we get the move complete (house), I'll be looking back to boat projects. I want to degrease and paint my engine as much as possible and free up access if I can move my battery boxes. From there I need to check all my connections and go crazy with the wire brush.

Since I got my coveralls and the weather's gotten cooler, there's no more scrapes and cuts and I can spill diesel on myself like crazy now .
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Old 10-03-2013, 12:46 PM   #36
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Be careful moving your batteries. There are a few gotchas. First is obviously wiring. I can lend you my giant tool (and it crimps too) for making your own battery cables, but the worry is that it almost always leads down a path to a bigger project. Like adding switches, buss bars, and chargers. Second is ballast weight. With that many bigazz batteries, you might want to be conscience of weight distribution. Finally, access. They need to not only be in a place that allows engine access for filling and testing, but can be easily replaced every few years or so without having a member of the UCLA football team come help lift them out.

What I see in your engine space is to first get a proper sower sump system and do away with that weird contraption of batteries over water. That is just plain weird. That will quickly lead you into a battery placement and management project.

Just think it through thoroughly. If you provide the beer (GOOD beer!), I might be persuaded to come help you think.
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Old 10-13-2013, 10:42 AM   #37
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All good advice here with a few things to note:

Use cushion clamps to secure wiring as opposed to tie wraps - less chafe.

I have found dishwasher detergent (like Cascade) the best engine room cleaner ever. It cuts grease, diesel fuel, all of it. When I removed my steel fuel tanks, it left a horrible mess, Cascade cleaned it all squeaky clean.
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Old 10-13-2013, 12:20 PM   #38
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Wouldn't Dawn work too?
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Old 10-13-2013, 03:06 PM   #39
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For ground in dirt and oil on rough fiberglass (like in the bilge) powdered dishwasher soap mixed with a little warm water and a stiff brush works really good for cleaning. Just be sure and wear gloves and some eye protection, it can be quite caustic to your skin and eyes. Be sure and wipe it up and dispose of it appropriately.

Dawn is good for cleaning and wiping up lightly oiled surfaces and even your hands. Its probably one of the better detergents for that purpose. We used to mix Dawn with a little water and squirt on small fuel spills at the fuel docks. But I am told that is nolonger acceptable as it is acts as a dispersant and doesn't remove the oil from the water.
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Old 10-13-2013, 04:52 PM   #40
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The Purple stuff!!! Biodegradable and powerful. Alkaline, not acidic. Beats any soap product and Simple Green hands down.
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